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Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs at low elevations in Mexico on the Atlantic slope in Veracruz, Tabasco, and southern Campeche, and across the Isthmus Tehuantepec of Mexico to the Pacific slope from Jalisco and Colima to Chiapas and southward to Costa Rica (and western Panama, according to Savage 2002). Elevational range extends from sea level to 1,900 meters.
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Continent: Middle-America
Distribution: Mexico (Veracruz, Yucatan), Belize, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama ?, Colombia (Pérez-Santos & Moreno 1988)  
Type locality: Tabasco, Mexico
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Source: The Reptile Database

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Physical Description

Type Information

Holotype for Clelia scytalina
Catalog Number: USNM 6581
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles
Preparation: Ethanol
Locality: San Juan Bautista, Tabasco, Mexico
  • Holotype: Cope, E. D. 1867. Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia. 18: 320.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
These terrestrial snakes occur in leaf-litter and under logs of tropical semideciduous, deciduous, and evergreen lowland forests. In Costa Rica, they can be found also in premontane and lower montane humid forests (Savage 2002). They also occurs in degraded and secondary forest and agricultural habitats.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Marco Antonio Lopez-Luna and Luis Canseco

Reviewer/s
Bowles, P.

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern because it is widespread, has a presumed large population, and because it is not declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.
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Population

Population
These snakes are uncommon.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no major threats to this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Currently, this species is of relatively low conservation concern and does not require significant additional protection or major management, monitoring, or research action. Its range includes a few protected areas.
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Wikipedia

Clelia scytalina

Clelia scytalina, commonly known as the Mexican snake eater[2] or zopilota de altura (highland mussarana),[3] is a species of colubrid snake endemic to the New World.

Contents

Geographic range

It is found in Southern Mexico, Central America, and Colombia.[2]

Description

The head is somewhat distinct from the neck. The eye is moderate in size, with a vertically elliptical pupil. The body is cylindrical, and the tail is moderately long.[3]

The smooth dorsal scales are arranged in 17 rows at midbody.[3]

The coloration of juveniles is completely different from that of adults. Juveniles have a black head, a yellow or white nuchal crossband (collar), and a red body. They are often mistaken for coral snakes and killed.[3]

Habitat

It is a terrestrial animal which inhabits old-growth and second-growth forests and their borders. Occasionally it is found in open areas in submontane and montane life zones.[3]

Diet

Like other species of mussurana, it is known to feed on other snakes.[3]

Reproduction

It is oviparous (egg-laying).[3]

References

  1. ^ "Clelia scytalina". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 22 April 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c Reptarium. Clelia scytalina (Cope, 1867) at the Reptile Database. Consulted: 22 April 2012.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Muñoz Chacón, Federico. (2000) Clelia scytalina (Cope, 1867). INBio (Instituto Nacional de Biodiversidad), Costa Rica. Consulted: 22 April 2012.
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