Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Spanish (1) (learn more)

Overview

Distribution

Range Description

The Magellanic Diving-petrel is found on the southern tip of South America, from south-central Chile to the extreme south of Argentina1.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Range

Islands and fiords of s Chile, s Argentina and extreme se Brazil.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Geographic Range

Magellanic diving petrels are found in the coastal and nearshore areas of southern Chile, Tierra del Fuego, and southern Argentina. They are found in fjords and coastal waters up to 125 km from shore.

Biogeographic Regions: neotropical (Native ); atlantic ocean (Native ); pacific ocean (Native )

  • Brooke, M. 2004. Albatrosses and Petrels across the World. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

Magellanic diving petrels are about 19 cm long and recorded weights are from 145 to 174 g (although this is based on a small sample size). They are similar in appearance to other diving petrels, with black plumage dorsally and white plumage on the ventral surfaces. They have grey mottling on their flank and sides of their breasts. Soon after a molt, feathers on their back, rumps, and wings have white tips to them. They have a white line that runs from just above each eye, laterally down the neck to join with the white of the breast and flanks. Their bill is black and the feet and legs are blue, with black webbing. They are distinguished from other diving petrels by the white markings that run from their eyes along the neck and by dimensions of the bill. Wings are from 120 to 133 mm long, bill lengths are from 15 to 17 mm, and tails are from 34 to 44 mm. There are no described subspecies and sexual dimorphism is not reported. Like other diving petrels, they are able to store and transport prey items in a gular pouch, formed by a distensible portion of skin in the throat. This characteristic is hinted at by their generic name Pelecanoides, referring to its similarity to the gular sac of pelicans (Pelecanidae).

Range mass: 145 to 174 g.

Average length: 19 cm.

Other Physical Features: endothermic ; homoiothermic; bilateral symmetry

Sexual Dimorphism: sexes alike

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is found mainly over inshore and offshore waters, feeding by diving under water both from the surface and the air. Breeding begins in November or December in colonies, mostly on small inshore islands in channels and fjords. It has been recorded up to 128 km from land (del Hoyo et al. 1992).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Marine
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Magellanic diving petrels are mainly found foraging in nearshore, coastal waters. They breed on small, nearshore islands in coastal channels and fjords. Breeding islands generally have soft soil and some vegetation. Magellanic diving petrels dig nesting burrows in this soil and overhanging vegetation may help to mask the burrow entrance.

Habitat Regions: temperate

Aquatic Biomes: coastal

  • del Hoyo, J., A. Elliott, J. Sargatal. 1992. Handbook of the Birds of the World, Volume I. Barcelona: Lynx Edicions.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Trophic Strategy

Food Habits

Magellanic diving petrels capture aquatic invertebrates, especially crustaceans, and small fish by diving, either from flight or from a surface dive. Like their diving petrel cousins, they are likely to be strong in underwater pursuit, propelling themselves underwater with their wings and steering with their tails. They seem to feed mainly in coastal, nearshore waters.

Animal Foods: fish; aquatic crustaceans

Primary Diet: carnivore (Piscivore , Eats non-insect arthropods)

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

Ecosystem Roles

Magellanic diving petrels are important predators of marine invertebrates and small fish in the coastal channels and fjords they inhabit.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Predation

Like other diving petrels, they seem to dive in response to threats rather than fly. They seem to escape much predation by gulls and skuas by visiting their nesting colonies mainly at night, landing briefly outside of their burrows and making a quick retreat to the safety of the burrow upon arrival. If they are forced to walk any distance on land to their burrow, there is a high probability that they will fall prey to larger birds.

Known Predators:

Anti-predator Adaptations: cryptic

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Communication and Perception

There is no information on communication in Magellanic diving petrels. They are likely to be similar to their close relatives, common diving petrels (Pelecanoides urinatrix), which are silent, generally, at sea but very vocal at breeding colonies at night.

Communication Channels: acoustic

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life Expectancy

Lifespan/Longevity

Magellanic diving petrel longevity has not been documented, although it is presumed to be similar to that of common diving petrels.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Reproduction

There is no information on mating in Magellanic diving petrels. Like their relatives, they are thought to be monogamous, with pairs occupying nesting burrows in small territories at breeding colonies.

