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Overview

Brief Summary

occurance

it is found in the indian subcontinent,parts of southeast asia is a member of the thrush family.and is nor a magpie or robin.it looks like.subspecies-ceylonnensis,andamensis,mindanensis,javensis and other.it is also found in eastern pakistan,china,thailand,malaysia.they are introduced in australia.iti s found closely to humans.

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Comprehensive Description

Summary

"A common black and white bird, mostly seen close to the ground, hopping along branches or foraging in leaf-litter on the ground with cocked tail."
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Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: Native to southern Asia and the Malay Archipelago, to 2000 m (Sibley and Monroe 1990). Observed feeding young on Kauai, Hawaii, in 1989, the first reliable sighting on Kauai since 1967 (Eilerts and Duhon 1990).

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Physical Description

Morphology

A trim black-and-white bird with cocked tail as in the Robin. In the female the black portions are replaced by brown and slaty-grey.
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Size

About that of the Bulbul.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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General Habitat

Singly or pairs about human habitations.
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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Behaviour

"The Magpie-Robin is also amongst the more familiar birds found about the haunts of Man. In the non-breeding season it is shy and quiet, skulking about in undergrowth and brushwood and only uttering a plaintive swee-ee and harsh chr-r, chr-r notes from time to time. But it is one of our finest songsters. With the approach of the hot weather the cock recovers his voice, and in his spruce pied livery he is a striking and happy figure as from the topmost twigs of a leafless tree, a gate-post or hedge he gladdens the short-lived cool of a May morning with his continuous torrent of far-reaching song. The melody is punctuated bv a constant spreading and upward jerks of his white-fringed tail. Singing continues intermittently throughout the clay. He is an accomplish mimic besides, and imitates the calls of many other birds to perfection. Although chiefly arboreal, the bird also feeds largely on the ground, hopping about and picking up crickets, grasshoppers, ants, caterpillars and a host of other insects. Occasionally one will make short sallies into the air after winged prey. Silk Cotton and Coral blossoms are visited regularly for the sake of the sugary nectar. During the breeding season the males love to show off before their mates and indulge in much spreading of tails and ludicrous pufling-out, strutting and nodding. They become very pugnacious and resent the intrusion of other cocks into their territory."
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Reproduction

"The season over most of its range is between April and July ; earlier in the south. The nest is a pad of grass, rootlets and hair. It is placed in a hole in a wall, tree-trunk or branch, between 5 and 20 feet from the ground. The eggs — three to five- are some shade of pale blue-green, blotched and mottled with reddish-brown."
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Copsychus saularis

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 53 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

CTCTACCTGATCTTCGGCGCATGAGCCGGAATGGTGGGTACTGCCCTA---AGCCTCCTCATCCGAGCAGAACTGGGCCAACCAGGCGCCTTACTGGGAGAC---GACCAAATCTATAACGTAGTAGTCACAGCCCATGCCTTCGTGATAATCTTCTTCATAGTTATACCAATTATGATCGGAGGATTTGGAAACTGACTGGTCCCTCTAATA---ATCGGAGCACCGGACATAGCATTCCCCCGAATAAACAACATAAGCTTCTGACTACTCCCCCCATCCTTCCTACTCCTCCTAGCCTCCTCCACAGTCGAAGCCGGAGCAGGAACAGGTTGAACGGTCTACCCCCCTCTCGCTGGTAACCTAGCTCATGCTGGAGCTTCAGTAGATTTA---GCCATCTTCTCACTCCACCTGGCCGGTATCTCTTCAATTTTAGGCGCCATTAATTTCATCACAACAGCAATCAACATAAAACCACCTGCCCTTTCACAATACCAAACCCCACTATTCGTTTGATCTGTACTAATCACTGCAGTCCTACTCCTCCTGTCTCTCCCTGTCCTCGCCGCT---GGCATCACCATACTTCTCACCGACCGTAACCTAAACACCACCTTCTTTGACCCAGCAGGGGGAGGAGACCCAGTACTTTACCAACACCTC------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------TTC
-- end --

Download FASTA File

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Copsychus saularis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 53
Specimens with Barcodes: 58
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

History
  • Least Concern (LC)
  • Least Concern (LC)
  • Least Concern (LC)
  • Lower Risk/least concern (LR/lc)
  • Lower Risk/least concern (LR/lc)
  • Lower Risk/least concern (LR/lc)
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