Overview

Comprehensive Description

Medium sized Falco, long legs unique in genus. Extremely variale in colour, ranging from pale to dark. Juvenile brown with buff forehead, throat and vent. Regional variation in size and colour.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© New Guinea Birds

Source: Birds of Papua New Guinea

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

Subspecies and Distribution:


    * novaeguineae (A. B. Meyer, 1894) - C & E New Guinea and coastal N Australia. * berigora Vigors & Horsfield, 1827 - E, C & N Australia and Tasmania. * occidentalis (Gould, 1844) - SW & CW Australia.


Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© New Guinea Birds

Source: Birds of Papua New Guinea

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Size

41-51 cm, male 316-590 g, large medium female 430-860 g, wingspan 89-109 cm

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© New Guinea Birds

Source: Birds of Papua New Guinea

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Medium sized Falco, long legs unique in genus. Extremely variale in colour, ranging from pale to dark. Juvenile brown with buff forehead, throat and vent. Regional variation in size and colour.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© New Guinea Birds

Source: Birds of Papua New Guinea

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Marine
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Open woodland, savana, grassland, farmalnd and desert. From sea-level to 2000 m in Australia. Rarely to 3000 m in NG. Nest in trees.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© New Guinea Birds

Source: Birds of Papua New Guinea

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Trophic Strategy

Mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, arthropods and carrions, rarely fish. Some seasonal variation in diet. Farages mostly by still-hunting from exposed perch, also by quertering and hovering.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© New Guinea Birds

Source: Birds of Papua New Guinea

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© New Guinea Birds

Source: Birds of Papua New Guinea

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life Expectancy

Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

Maximum longevity: 16 years (captivity)
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Joao Pedro de Magalhaes

Source: AnAge

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Reproduction

Apr-Sept in N, Aug-Oct in S. Solitary. Uses old stick nest of other raptor or Corvus in tree, rarely on tree fern. Usually 2-3 eggs, incubation 31-36 days. Chicks have pale rufous firs down, grey second down. Adults generally sedentary ro with local movements. Not globally threatened. CITES II. Common and widespread.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© New Guinea Birds

Source: Birds of Papua New Guinea

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Falco berigora

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). Despite the fact that the population trend appears to be decreasing, the decline is not believed to be sufficiently rapid to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size is very large, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Not Threatened.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© New Guinea Birds

Source: Birds of Papua New Guinea

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population Trend
Decreasing
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Brown falcon

A brown falcon used for falconry in Tasmania

The brown falcon (Falco berigora), also known as the brown hawk, is a member of the falcon genus found in the drier regions of Australia. Its specific name berigora is derived from an aboriginal name for the bird.

The flight and hunting methods of the brown falcon differ markedly from those of other falcons. Both its wing-beats and flight are relatively slow. It is usually seen quietly perched or flying, alternatively beating its wings and gliding with wings held in a shallow "V" position. It sometimes hovers rather inefficiently, especially on windy days, but it has the ability to soar to great heights.

The brown falcon does not hunt by chasing its prey in flight. Its main method of searching for its food is to sit quietly on a high perch such as a dead branch on a tree or power pole. It drops down on its prey and grabs it with its talons. The falcon also searches for prey whilst gliding and flying.

Description[edit]

Adults are usually 40 cm to 50 cm long. They are found in light and dark forms and a variety of intermediates. Animals typically have red-brown heads with narrow black streaks with a light crown and off white chin. Wings are a spotted red-brown with dark brown quills. Beaks are light blue/grey, eyes are brown. The falcons make a loud cackle call uttered frequently.

Breeding and habitat[edit]

Brown falcons breed from June - November usually in an old nest of another hawk species, they occasionally nest in hollow limbs of trees. The brown falcon lays between 2-5 eggs that have red and brown spots and blotches.

Brown falcons are found throughout Australia. Darker forms of the animal are usually found in arid areas. The brown falcon has been spotted in New Guinea.

Diet[edit]

The brown falcon eats small mammals, including house mice and young rabbits. It also eats small birds, lizards, snakes and a variety of invertebrates particularly caterpillars, grasshoppers, crickets and beetles. Insects form the bulk of the animals diet during winter and the falcons often chase the insects on the ground.

References[edit]

  • Birds of The World by Colin Harrison and Alan Greensmith.
  • Complete Book of Australian Birds Readers Digest

Gallery[edit]

Wild-bird attending prey, Pikedale, S. Queensland


Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!