Overview

Brief Summary

 The Cut-throat finch (Amadina fasciata), also known as the Ribbon finch is a common species of Estrildid finch endemic to Africa. 

Cut throat finches have a pale brown base plumage with specks of black, more abundant over the head spreading to the wings, back , flanks, and belly. Their chin and cheeks are white. Males have a brown patched belly with white scale-like patterns. Males also have a red ribbon-like marking on its throat which also looks like it's been cut, hence the name. Both sexes have pinkish flesh legs.

Cut-throat finches are found throughout Africa and was also introduced in Portugal.

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
The global population size has not been quantified, but the species is described as common or locally common (Clement 1999).

Population Trend
Stable
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Wikipedia

Cut-throat Finch

The cut-throat finch (Amadina fasciata) is a common species of estrildid finch found throughout Africa; it is also known as the bearded finch, the ribbon finch, the cut throat, and the weaver finch.

The cut-throat finch has plumage that is pale, sandy brown with flecks of black all over. They have a black-brown tail, a thick white chin and cheeks, and a chestnut brown patch on the belly. The legs are a pink fleshy colour. The adult male has a bright red band across its throat (thus the name "cut throat"), while the male juveniles have a slightly duller red band.

It has an estimated global extent of occurrence of 3,300,000 km². It is found in Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, the Republic of Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Portugal (introduced), Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Reproduction[edit]

Cut-throat finches usually use nests constructed by other birds . A clutch usually consists of 4 to 6 white eggs, which hatch after an incubation period of 12 days.[2]

Origin[edit]

Origin and phylogeny has been obtained by Antonio Arnaiz-Villena et al..[3] Estrildinae may have originated in India and dispersed thereafter (towards Africa and Pacific Ocean habitats). Its closest relative is the red-headed finch.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Amadina fasciata". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013. 
  2. ^ Mclachlan, G. R.; Liversidge, R. (1978). "821 White-throated Seed-eater". Roberts Birds of South Africa. Illustrated by Lighton, N. C. K.; Newman, K.; Adams, J.; Gronvöld, H (4th ed.). The Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund. p. 585. 
  3. ^ Arnaiz-Villena, A; Ruiz-del-Valle V; Gomez-Prieto P; Reguera R; Parga-Lozano C; Serrano-Vela I (2009). "Estrildinae Finches (Aves, Passeriformes) from Africa, South Asia and Australia: a Molecular Phylogeographic Study". The Open Ornithology Journal 2: 29–36. doi:10.2174/1874453200902010029. 
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