Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is known from low elevations of the Pacific foothills and coastal plain from southwestern Oaxaca to extreme western Chiapas, Mexico. The elevational range is from near sea level up to a little over 700 m asl.
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Continent: Middle-America
Distribution: Mexico (coastal plain of Oaxaca, W Chiapas)
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Source: The Reptile Database

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species occurs terrestrially in tropical deciduous forest characterized by thorny, relatively short trees. It occurs in secondary forest but not in heavily altered habitats.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2007

Assessor/s
Muñoz-Alonso, A.

Reviewer/s
Cox, N., Chanson, J.S. & Stuart, S.N. (Global Reptile Assessment Coordinating Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern, because it is relatively widespread and common, although population monitoring may be necessary to determine the extent and population effects of current deforestation.
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Population

Population
It is uncommon but regularly found, including four records from 2004.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
The major threat is habitat loss due to expanding agriculture.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is protected by Mexican law under the category A (Threatened). It occurs in the La Sepultura Biosphere Reserve.
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Wikipedia

Porthidium dunni

Common names: Dunn's hognosed pitviper.[2]

Porthidium dunni is a venomous pitviper species found in Mexico. No subspecies are currently recognized.[3]

Contents

Etymology

The specific name, dunni, is in honor of American herpetologist Emmett Reid Dunn "in appreciation of his work on American snake fauna".

Description

Adults are usually 30-40 cm (11¾-15¾ inches) in total length, with a maximum of 57 cm (22⅜ inches). A moderately stout and terrestrial species, the tip of the snout is moderately elevated.[2]

Geographic range

Found in southern Mexico in the Pacific lowlands of Oaxaca and western Chiapas. The type locality given is "the immediate vicinity of the village of Tehuantepec" [Oaxaca, Mexico].[1]

Conservation status

This species is classified as Least Concern (LC) on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (v3.1, 2001).[4] Species are listed as such due to their wide distribution, presumed large population, or because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category. The population trend is stable. Year assessed: 2007.[5]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b McDiarmid RW, Campbell JA, Touré T. 1999. Snake Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference, vol. 1. Herpetologists' League. 511 pp. ISBN 1-893777-00-6 (series). ISBN 1-893777-01-4 (volume).
  2. ^ a b Campbell JA, Lamar WW. 2004. The Venomous Reptiles of the Western Hemisphere. 2 volumes. Comstock Publishing Associates, Ithaca and London. 870 pp. 1500 plates. ISBN 0-8014-4141-2.
  3. ^ "Porthidium dunni". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. http://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=585988. Retrieved 15 September 2007.
  4. ^ Porthidium dunni at the IUCN Red List. Accessed 15 September 2007.
  5. ^ 2001 Categories & Criteria (version 3.1) at the IUCN Red List. Accessed 15 September 2007.

Further reading

  • Hartweg, Norman and James A. Oliver. A Contribution to the Herpetology of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec: III. Three New Snakes from the Pacific Slope. Occasional Papers of the Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan (390): 1-8. (Trimeresurus dunni)
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