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Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is found in the Big Bend region (Brewster and Presidio counties), Texas, and adjacent Mexico (southern Coahuila and northeastern Durango) (Dixon 2000). Curious gaps exist in the known distribution (Dixon 2000).
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occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: Big Bend region (Brewster and Presidio counties), Texas, and adjacent Mexico (southern Coahuila and northeastern Durango) (Dixon 2000). Curious gaps exist in the known distribution (Dixon 2000).

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Continent: Middle-America North-America
Distribution: USA (Texas),  Mexico (Coahuila)  
Type locality: Black Gap (elevation: 2500 feet), 50 mi. SSE of Marathon, Brewster County, Texas.
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Physical Description

Size

Length: 17 cm

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This lizard occurs in limestone canyons and other rocky areas in desert regions; most of those found thus far were on roads on summer evenings (Bartlett and Bartlett 1999). Individuals may climb on rocks or, when inactive, hide under them (Behler and King 1979, Dial 1978). Eggs are laid probably underground or under rocks.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Comments: This lizard occurs in limestone canyons and other rocky areas in desert regions; most of those found thus far were on roads on summer evenings (Bartlett and Bartlett 1999). Individuals may climb on rocks or, when inactive, hide under them (Behler and King 1979, Dial 1978). Eggs are laid probably underground or under rocks.

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Migration

Non-Migrant: Yes. At least some populations of this species do not make significant seasonal migrations. Juvenile dispersal is not considered a migration.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Trophic Strategy

Comments: Known prey includes beetles, grasshoppers, and spiders (Dial 1978).

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: Unknown

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Global Abundance

Unknown

Comments: Population size is unknown. Bartlett and Bartlett (1999) reported that this species is infrequently seen; it may be rare, secretive, or both. Dixon (2000) stated that this species is more common in Texas than was previously believed.

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2007

Assessor/s
Hammerson, G.A.

Reviewer/s
Cox, N., Chanson, J.S. & Stuart, S.N. (Global Reptile Assessment Coordinating Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern because extent of occurrence, area of occupancy, number of subpopulations, and abundance probably are relatively stable and appear to exceed the qualifying criteria for the threatened categories; also, no major threats have been identified.
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G3 - Vulnerable

Reasons: Small range in the Big Bend region of Texas and adjacent Mexico; locally common; probably stable; not threatened.

Intrinsic Vulnerability: Moderately vulnerable

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Population

Population
Population size is unknown. Bartlett and Bartlett (1999) reported that this species is infrequently seen; it may be rare, secretive, or both. Dixon (2000) stated that this species is more common in Texas than was previously believed. This lizard is locally common but very secretive and difficult to survey; it is probably stable, but population information is inadequate for reliably assessing trends (A. Price pers. comm. 1997). The species is found infrequently but is not threatened (R. Axtell pers. comm. 1997). It has a fairly restricted range and has not been well studied; nevertheless, it probably has a very stable population (R. Savage pers. comm. 1997). Status in Mexico is unknown but is assumed to be stable (J. Karges pers. comm. 1997).

Population Trend
Stable
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Global Short Term Trend: Relatively stable (=10% change)

Comments: This lizard is locally common but very secretive and difficult to survey; it is probably stable, but population information is inadequate for reliably assessing trends (A. Price, pers. comm., 1997). The species is found infrequently but not endangered (R. Axtell, pers. comm., 1997). It has a fairly restricted range and has not been well studied; nevertheless, it probably has a very stable population (R. Savage, pers. comm., 1997). Status in Mexico is unknown but is assumed to be stable (J. Karges, pers. comm., 1997).

Global Long Term Trend: Increase of 10-25% to decline of 30%

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Threats

Major Threats
Threats are insignificant; the habitat is not suitable for other uses (R. Savage pers. comm. 1997). Potential threats include commercial collecting for the pet trade, but the habitat is not easily accessible, so collecting is not a major threat (A. Price pers. comm. 1997). Individuals occur under cap rocks; breaking rocks while surveying may be detrimental (R. Savage pers. comm. 1997).
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Degree of Threat: Low

Comments: Threats are insignificant; the habitat is not suitable for other uses (R. Savage, pers. comm., 1997).
Potential threats include commercial collecting for the pet trade, but the habitat is not easily accessible, so collecting is not a major threat (A. Price, pers. comm., 1997). Individuals occur under cap rocks; breaking rocks while surveying may be detrimental (R. Savage, pers. comm., 1997).

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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The species occurs in Big Bend National Park and Big Bend State Natural Area (R. Savage pers. comm. 1997). Better informarion is needed on distribution, abundance, and trends.
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Global Protection: Few to several (1-12) occurrences appropriately protected and managed

Comments: The species occurs in Big Bend National Park and Big Bend State Natural Area (R. Savage, pers. comm., 1997).

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Wikipedia

Coleonyx reticulatus

Coleonyx reticulatus is a species of small gecko native to the United States (Texas) and Mexico (Coahuila). It is sometimes referred to as the Reticulated Gecko or Reticulate Banded Gecko.

Contents

Description

Reticulated geckos can grow to 6.5 inches long, and are a pink or brown color with brown or black spots, sometimes with faint banding. They can easily be mistaken for Coleonyx brevis, as they share habitat, but Coleonyx reticulatus grows to a larger size.

Behavior

C. reticulatus is nocturnal and carnivorous, consuming almost any small species of arthropod. They are found in semi-arid, rocky areas. They are capable of vocalizations, and sometimes will emit squeaking sounds if handled.

Conservation concerns

The reticulated gecko is listed as a threatened species in the state of Texas, as it only occurs in two counties, but its habitat is fairly remote and not easily accessible and is not under immediate threat. Also, part of its habitat is found within the protected confines of Big Bend National Park.

References

  1. ^ Davis, W. B., and J. R. Dixon. 1958. A new Coleonyx from Texas. Proc. Biol. Soc. Washington 71:149-152
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: For many years Coleonyx geckos were placed in the family Gekkonidae. In a cladistic analysis of the Gekkonoidea, Kluge (1987) placed the genus Coleonyx in the family Eublepharidae (subfamily Eublepharinae), recognized as distinct from the Gekkonidae. Bartlett and Bartlett (1999), Grismer (2002), and Stebbins (2003) likewise placed Coleonyx in the Eublepharidae, whereas Dixon (2000) retained Coleonyx in the Gekkonidae.

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