Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Description

Length: 18 cm. Plumage: dark grey-brown above; white below; forehead and stripe from forehead to hindneck and throat white; two black bands on breast separated by white band; narrow white wingbar in spread wing. Immature like adult but with grey forehead and pale edges to dorsal feathers. Bare parts: iris pale brown, or hazel to yellowish brown; bill red at base with black tip; eyering red; feet and legs red-orange to pinkish grey. Habitat: lagoons, mangrove creeks and rocky seashores and inland waters. Breeding resident, <389><391><393>
  • Urban, E.K., C.H. Fry & S. Keith (1986). The Birds of Africa, Volume II. Academic Press, London.
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Behaviour The migratory status of this species is poorly known (del Hoyo et al. 1996) but some populations may undergo partial intra-African dispersive movements in response to rainfall (Urban et al. 1986, del Hoyo et al. 1996, Hockey et al. 2005). The species breeds opportunistically throughout the year although nesting usually peaks between April and September in the tropics and between July and December in the south (del Hoyo et al. 1996). It nests in solitary pairs with territories (Urban et al. 1986, del Hoyo et al. 1996) stretching 80-150 m along the shore (Hockey et al. 2005), and usually forages singly, in pairs or in small flocks of 6-10 up to 20 individuals (very rarely in larger groups of 40 individuals) (Urban et al. 1986). It roosts solitarily or in groups (del Hoyo et al. 1996), occasionally forming loose roosting flocks of more than one hundred individuals in the winter (Hockey et al. 2005). Habitat The species requires clear, firm sand, mud or gravel shores for nesting, foraging and roosting (Johnsgard 1981, del Hoyo et al. 1996). It inhabits the edges of inland freshwater lakes (del Hoyo et al. 1996), temporary or muddy pools (Johnsgard 1981, del Hoyo et al. 1996) and rivers (del Hoyo et al. 1996), streams with shingle banks (Johnsgard 1981), and the margins of artificial water-bodies (e.g. sewage tanks) (del Hoyo et al. 1996). It also occurs along the coast on the edges of intertidal mudflats (Johnsgard 1981, Langrand 1990), sandy beaches (Johnsgard 1981, del Hoyo et al. 1996), coastal lagoons, estuaries (del Hoyo et al. 1996, Hockey et al. 2005), tidal pools (Hockey et al. 2005), and mangroves (Langrand 1990) where shows a preference for the least saline areas (del Hoyo et al. 1996). Diet Its diet consists of adult and larval aquatic and terrestrial insects, crustaceans, small molluscs and worms (del Hoyo et al. 1996). Breeding site The nest is a simple scrape placed on sand, dry mud (del Hoyo et al. 1996), shingle (Hayman et al. 1986) or on rocks close to water (del Hoyo et al. 1996).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
  • Marine
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Source: IUCN

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Charadrius tricollaris

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 4
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2014

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend is not known, but the population is not believed to be decreasing sufficiently rapidly to approach the thresholds under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size is very large, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
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Source: IUCN

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Status in Egypt

Accidental visitor and casual breeder?

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Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

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Population

Population
The population is estimated to number 70,000-140,000 individuals (Wetlands International 2014).

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
The species may be susceptible to future outbreaks of avian botulism (Blaker 1967).
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Wikipedia

Three-banded plover

The three-banded plover, or three-banded sandplover (Charadrius tricollaris), is a small wader. This plover is resident in much of eastern and southern Africa and Madagascar, mainly on inland rivers, pools, and lakes. Its nest is a bare scrape on shingle. This species is often seen as single individuals, but it will form small flocks. It hunts by sight for insects, worms and other invertebrates. Three-banded plover has a sharp whistled weeet-weet call.

Description[edit]

The adult three-banded plover is 18 cm in length. It has long wings and a long tail, and therefore looks different from most other small plovers in flight, the exception being the closely related Forbes's plover that replaces it in west Africa.

The adult three-banded plover has medium brown upperparts, and the underparts are white except for the two black breast bands, separated by a white band, which give this species its common and scientific names. The head is strikingly patterned, with a black crown, white supercilia extending from the white forehead to meet on the back of the neck, and a grey face becoming brown on the neck. The eye ring and the base of the otherwise black bill are red.

The Madagascan subspecies C. t. bifrontatus has a grey band between the bill and the white forehead, and the sides of the head are grey. The sexes are similar, and the juveniles of the nominate and Madagascan subspecies also resemble the adults, although the forehead is brownish for a short time. This species is distinguished from the larger, darker Forbes’s plover in that the latter species has a brown forehead and lacks a white wingbar.

References[edit]

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