Overview

Brief Summary

Biology

Whilst normally insectivorous, a female cock-tailed tyrant has been seen feeding fruit to her two fledglings. Breeding occurs between September and October, coinciding with the start of the wet season. The cock-tailed tyrant is migratory in some areas (2).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

A displaying species, the male cock-tailed tyrant flaunts elongated tail feathers that fan out in a crescent. Males are mostly black above, with a grey rump and white between the top of the wings. There is a black patch on the sides of the breast and the tail is black. In strong contrast, the face and underparts are white. Females are similar to males, but are brown rather than black and have a normal-shaped, short tail (2).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

Range Description

Alectrurus tricolor has become very scarce and local over a large range in north and east Bolivia, occurring in a few scattered localities in La Paz and Santa Cruz (Parker et al. 1991, Ridgely and Tudor 1994, Brace et al. 1997) and frequently in the pampas of north and west Beni (Parker et al. 1991, Ridgely and Tudor 1994, Brace et al. 1997, M. Herrera in litt. 2007), but being inexplicably absent from large areas (Parker et al. 1991, Brace et al. 1997); central and southern Brazil (R. E. Fernandes Santos in litt. 2011), in Mato Grosso, Mato Grosso do Sul, Gois, Distrito Federal, Minas Gerais and Esprito Santo south to Paran, where there are few records (Santos 2007, R. E. Fernandes Santos in litt. 2011), and possibly Rio Grande do Sul (Ridgely and Tudor 1994, Machado et al. 1998,L. F. Silveira in litt. 2000); east Paraguay, in Concepcin, San Pedro (Robbins et al. 1999, M. B. Robbins in litt. 2000, H. del Castillo in litt. 2007), Cordillera (Lowen et al. 1996), Caazap (Clay et al. 1998), Itapa (M. Velzquez in litt. 2000, H. del Castillo in litt. 2007, Codesido and Fraga 2009) and Misiones (H. del Castillo in litt. 2007, Codesido and Fraga 2009), and north Argentina, where a few old specimens were taken in north-east Corrientes and south Misiones (Ridgely and Tudor 1994), but the species has not been recorded since September 1979, despite searches in suitable habitat (Pearman and Abadie 1995). In Brazil it remains locally common only in a few scattered protected areas in Gois, Distrito Federal and Minas Gerais (Machado et al. 1998), while in Paraguay it is generally very rare (R. Clay in litt. 2011), but locally common and apparently a stable breeding resident at Estancia Laguna Blanca in San Pedro; Estancia La Graciela in Misiones, and Kanguery in San Rafael National Park, Itapa (H. del Castillo in litt. 2007).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Range

Locally in e Bolivia, ne Argentina, ne Paraguay and s Brazil.
  • Clements, J. F., T. S. Schulenberg, M. J. Iliff, D. Roberson, T. A. Fredericks, B. L. Sullivan, and C. L. Wood. 2014. The eBird/Clements checklist of birds of the world: Version 6.9. Downloaded from http://www.birds.cornell.edu/clementschecklist/download/

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Range

Although it occupies a very large range, covering north and east Bolivia, south Brazil, east Paraguay and north Argentina, the cock-tailed tyrant is patchily distributed and scarce within this area (2).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It inhabits seasonally wet and dry grasslands, known as "campo limpo" and "campo sujo" respectively (Parker et al. 1991, Machado et al. 1998, Silveira 1998), favouring areas of taller vegetation (30-100 cm) and, in Bolivia, especially areas of Trachypogon (Parker et al. 1991). In southern Brazil, the species has been recorded in humid grassland dominated by Cyperaceae, as well as Poaceae, species (R. E. Fernandes Santos in litt. 2011). Although it normally disappears from burnt sites (Cavalcanti 1988), it has been observed feeding on the ground in recently burnt areas (Lowen et al. 1996). It is generally insectivorous, though a female has been observed feeding small fruit to two fledglings. In Serra da Canastra it is migratory, arriving between mid-August and September and departing in December and January (Silveira 1998), but it appears to be resident at several sites in Paraguay (H. del Castillo in litt. 2007). Breeding occurs at the start of the wet season in September and October (Parker et al. 1991, M. B. Robbins in litt. 2000). In southern Brazil, it has been recorded nesting on the ground in a very wet area of grassland (R. E. Fernandes Santos in litt. 2011).


Systems
  • Terrestrial
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

The cock-tailed tyrant inhabits seasonally wet and dry grasslands, preferring areas with tall vegetation. It was thought to avoid freshly burnt areas, but has been seen feeding in them on several occasions (2).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
VU
Vulnerable

Red List Criteria
A2c+3c+4c

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s
Clay, R., Fernandes Santos, R., Herrera, M., Robbins, M., Silveira, L., Velsquez, M. & del Castillo, H.

Justification
Extensive and continuing habitat loss throughout the range of this species has presumably resulted in rapid population declines. It consequently qualifies as Vulnerable.


History
  • Vulnerable (VU)
  • Vulnerable (VU)
  • Vulnerable (VU)
  • Vulnerable (VU)
  • Lower Risk/near threatened (LR/nt)
  • Near Threatened (NT)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5