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Overview

Brief Summary

Notes

Holotype: USNM 7347 according to Golay et al., 1993, Endogly. Venom. Snakes World 478pp.[177].

Type-locality: Taboga Island, Bay of Panama.

Many subspecies have been described; most of these are ill-defined with a considerable amount of overlap of diagnostic characters occurring between populations. The following subspecies were recognized by Roze, 1983 [dated 1982], Mem. Inst. Butantan 46:305-338: M. n. nigrocinctus (Girard, 1854); M. n. babaspul Roze, 1967; M. n. coibensis Schmidt, 1936; M. n. divaricatus (Hallowell, 1855); M. n. melanocephalus (Hallowell, 1860); M. n. mosquitensis Schmidt, 1933; M. n. ruatanus (Günther, 1895), and M. n. zunilensis Schmidt, 1932.

M. ruatanus was recognized as a valid species by Wilson and Meyer, 1985, Snakes Honduras, 2nd ed., 159pp.[115]; Campbell and Lamar, 1989, Venom Rept. Latin Am., 425pp.[142]; and Wilson, McCranie, and Slowinski, 1992, Cat. Am. Amph. Rept. 545. 1-2[1].

There are probably several species in this complex; several populations were shown to have chromosomal differences by Gutérrez and Bolaños, 1979, Rev. Biol. Trop. 27:57-73, and Gutiérrez and Bolaños, 1981 [dated 1980], Rev. Biol. Trop. (1)29:115-122.

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© Mohammadi, Shabnam

Source: Snake Species of the World

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Distribution

Pacific side of Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama to adjacent Colombia. Roatán Island, Islas de Bahia, Honduras.

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Source: Snake Species of the World

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Continent: Middle-America South-America Caribbean
Distribution: Mexico (Chiapas, Yucatan), Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, W Caribbean; elevation (Honduras): 0-1600 m  nigrocinctus: Pacific coasts of Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, N Colombia  babaspul: Nicaragua (Corn Islands)  coibensis: Panama (Coiba Island);
Type locality: Coiba Island, Panama.  divaricatus: Belize, N/C Honduras  ovandoensis: Mexico (Chiapas).
Type locality: Salto de Agua, Mount Ovando, about fifteen miles northeast of Escuintla, Chiapas. Altitude 1,200 feet elevation.  zunilensis: Pacific coasts of Mexico (Chiapas), Guatemala, El Salvador, S Honduras;
Type locality: Finca El Cipres, lower slopes of Volcan Zunil, Suchitepequez, Guatemala.  
Type locality: "Taboga Island, Bay of Panama, Panama" (Girard, C. 1854)
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© Peter Uetz

Source: The Reptile Database

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Physical Description

Type Information

Syntype for Micrurus nigrocinctus
Catalog Number: USNM 7347
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles
Sex/Stage: Female;
Preparation: Ethanol
Locality: Tabago (= Isla Taboga), Isla Taboga, Panamá, Panama
  • Syntype: Girard, C. 1854. Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia. 7 (6): 226.
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© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Syntype for Micrurus nigrocinctus
Catalog Number: USNM 329492
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles
Preparation: Ethanol
Locality: Tabago (= Isla Taboga), Isla Taboga, Panamá, Panama
  • Syntype: Girard, C. 1854. Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia. 7 (6): 226.
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© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Holotype for Micrurus nigrocinctus
Catalog Number: USNM 7331
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles
Preparation: Ethanol
Locality: No Further Locality Data, Nicaragua
  • Holotype: Hallowell, E. 1860. Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia. 12: 485.
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© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Micrurus nigrocinctus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Micrurus nigrocinctus

Micrurus nigrocinctus, commonly known as the Central American coral snake, is a species of venomous elapid snake that ranges from southern Mexico through Central America (except Belize) to northwestern Colombia.[1] There are six recognized subspecies, including the nominate subspecies described here.[2]

Common names[edit]

Central American coral snake. In Spanish: Serpiente-coralillo centroamericana,[2] Coral Centroamericana, coralillo, gargantilla, salviara, limlim, babaspul, coral macho.[1]

Description[edit]

The Central American coral snake is capable of growing to 115 cm (45 in), but most are closer to 65 cm (26 in). They have smooth scales, a rounded head, and eyes with round pupils. Its color pattern can vary from two-colored to three-colored. with black, yellow and red banding.[1] The snout is black. Halfway the head, there is usually a yellow ring (in three-colored specimens) or a red ring (in bi-colored specimens). Color pattern on the body consists of often fairly broad red bands separated by much narrower sets of yellow-black-yellow bands. The numbers of black bands on the body may vary from 10 to 24, and an additional 3 to 8 on the tail.

Geographic range[edit]

It ranges from southern Mexico through Central America (except Belize) to northwestern Colombia, and the west Caribbean. It is mainly found in lowland rain forest, lowland dry forest, thorn forest, lower montane wet (or moist) forest, and lower montane dry forest, usually at elevations up to 1,300m.[1]

Behavior[edit]

It is mainly a terrestrial snake that often dwells in burrows, leaf litter, or under logs. Like most coral snakes it is usually nocturnal, though it may also be active at dusk and dawn, and sometimes after rainfall. It feeds on other snakes, small lizards, amphibians, and invertebrates.[1] While usually not aggressive, it will bite when molested or restrained.[1]

Venom[edit]

The Central American coral snake's venom contains a strong neurotoxin, causing neuromuscular dysfunction.[1]

Subspecies[edit]

There are six recognized subspecies of Micrurus nigrocinctus:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g AFBMP. "Micrurus nigrocinctus". AFBMP Living Hazards Database. AFBMP. Retrieved 2010-08-05. 
  2. ^ a b "Micrurus nigrocinctus". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
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