Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Zoothera interpres is found discontinuously from southern peninsular Thailand and Malaysia, through Borneo (including Brunei Darussalam), Sumatra and Java, to Lombok, Sumbawa and Flores, in Indonesia. It may also be a rare resident on several of the south-west Sulu Islands and Basilan in the central-southern Philippines. It is described as "generally rare and scarce" (Clement and Hathway 2000) throughout, and there are very few records from Sumatra and Kalimantan in particular, although it is probably under-recorded to some extent. It was formerly not uncommon in the Lesser Sundas and in Sabah (Malaysia), but is thought to have undergone a rapid decline in recent years owing to logging and trapping for the cage bird trade.

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Range

S Thailand, Malaysia, Greater and Lesser Sundas and s Philippines.
  • Clements, J. F., T. S. Schulenberg, M. J. Iliff, D. Roberson, T. A. Fredericks, B. L. Sullivan, and C. L. Wood. 2014. The eBird/Clements checklist of birds of the world: Version 6.9. Downloaded from http://www.birds.cornell.edu/clementschecklist/download/

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It inhabits lowland primary deciduous and evergreen forest, often with a dense understorey, but has also been found in partially degraded forest and forest fragments (Clement and Hathway 2000). Usually forages for invertebrates on the ground, but occasionally seen in fruiting trees (Clement and Hathway 2000). Breeding takes place from April or May to about late July or August, but probably with regional variation (Clement and Hathway 2000). Nest with 2-3 eggs placed up to 4 m above the ground (Clement and Hathway 2000).


Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Zoothera interpres

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
NT
Near Threatened

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Symes, A. & Butchart, S.

Contributor/s
Butchart, S., Edwards, D., Hogberg, S. & Hornbuckle, J.

Justification
This species has been listed as Near Threatened owing to concerns that it is undergoing a moderately rapid population reduction, as a result of trapping for the bird trade, and forest loss and degradation. Trends in forest loss and trapping levels need monitoring, and its tolerance of degraded forest should be determined. With this information it may require uplisting to Vulnerable.

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Population

Population
The global population size has not been quantified, but the species is described as locally fairly common in the Lesser Sundas and Borneo, rare in Thailand and the Philippines and local and scarce in Peninsular Malaysia (del Hoyo et al. 2005).

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Threats

Major Threats
Significant habitat loss is ongoing throughout the lowland forest range of this species, and studies from Sabah indicate that it occurs at a much lower density in logged forest (D. Edwards in litt. 2007). In recent years it has been very heavily exploited for the cage-bird trade, raising fears of its extirpation from some islands in Nusa Tenggara (Clement and Hathway 2000).

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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Conservation Actions Underway
The species occurs within a number of protected areas.

Conservation Actions Proposed
Assess the extent to which bird trade is a threat. Monitor rates of forest loss. Further study its tolerance of forest degradation. Protect large areas of unlogged forest in areas where it occurs.

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Wikipedia

Chestnut-capped Thrush

The chestnut-capped thrush (Geokichla interpres) lives in forests and woodlands of Southeast Asia. It is a songbird species in the family Turdidae. Traditionally, it has included the Enggano thrush as a subspecies, but a recent review recommended treating them as separate. Consequently, the chestnut-capped thrush is monotypic.

The chestnut-capped thrush has a black back and a white belly with black spots. As its common name suggests, it has a chestnut cap. Its face is black with a white mark on the cheeks and another on the lores. The superficially similar chestnut-backed thrush is substantially larger when seen alongside one another, and has a black crown and rufous back, whereas the Enggano thrush has an olive-ochre back and little or no white on the lores and auriculars.

The chestnut-capped thrush is very rare in zoos. According to ISIS, Chester Zoo had the only female outside of Asia, until she died in 2007. However, small numbers have been held in private European aviaries since the mid-1990s and very small numbers remain as of late 2009.

It was formerly classified as a species of Least Concern by the IUCN.[2] New research has shown it to be rarer than previously believed. Consequently, it was uplisted to Near Threatened status in 2008.[3]

Footnotes[edit]

References[edit]

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