Overview

Distribution

Subspecies and Distribution:


    * bicolor (Scopoli, 1786) - coasts and small islands from Andaman and Nicobar Is, W Myanmar, Malay Peninsula, peninsular and coastal Thailand and Cambodia through Indonesia and Philippines to W Papuan Is (Salawati, Misool) and coastal Vogelkop (W New Guinea). * melanura (G. R. Gray, 1860) - Moluccas, on Bacan, Halmahera, Obi, Seram, Buru, Ambon, Kai Is, Moti and Muor; also Komodo and Tanimbar Is (Lesser Sundas).


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Physical Description

Type Information

Type for Ducula bicolor
Catalog Number: USNM A14786
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Birds
Sex/Stage: Male; Adult
Preparation: Skin: Whole
Collector(s): Collector Unknown
Year Collected: 1842
Locality: Marongas Island, Island Just NW of Jolo On Jolo Island, Sulu Province, Sulu Archipelago, Philippines, Asia
  • Type: Peale. 1848. U.S. Exploring Expedition. 8 (mamm. and orn.): 204, pl. lviii.
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Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Source: IUCN

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Trophic Strategy

Frugivorous, the most important were palms, nutmegs, laurels. In lower canopy, usually singly.

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Life History and Behavior

Behavior

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2014

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). Despite the fact that the population trend appears to be decreasing, the decline is not believed to be sufficiently rapid to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size is very large, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

History
  • 2012
    Least Concern
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Not Threatened.

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Population

Population
The population in Australia is estimated to number 500,000 individuals (S. J. Garnett and G. C. L. Dutson in litt. 2008).

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Wikipedia

Pied imperial pigeon

The pied imperial pigeon (Ducula bicolor) is a relatively large, pied species of pigeon. It is found in forest, woodland, mangrove, plantations and scrub in Southeast Asia, ranging from Myanmar and Thailand south to Java and east to the Philippines and the Bird's Head Peninsula in New Guinea. It is mainly found on small islands and in coastal regions.[2] It remains locally common, and is therefore considered to be of least concern by BirdLife International and IUCN.[1]

Taxonomy[edit]

Pied imperial pigeon at the National Aviary. Notice the lack of black spotting to the undertail coverts.

Its taxonomy is confusing and remains unsettled. It has sometimes included the Torresian, yellowish and silver-tipped imperial pigeons as subspecies.[2] The widespread nominate subspecies of the pied imperial pigeon differs from all these by its plain white thighs and undertail coverts (though often with a dark spot at the very tip), and its narrowly dark-tipped bluish bill. For comparison, the other species' have black-spotted undertail coverts and thighs (spotting mainly near thighs in silver-tipped imperial pigeon), the bill of the Torresian imperial pigeon is greenish-yellow, and the bills of the yellowish and silver-tipped imperial pigeons are bluish at the base and yellowish at the tip. Furthermore, the yellowish imperial pigeon has a distinctive yellowish tinge to its plumage[2] (some pied imperial pigeons may also appear yellowish, but infrequently to the same extent), and the silver-tipped imperial pigeon has silvery-grey remiges.[3] However, the taxon melanura of the Moluccas, which usually is considered a subspecies of the pied imperial pigeon, resembles the Torresian imperial pigeon in bill, thighs and undertail coverts, but has a significantly broader black tail-tip.[3] Consequently, some have suggested it should be placed under the Torresian imperial pigeon, while others have suggested it should be considered an entirely separate species, D. melanura[3] (for which the name black imperial pigeon has been used – an unfortunate choice, as only the tail has significantly more black than the other members of this group, and the name black imperial pigeon usually has been used for D. melanochroa).[4] Yet others have considered melanura to be invalid, instead believing it only is a morph of D. b. bicolor, as both types can be found on some islands.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b BirdLife International (2012). "Ducula bicolor". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c Baptista, L. F., P. W. Trail, & H. M. Horblit (1997). Family Columbidae (Pigeons and Dovexs). pp. 60-243 in: del Hoya, J., A. Elliott, & J. Sargatal. eds. (1997). Handbook of the Birds of the World. Vol. 4. Sangrouse to Cuckoos. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona. ISBN 84-87334-22-9
  3. ^ a b c d Coates, B. J., & K. D. Bishop (1997). A Guide to the Birds of Wallacea. Dove Publications Pty. Ltd. ISBN 0-9590257-3-1
  4. ^ Gill, F., M. Wright, & D. Donsker (2009). IOC World Bird Names. Version 2.1. Accessed 03-07-2009
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