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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Source: IUCN

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Empidonax flavescens

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has a very large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size is very large, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
Partners in Flight estimate the total population to number 50,000-499,999 individuals (A. Panjabi in litt. 2008).

Population Trend
Stable
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Wikipedia

Yellowish Flycatcher

The Yellowish Flycatcher (Empidonax flavescens) is a small passerine bird in the tyrant flycatcher family. It breeds in highlands from southeastern Mexico south to western Panama.[2]

Description[edit]

The Yellowish Flycatcher is 12.5 cm long and weighs 12 g. Its upper parts are olive-green and the underparts are yellow with an ochre tint to the breast. The wings are blackish with two buff wing bars. It has a white eye ring broadening into a small triangle behind the eye. Sexes are similar, but young birds are browner above and paler yellow below. The call is a thin seeep and the dawn song is a rapid repeated seee seee chit.

Yellowish Flycatcher Empidonax flavescens eggs and nest along a small creek near Providencia, Costa Rica

This species needs to be distinguished from migratory Empidonax species, since several species, including Willow, Alder and Acadian Flycatchers pass through in the autumn. It has a more prominent eye ring than any migrant species, and despite that species’ name, is yellower below than Yellow-bellied Flycatcher.[2]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

This species is found in cool mountain forest, especially at the edges, in clearings, along roadsides and near streams, and in second growth and bushy pastures. It breeds from 800 m to nearly 2500 m altitude.[2]

Behaviour and ecology[edit]

The deep cup nest is made of plant fibre and mosses, and placed 2–4.5 m high in a crevice in a tree trunk or earth bank. Nests are often in moss near streams. The typical clutch is two or three white eggs, marked with pale rufous speckles. Incubation by the female is 14–15 days to hatching, with another 17 days to fledging. They accept the eggs of brood parasites, and are therefore occasionally hosts of the Bronzed Cowbird. Yellowish Flycatchers are active birds, usually seen alone when not breeding.

They eat insects, spiders and some small berries. Nestlings are fed exclusively insects, especially spiders. The prey is gleaned from the foliage, taken in flight in short sallies, or sometimes picked from the ground.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Empidonax flavescens". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d del Hoyo, J. Elliott, A. & Christie, D. (editors). (2004) Handbook of the Birds of the World. Volume 9: Cotingas to Pipits and Wagtails. Lynx Edicions. ISBN 84-87334-69-5
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