Overview

Brief Summary

Biology

Pairs maintain territories throughout the year, although males have been observed roosting communally where territories adjoin (2). The breeding season is reportedly from January to May, and possibly again in September. Positioned on a rock ledge or tree fork next to waterfalls or rapids, the large, compact nests are constructed out of green moss and fern roots, lined with grass and rootlets (2) (3). Clutches seem to contain one to two eggs (2). This extremely shy, elusive species forages on the ground, commonly at the margins of water, where it feeds mainly on insects, but also on snails, small reptiles (geckos and lizards) and amphibians (frogs) (2) (4).
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Description

The male of this small, dark thrush native to Sri Lanka is a beautiful, velvety black spangled with a lustrous blue sheen, particularly on the inner wing-coverts (shoulders), forehead and above the eyes (2) (3). By contrast, the female is dull brown above with a mute purplish-blue shoulder-patch, and reddish-brown underparts, rump and undertail-coverts (2). Juveniles are similar to adult females but have more rusty-brown underparts and narrow buff streaking on the head, neck and breast (2) (3).
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Distribution

Range Description

Myophonus blighi is endemic to Sri Lanka, where it is restricted to the central mountains. It has always been considered scarce and is thought to have a declining, increasingly fragmented population of no more than a few thousand individuals.

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Range

Mountain ravines of Sri Lanka.
  • Clements, J. F., T. S. Schulenberg, M. J. Iliff, D. Roberson, T. A. Fredericks, B. L. Sullivan, and C. L. Wood. 2014. The eBird/Clements checklist of birds of the world: Version 6.9. Downloaded from http://www.birds.cornell.edu/clementschecklist/download/

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Range

Confined to the central mountains of Sri Lanka (3).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is a secretive, ground-dwelling bird confined to dense mountain forests above c.900 m, usually close to streams, especially in ravines and gorges. Breeding is from January until May, and possibly again in September, on rock ledges next to waterfalls or rapids and also in the forks of trees.


Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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This secretive, ground-dwelling bird is restricted to dense, relatively undisturbed evergreen mountain forests above around 900 metres, although it is now found mainly between 1,200 and 2,100 metres (2) (3) (4). The bird is usually found close to rapid-flowing water and streams, particularly in ravines and gorges (3) (4).
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EN
Endangered

Red List Criteria
B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v);C2a(i)

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s
Samarawickrama, V. & Kaluthota, C.

Justification
This species is listed as Endangered because it has a very small, severely fragmented population and range, which are undergoing a continuing decline as a result of degradation and destruction of upland forest.


History
  • Endangered (EN)
  • Endangered (EN)
  • Endangered (EN)
  • Endangered (EN)
  • Endangered (EN)
  • Endangered (EN)
  • Threatened (T)