Overview

Distribution

Range

Extreme se Sudan to se Ethiopia, s Somalia, Kenya and n Tanzania.

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Physical Description

Type Information

Type for Uraeginthus cyanocephala
Catalog Number: USNM 118252
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Birds
Sex/Stage: Male; Adult
Preparation: Skin: Whole
Collector(s): W. Abbott
Year Collected: 1889
Locality: Mount Kilimanjaro, plains of, Useri River, Moshi, Kilimanjaro, Tanzania, Africa
  • Type: Richmond. April 1897. Auk. 14 (2): 157.
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© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Birds

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Source: IUCN

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has a very large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
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Source: IUCN

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Population

Population
The global population size has not been quantified, but the species is described as locally common (Clement 1999).

Population Trend
Stable
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Source: IUCN

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Wikipedia

Blue-capped Cordon-bleu

The blue-capped cordon-bleu (Uraeginthus cyanocephalus) is native to Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Sudan and Tanzania in East Africa. This small finch does fairly well in captivity given adequate conditions, however, breeding this finch is said to be quite difficult.

Habitat[edit]

The blue-capped cordon-bleu inhabits subtropical or tropical (lowland) dry grassland, shrubland and desert. It has an estimated global extent of occurrence of 390,000 km².

Feature[edit]

The finch is an omnivorous passerine, eating seeds and small insects. Most of this species do not exceed 7.5 cm (3 in.) in length and are quiet relative to other finches.

Blue-capped males (pictured at right) have blue on the tops of their heads and tend to be more vivid in color. On female blue-caps the light brown coloration on the wings extends to the nape of the neck and over the top the head.

Origin[edit]

Origin and phylogeny has been obtained by Antonio Arnaiz-Villena et al.[2] Estrildinae may have originated in India and dispersed thereafter (towards Africa and Pacific Ocean habitats).

References[edit]

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Uraeginthus cyanocephalus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013. 
  2. ^ Arnaiz-Villena, A; Ruiz-del-Valle V; Gomez-Prieto P; Reguera R; Parga-Lozano C; Serrano-Vela I (2009). "Estrildinae Finches (Aves, Passeriformes) from Africa, South Asia and Australia: a Molecular Phylogeographic Study". The Open Ornithology Journal 2: 29–36. doi:10.2174/1874453200902010029. 


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