Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Spanish (7) (learn more)

Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Salpinctes obsoletus is a North American species, distributed from western Canada through western U.S.A. to Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Costa Rica. The subspecies exsul, endemic to Mexico's San Benedicto Island, was driven extinct by a volcanic eruption in 1952 (del Hoyo et al. 2005).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Breeding

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Range: BREEDS: south-central British Columbia east to southern Saskatchewan, east to northwestern North Dakota, southern South Dakota, central Nebraska, western Oklahoma, and central Texas, and south to southern Baja California and through Central America to Costa Rica. A pair bred near Churchill, Manitoba, in 1988. WINTERS: northern California east to southern Utah, south to Arizona, New Mexico, southern Texas and south through breeding range, occasionally in northwestern and central U.S. (Terres 1980)

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Size

Length: 15 cm

Weight: 17 grams

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Comments: In arid or semi-arid habitat. In shrubby areas in rocky canyons and cliffs, rock slides, boulder-strewn slopes, arroyos with sparse vegetation. Seen around concrete and stone buildings. Nests in gopher burrows, rock crevices, cavities under rocks, adobe buildings, etc. Nest sites may be reused in subsequent years. Nest is made of grasses, rootlets, and plant stems, lined with fur, hair and feathers, and built on a foundation of small flat stones (e.g., see Merola 1995).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Migration

Non-Migrant: Yes. At least some populations of this species do not make significant seasonal migrations. Juvenile dispersal is not considered a migration.

Locally Migrant: Yes. At least some populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: Yes. At least some populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

Breeding populations in northern interior U.S. and southern Canada are migratory.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Trophic Strategy

Comments: Primary diet probably insects and spiders.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Reproduction

In New Mexico, nest building was observed as early as early March (Merola 1995). Clutch size is 4-10 in north (usually 5-6); 4 in Costa Rica (Stiles and Skutch 1989). Incubation, by female, lasts about 12-14 days (Merola 1995). Fledging occurs in 14-16 days (Merola 1995). Young are tended by both parents. In New Mexico, some pairs produced three broods in one season (Merola 1995). Male may tend brood while female starts new clutch (Merola 1995).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Salpinctes obsoletus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 3 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

CCTATACCTAATCTTCGGCGCATGAGCCGGAATAGTAGGCACCGCCCTAAGCCTTCTCATCCGAGCAGAACTAGGACAACCCGGCGCCCTGCTAGGGGACGACCAAGTCTACAACGTAGTTGTCACAGCTCATGCTTTTGTAATAATTTTTTTCATAGTTATACCCATCATAATCGGAGGGTTTGGAAACTGACTAGTCCCCCTAATAATTGGAGCCCCCGACATAGCATTCCCCCGAATAAACAACATAAGCTTCTGACTACTTCCCCCATCCTTCCTCCTACTTCTAGCCTCCTCCACCGTCGAGGCAGGTGTCGGAACAGGCTGAACAGTCTACCCCCCTCTAGCAGGAAACCTAGCCCATGCCGGAGCTTCAGTTGACCTCGCCATTTTCTCTCTACACCTAGCCGGCATCTCCTCCATTCTAGGCGCAATCAACTTCATTACAACAGCAATCAACATAAAACCTCCCGCCCTGTCCCAATATCAAACACCCCTGTTCGTTTGATCCGTCCTAATTACTGCTGTCCTACTCCTTCTCTCCCTTCCCGTCCTAGCCGCAGGCATTACCATGCTACTAACAGACCGAAATCTTAACACTACCTTTTTCGACCCTGCAGGAGGAGGAGACCCCGTCCTCTACCAACATCTGTTTTGATNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
-- end --

Download FASTA File

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Salpinctes obsoletus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). Despite the fact that the population trend appears to be decreasing, the decline is not believed to be sufficiently rapid to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size is extremely large, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5B - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population Trend
Decreasing
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Rock wren

This article is about the North American bird. For the New Zealand bird, see New Zealand rockwren.

The rock wren (Salpinctes obsoletus) is a small songbird of the wren family. It is the only species in the genus Salpinctes.

The 12 cm long adults have grey-brown upperparts with small black and white spots and pale grey underparts with a light brown rump. They have a light grey line over the eye, a long slightly decurved thin bill, a long barred tail and dark legs.

Their breeding habitat is dry rocky locations, including canyons, from southwestern Canada south to Costa Rica. This bird builds a cup nest in a crevice or cavity, usually among rocks.

These birds are permanent residents in the south of their range, but northern populations migrate to warmer areas from the central United States and southwest Canada southwards. They are occasional vagrants in the eastern United States.

These birds actively hunt on the ground, around and under objects, probing with their bill as their extraction tool. They mainly eat insects and spiders.

This bird's song is a trill, becoming more varied during the nesting season.

References[edit]

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!