Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is found from India's Nicobar Islands and along the mainland coast from Bangladesh and Myanmar eastwards throughout Southeast Asia to the Philippines, and southwards to Papua New Guinea and Northern Australia (Murphy 2007).
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Continent: Asia Australia
Distribution: Australia (North Territory, Queensland, West Australia) Bangladesh;  India (Bengal);  Indonesia (Borneo, Irian Jaya, Seram=Ceram, Sumatra, Java; Timor, Ambon);  Malaysia (Malaya and East Malaysia);  Myanmar (Burma), Papua New Guinea Philippine Islands;  Singapore;  Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam  
Type locality: Timor (Indonesia)
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Source: The Reptile Database

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Ecology

Habitat

in mangroves; crab-eating
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species occurs in mangrove forests and associated mud flats. It may enter surrounding monsoon forest or open ocean but is unlikely to remain in these habitats as it is fairly habitat specific. This relatively sedentary species utilizes intertidal burrow systems and eats small crustaceans (Murphy 2007).

This species is usually found in 0-10 m of water (Cogger 2007).

Systems
  • Freshwater
  • Marine
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
Murphy, J., Read, M. & Guinea, M.

Reviewer/s
Livingstone, S.R., Elfes, C.T., Polidoro, B.A. & Carpenter, K.E. (Global Marine Species Assessment Coordinating Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is considered locally common over much of its range, and is often in large numbers when it is found. There are no major threats to this species. Therefore this species has been listed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
This species is locally common over its range. It is mostly found late at night (J. Murphy pers. comm. 2009), although smaller specimens may be found during the day (M. Guinea pers. comm. 2009). Often found in large groups (J. Murphy pers. comm. 2009).

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
No known major threats specific to this species are known, but threats to the associated habitat such as mangrove forests may be detrimental to the species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no known conservation measures in place for this species.
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Wikipedia

Fordonia leucobalia

The aquatic snake Fordonia leucobalia is known by the common names crab-eating water snake and white-bellied mangrove snake.[2] It is a common resident of mangrove swamps and tropical tidal wetlands from Southeast Asia to the coasts of Northern Australia.

Individual F. leucobalia reach up to a meter in length, and are brown or gray in color with a white belly. There is significant color variation. Some have spots. The anatomy reflects the snake's water-living lifestyle: the eyes are located atop the head, and the nostrils have valves that close when the snake dives.

The snake eats small prey that live in its habitat, such as frogs and small fish, and it specializes in crabs, hence its name. Like other homalopsines, F. leucobalia bears live young.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/176694/0
  2. ^ "Fordonia leucobalia (Schlegel, 1837)". Atlas of Living Australia. Retrieved 12 November 2014. 
  • Boulenger, George A. 1890 The Fauna of British India, Including Ceylon and Burma. Reptilia and Batrachia. Taylor & Francis, London, xviii, 541 pp.
  • Frith,C.B. & MacIver,D. 1978 The crab-eating Water Snake, Fordonia leucobalia (Schlegel), another snake new to Thailand. Nat. Hist. Bull. Siam Soc. (Bangkok) 27: 189-191
  • Schlegel, H. 1837 Essai sur la physionomie des serpens. Partie Généralxxviii +251 S. + Partie Descriptiv606 S. + xvi. La Haye (J. Kips, J. HZ. et W. P. van Stockum)
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