Mating System: monogamous

There is very little information on breeding in Magellanic diving petrels. They seem to nest in burrows among vegetation on coastal, channel islands throughout their range. Eggs are laid from November to December and fledglings have been observed in March. Adults have a post-nuptial molt from April to June. Females lay a single egg. Other aspects of their reproduction are probably similar to common diving petrels.

Breeding interval: Magellanic diving petrels breed once yearly.

Breeding season: Magellanic diving petrels seem to breed from November to December.

Range eggs per season: 1 to 1.

Key Reproductive Features: seasonal breeding ; gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate)

Males and females both incubate, brood, feed, and protect their single young until they become independent.

Parental Investment: altricial ; pre-fertilization (Provisioning, Protecting: Female); pre-hatching/birth (Provisioning: Female, Protecting: Male, Female); pre-weaning/fledging (Provisioning: Male, Female, Protecting: Male, Female); pre-independence (Provisioning: Male, Female, Protecting: Male, Female)

  • Brooke, M. 2004. Albatrosses and Petrels across the World. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • del Hoyo, J., A. Elliott, J. Sargatal. 1992. Handbook of the Birds of the World, Volume I. Barcelona: Lynx Edicions.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Pelecanoides magellani

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There is 1 barcode sequence available from BOLD and GenBank.   Below is the sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen.  Other sequences that do not yet meet barcode criteria may also be available.

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNGAGCTGGTATAGTTGGAACCGCCCTTAGCCTACTTATCCGTGCAGAACTTGGACAACCAGGAACCCTTTTAGGAGACGACCAGATCTATAATGTAATCGTCACCGCCCATGCTTTCGTAATAATCTTCTTTATGGTGATACCCATTATAATTGGCGGATTTGGAAATTGACTTGTACCCCTAATAATCGGTGCTCCTGATATAGCATTTCCACGTATAAATAATATAAGCTTTTGACTACTACCCCCATCCTTTCTCTTACTACTAGCCTCATCCACAGTAGAAGCAGGGGCAGGAACAGGATGAACCGTATATCCCCCCCTAGCAGGTAACATAGCCCATGCTGGAGCTTCAGTCGACCTAGCCATTTTCTCACTCCATTTAGCAGGTATTTCTTCTATTCTAGGAGCAATTAATTTTATCACAACAGCTATCAACATAAAACCCCCAGCCCTCTCACAATATCAAACTCCCCTATTTGTGTGATCCGTACTTATCACCGCCGTCTTACTCTTACTATCACTGCCAGTCCTAGCTGCAGGGATCACCATACTACTAACAGATCGAAACCTAAACACCACATTCTTTGACCCAGCTGGTGGAGGAGACCCCATCTTATACCAGCACCTCTTCTGATTCTTCGGCCATCCAGAAGTTTACATCCTAATCCTC
-- end --

Download FASTA File
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Pelecanoides magellani

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has a very large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). Despite the fact that the population trend appears to be decreasing, the decline is not believed to be sufficiently rapid to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size may be moderately small to large, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Magellanic diving petrels have a large distribution and are considered common throughout their range. They are listed as "least concern" by the IUCN.

US Migratory Bird Act: no special status

US Federal List: no special status

CITES: no special status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: least concern

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
Brooke (2004) estimated the global population to number tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands of individuals.

Population Trend
Decreasing
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Economic Importance for Humans: Negative

There are no adverse effects of Magellanic diving petrels on humans.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Economic Importance for Humans: Positive

Magellanic diving petrels are important members of nearshore marine environments throughout their range and may attract ecotourism interest.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Magellanic diving petrel

The Magellanic diving petrel (Pelecanoides magellani) is a diving petrel, one of four very similar auk-like small petrels of the southern oceans. This species occurs around the coasts of southernmost South America.

This 20 cm bird is the easiest of its family to identify at sea. Like other diving petrels, it is a compact bird, mainly black above and white below, and similar in shape and size to a little auk, the resemblances with that unrelated seabird being due to convergent evolution, since both dive for fish.

However, the Magellanic diving petrel is the only species with white fringes to the upperpart feathers, and a sharply defined face pattern, so with reasonable views it can be distinguished from its relatives. Sexes are similar, but juveniles lack the white upperpart fringes.

These birds nest in colonies on islands. One white egg is laid in a burrow in turf or soft soil. They are nocturnal at the breeding colonies.

References[edit]

  • Harrison, Peter (1996). Seabirds of the World. Princeton: Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-01551-1. 
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!