Overview

Comprehensive Description

Brief

"Snout moderate, obtuse. Lower eyelid scaly. Nostril behind vertical of suture between rostral and first labial; no postnasal; anterior loreal usually shorter and deeper than the second, in contact with the first labial; frontonasal broader than long, usually in contact with the rostral, and frequently also with the frontal; latter as long as the frontoparietals and interparietal together or shorter, in contact with the second supraocular (rarely also with the first); 4 supraoculars, second largest; usually 6 supraciliaries, first largest; frontoparietals distinct, larger than the interparietal, which entirely separates the parietals; a pair of nuchals ; 4 labials anterior to the subocular, which is large and not narrower below. Ear-opening roundish, subtriangular, as large as a lateral scale or smaller, without or with a few very indistinct lobules anteriorly. Dorsal, nuchal, and lateral scales more or less strongly tri- or quinquecarinate; 30 to 34 scales round the middle of the body, subequal. The hind limb reaches the wrist or the elbow of the adpressed fore limb. Sub digital lamellae smooth. Scales on upper surface of tibia mostly bicarinate. Tail 1.5 to 1.8 times length of head and body. Brown or olive-brown above, uniform or with small black spots or longitudinal lines; sides darker, with or without lighter spots; a light dorso-latexal band begins on the supraciliaries; lower surfaces yellowish (in spirit). In the breeding-season males have a scarlet band from the shoulder to the thigh."
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Distribution

Range Description

This species inhabits all of India, including the northwest (R.Vyas pers. comm. 2010). It is also found in Nepal (R. Vyas pers. comm.), Bangladesh, the Maldives, and Sri Lanka (Shrestha 2001).
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India
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Continent: Asia
Distribution: India (except in the North-West), Nepal, Bangladesh, Maldives, Sri Lanka  lankae: Sri Lanka  
Type locality: “India orientali”, probably from Tranquebar (BAUER 1998).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is ground-dwelling (Horton 1973), and is thought to inhabit shrubland and forests of the region. It is oviparous (Smith 1935).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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General Habitat

Open forested areas
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
de Silva, A. & Vyas, R.V.

Reviewer/s
Böhm, M., Collen, B. & Ram, M. (Sampled Red List Index Coordinating Team)

Contributor/s
De Silva, R., Milligan, H.T., Wearn, O.R., Wren, S., Zamin, T., Sears, J., Wilson, P., Lewis, S., Lintott, P. & Powney, G.

Justification
Eutropis carinata has been listed as Least Concern because it has a widespread distribution across India, Bangladesh, the Maldives, and Sri Lanka. No major threats have been reported and this species is not undergoing population declines. Further research into the specific habitat preferences of this species should be carried out.
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Population

Population
There is no population information available for this species.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
It is unlikely that any major threat is impacting this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no known species-specific conservation measures in place for this species. Further research into the specific habitat preferences of this species should be carried out. Population monitoring is also recommended.
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Wikipedia

Eutropis carinata

The Keeled Indian Mabuya (Eutropis carinata), also called Many-keeled Grass Skink or (ambiguously) "golden skink", is a species of skink found in South Asia.

Description[edit]

Snout moderate, obtuse. Lower eyelid scaly. Nostril behind vertical of suture between rostral and first labial; no postnasal; anterior loreal usually shorter and deeper than the second, in contact with the first labial; frontonasal broader than long, usually in contact with the rostral, and frequently also with the frontal; latter as long as the frontoparietals and interparietal together or shorter, in contact with the second supraocular (rarely also with the first); 4 supraoculars, second largest; usually 6 supraciliaries, first largest; frontoparietals distinct, larger than the interparietal, which entirely separates the parietals; a pair of nuchals ; 4 labials anterior to the subocular, which is large and not narrower below. Ear-opening roundish, subtriangular, as large as a lateral scale or smaller, without or with a few very indistinct lobules anteriorly. Dorsal, nuchal, and lateral scales more or less strongly tri- or quinquecarinate; 30 to 34 scales round the middle of the body, subequal. The hind limb reaches the wrist or the elbow of the adpressed fore limb. Sub digital lamellae smooth. Scales on upper surface of tibia mostly bicarinate. Tail 1.5 to 1.8 times length of head and body. Brown or olive-brown above, uniform or with small black spots or longitudinal lines; sides darker, with or without lighter spots; a light dorso-latexal band begins on the supraciliaries; lower surfaces yellowish (in spirit). In the breeding-season males have a scarlet band from the shoulder to the thigh.[1]

From snout to vent 5 inches; tail 9.5.

Distribution[edit]

India (except in the North-West), Bangladesh, Maldives, Sri Lanka, Nepal.

Ecology & Diet[edit]

Sri Lanka subspecies lankae are encountered inmany habitat types, from rain forests and deserts to scrub forests and parks and gardens of houses ad cities. Diurnal, and terrestrial, frequently seen basking or foraging in open areas. Crickets, caterpillars, beetles, and earthworms and even small vertebrates are known to consume.

Reproduction[edit]

Clutches of 2-20 eggs are laid at a time in a self-excavated hole or under fallen logs, between August and September. Eggs are measuring 11 * 17mm. Hatchlings emerge between May and June, measure 12-12.5mm.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Boulenger, G. A. 1890. Fauna of British India. Reptilia and Batrachia.

References[edit]

  • Gray, J. E. 1846 Descriptions of some new species of Indian Lizards. Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (1)18: 429-430
  • Smith,M.A. 1935 Reptiles and Amphibia, Vol. II. in: The fauna of British India, including Ceylon and Burma. Taylor and Francis, London, 440 pp.
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