Overview

Brief Summary

Common Names

Port Darwin sea snake

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Notes

Syntypes: BMNH 1946.1.1.91-92 (formerly BMNH 1884.9.13.24-25).

Type-locality: Port Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.

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Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs across the northern part of Australia from Broome in the west to the northeast side of the Gulf of Carpentaria in the east, and in southern Papua Guinea.
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Continent: Australia
Distribution: Coral Sea (S New Guinea, Australia) Australia (North Territory, Queensland, West Australia)  
Type locality: Port Darwin, N. T.
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Shallow, marine, coastal waters of southern New Guinea and northern Australia (from about Broome to Gulf of Carpentaria).

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species occurs in mangrove mudflats (Guinea et al. 1993). It has been seen crawling on consolidated mud out of water into a nearby crab burrow to forage (Guinea et al. 1993). It is preyed on by sharks (Lyle and Timms 1987). Can live in coastal areas disturbed by human development.

Systems
  • Marine
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
Guinea, M., Lukoschek, V., Sanders, K., Milton, D. & Lobo, A.

Reviewer/s
Livingstone, S.R., Elfes, C.T., Polidoro, B.A. & Carpenter, K.E. (Global Marine Species Assessment Coordinating Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is relatively widespread along the northern coast of Australia and on the southern coast of New Guinea. There is no information on the population status, however, there is no evidence of major threats. It is a mangrove-associated species, and is able to live in areas inhabited by humans. This species is listed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
This is quite a common species in Broome (Sweet 1989). There is no information on population trends (M. Guinea pers. comm. 2009).

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no known major threats to this species, but development to associated habitat such as mangrove forests may be a concern.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
No sea snake species is currently listed by CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora).

Sea snakes are protected in Australia since their addition to the "Listed Marine Species" by the Department of Environment and Water Resources in 2000. They are protected in Australia under the Environment Protection Biodiversity and Conservation Act 1999.

Conservation of mangrove areas is important for protection of this species.
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