Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is endemic to the Arfak and Tamrau Mountains of the Vogelkop peninsula in north-west Irian Jaya, Indonesia (Frith and Beehler 1998).
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Range

W New Guinea (Arfak Mts.). Sight record from Tamrau Mts..

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The species is a rather poorly known inhabitant of montane forest, between 1,700-2,250 m (Frith and Beehler 1998).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s

Justification
Although this species may have a restricted range, it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
The global population size has not been quantified, but the species is reported to be common at higher elevations near Manokwari (Frith and Beehler 1998).

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
The extensive rainforests within the species range remain largely undisturbed owing to their geographical isolation and the low density and traditional lifestyle of the human population, although deforestation is occurring in the hills of the Tamrau and Arfak mountain ranges (Sujatnika et al. 1995). Adult males are hunted locally for their skins (Gibbs 1993).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Conservation Actions Underway
There is one relatively substantial protected area in the Arfak and Tamrau mountains, the Pegunungan Arfak Nature Reserve, which currently covers 683 km2 but has been proposed for extension (Stattersfield et al. 1998). In addition there is a huge protected area proposed for the Tamrau mountains, the Pegunungan Tamrau Nature Reserve (Sujatnika et al. 1995).
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Wikipedia

Arfak Astrapia

The Arfak Astrapia (Astrapia nigra) is a large, approximately 76 cm long, black bird of paradise with an iridescent purple, green and bronze plumage. The male has a very long broad tail, velvety black breast feathers and extremely complex head plumage, although it often appears black. The male displays upside down. The female is a blackish brown with pale barring on its abdomen.

Levaillant of France described this bird as L’Incomparable or Incomparable Bird of Paradise.

Drawing

An Indonesian endemic, the Arfak Astrapia is restricted to the Arfak Mountains in Vogelkop Peninsula, West Papua. The diet consists mainly of pandanus fruits.

In the wild, the bird has hybridised with the Black Sicklebill creating offspring that were once considered a distinct species, the Elliot's Sicklebill Epimachus ellioti. While some ornithologists still believe that this bird is a distinct species, possibly critically endangered or even extinct, many now think it was a hybrid between the two species.

Protected by its geographical isolation and undisturbed forests home, the Arfak Astrapia is evaluated as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It is listed on Appendix II of CITES.

References[edit]

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