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Overview

Brief Summary

Like many warblers, reed warblers live up to their name. No reed, no reed warbler. They have a preference for large marshes, however when the territory is already occupied, they look for other areas rich in reed. They can even be found in polder ditches as long as there is reed vegetation. They build their nest as a deep bowl between the reed stalks. Reed warblers feed on aquatic and land insects, spiders, worms and snails.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Source: IUCN

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Life History and Behavior

Life Expectancy

Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

Maximum longevity: 12.9 years (wild)
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© Joao Pedro de Magalhaes

Source: AnAge

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Acrocephalus scirpaceus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 10
Specimens with Barcodes: 21
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data: Acrocephalus scirpaceus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 10 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.  Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

AACCGATGACTATTCTCAGCCAATCACAAAGACATCGGCACCTTATACCTAATCTTTGGTGCATGAGCCGGAATAGTAGGCACTGCCCTC---AGCCTTCTCATTCGAGCGGAGCTAGGCCAACCCGGCGCCCTCTTGGGAGAC---GACCAGGTGTACAACGTGGTCGTCACAGCCCATGCATTTGTGATAATCTTCTTTATAGTTATGCCAATCATGATCGGAGGATTCGGAAACTGACTGGTGCCTCTAATA---ATTGGAGCCCCAGACATGGCATTCCCCCGAATAAACAACATGAGCTTCTGACTCCTACCACCCTCCTTCCTGCTACTGCTAGCCTCATCAACAGTCGAGGCGGGGGCAGGAACAGGCTGAACCGTATACCCTCCCCTGGCTGGCAACCTAGCCCACGCTGGAGCCTCAGTCGACCTA---GCTATCTTCTCCCTCCACCTAGCGGGGATCTCATCAATCCTAGGGGCAATTAACTTCATCACAACAGCCATCAACATAAAACCACCTGCCCTGTCCCAATACCAAACCCCCCTATTTGTGTGATCAGTCTTAATCACCGCAGTACTACTCCTGCTATCTCTCCCAGTACTAGCTGCC---GGCATCACAATGCTACTCACCGACCGAAACCTCAACACCACTTTCTTCGACCCTGCAGGAGGAGGGGACCCCGTACTCTACCAACACCTCTTCTGATTCTTCGGTCACCCAGAAGTATACATCCTAATCCTGCCCGGATTCGGAATCATCTCCCACGTAGTAGCCTACTACGCAGGAAAAAAA---GAACCATTCGGCTATATAGGAATAGTATGGGCCATACTATCCATCGGATTCCTTGGGTTCATTGTATGAGCACATCACATGTTTACAGTAGGAATAGACGTGGACACCCGAGCATACTTCACATCCGCTACTATGATCATTGCCATCCCAACCGGAATCAAAGTATTTAGCTGACTA---GCAACA
-- end --

Download FASTA File
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). Despite the fact that the population trend appears to be decreasing, the decline is not believed to be sufficiently rapid to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size is extremely large, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
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Status in Egypt

Migrant breeder, Regular passage visitor and winter visitor?

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© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

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Population

Population
In Europe, the breeding population is estimated to number 2700000-5000000 breeding pairs, equating to 8100000-15000000 individuals (BirdLife International 2004). Europe forms 50-74% of the global range, so a very preliminary estimate of the global population size is 10900000-30000000 individuals, although further validation of this estimate is needed.

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Source: IUCN

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Wikipedia

Eurasian Reed Warbler

The Eurasian Reed Warbler, or just Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) is an Old World warbler in the genus Acrocephalus. It breeds across Europe into temperate western Asia. It is migratory, wintering in sub-Saharan Africa.

This small passerine bird is a species found almost exclusively in reed beds, usually with some bushes. The 3-5 eggs are laid in a basket nest in reeds. The chicks fledge after 10 or 11 days. This species is usually monogamous.[2]

The Eurasian Reed Warbler looks similar to the Great Reed Warbler, but the Great Reed Warbler is larger in size and has a stronger supercilium.

The Eurasian Reed Warbler is one of the species that are brood parasitised by the Common Cuckoo.

This is a medium-sized warbler, 12.5-14 cm in length. The adult has an unstreaked brown back and buff underparts. The forehead is flattened, and the bill is strong and pointed. The sexes are identical, as with most warblers, but young birds are richer buff below. Like most warblers, it is insectivorous, but will take other small food items, including berries.

The song is a slow, chattering jit-jit-jit with typically acrocephaline whistles and mimicry added.

Song Diaccia Botrona Marsh, Italy

References[edit]

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Acrocephalus scirpaceus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013. 
  2. ^ Leisler, B. & Wink, Michael (2000): Frequencies of multiple paternity in three Acrocephalus species (Aves: Sylviidae) with different mating systems (A. palustris, A. arundinaceus, A. paludicola). Ethology, Ecology & Evolution 12: 237-249. PDF fulltext
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