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Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is restricted to the coast of central Peru and Chile. Although the population may currently exceed 500,000 mature individuals (del Hoyo et al. 1992), this is a fraction of former numbers and numbers fluctuate greatly in association with El Niño, and with numbers of schooling anchoveta Engraulis ringens.

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Source: IUCN

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Range

Pacific coast of s Ecuador to s Chile.

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It breeds in large colonies on rocky coasts, feeding in shallow offshore waters along the coast on small schooling fish (del Hoyo et al. 1992).


Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
  • Marine
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Pelecanus thagus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There is 1 barcode sequence available from BOLD and GenBank.   Below is the sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen.  Other sequences that do not yet meet barcode criteria may also be available.

CCTATACTTGGTCTTCGGCGCATGAGCCGGAATAGTTGGAACAGCCCTTAGCCTACTCATTCGGGCAGAACTAGGCCAGCCCGGAACCCTCCTGGGAGACGACCAAATCTATAATGTAATCGTCACTGCCCATGCCTTCGTAATAATCTTCTTCATAGTAATACCGATCATAATTGGAGGCTTTGGAAACTGACTAGTTCCCCTCATAATCGGCGCCCCGGACATAGCATTCCCACGCATAAACAACATAAGCTTCTGACTCCTACCCCCATCCTTCCTACTCCTCCTAGCCTCATCCACAGTAGAAGCGGGTGCAGGAACAGGATGAACTGTGTACCCCCCACTAGCTGGTAACCTAGCTCATGCCGGAGCCTCAGTGGATCTGGCTATCTTCTCGCTCCACTTAGCAGGGGTATCCTCTATTCTAGGCGCAATCAACTTCATTACAACCGCCATCAACATAAAACCACCAGCCCTATCACAATATCAAACTCCATTATTCGTATGATCCGTCCTCATCACTGCCGTCCTACTACTATTATCCCTCCCAGTCTTAGCCGCCGGCATCACCATACTCCTCACAGACCGAAACCTAAATACTACATTCTTCGACCCTGCTGGAGGAGGAGACCCAGTCCTATACCAACACTTATTCTGATTCTTTGGCCACCCAGAAGTCTANNNNNNNNNNNNN
-- end --

Download FASTA File
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Pelecanus thagus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
NT
Near Threatened

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s
Garcia-Godos, I., Jaramillo, A., Monteiro, A., Simeone, A. & Zavalaga, C.

Justification
Although the population of this species is now stable or perhaps even increasing, it is likely to still be recovering after dramatic declines in the El Nino year of 1998. It could suffer similar declines in the future if conditions were repeated, for these reasons it is classified as Near Threatened.

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Population

Population
The most recent population estimate places it at 100,000-1,000,000 individuals.

Population Trend
Increasing
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Threats

Major Threats
It is likely to have been as badly affected by the El Niño event of 1998 as other Humboldt Current species such as Inca Tern Larosterna inca, which declines over this period approached 30%. Pelicans are notoriously susceptible to disturbance at breeding colonies, either intentional (e.g. by fishermen), or unintentional (e.g. by tourists).

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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Conservation Actions Underway
None is known.

Conservation Actions Proposed
Survey to assess population size. Regularly monitor at certain sites throughout its range to determine population trends, particularly after El Niño years. Restrict access to important breeding colonies. Study the interactions between this species and the fisheries.

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Wikipedia

Peruvian Pelican

The Peruvian Pelican (Pelecanus thagus) is a member of the pelican family. It lives on the west coast of South America, from Lobos de Tierra Island in Peru to Pupuya Islet in Chile.

These birds are dark in colour with a white stripe from the top of the bill up to the crown and down the sides of the neck. They have long tufted feathers on the top of their heads. It used to be considered a subspecies of the Brown Pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis). The Peruvian birds are nearly twice the bulk of the Brown Pelican, averaging 15.4 lb (7 kg) in weight; they are also longer, measuring about 5 ft (1.5 m) overall.

The main breeding season occurs from September to March. Clutch size size is usually two or three eggs. Eggs are incubated for approximately 4 to 5 weeks, with the rearing period lasting about 3 months.

This bird feeds on several species of fish. It feeds by diving into the water from flight, like the Brown Pelican.

Its status was first evaluated for the IUCN Red List in 2008, being listed as Near threatened.[2]

Gallery[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

References[edit]

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