Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species ranges through much of Italy, including the island of Sardinia and the easternmost parts of Sicily; it also is present on the island of Corsica (France), and the Balearic Islands of Spain (where it was probably introduced in prehistoric times). Found from sea level to 1,330 m asl in central Italy (Romano et al. 2003; Spilinga 2007).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is generally a lowland species. It occupies coastal areas (typically but not exclusively sand dunes), cultivated areas, and suburban and urban areas where it is found in gravel and sand pits, ponds and ditches; also in water tanks in the Balearic Islands.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2009

Assessor/s
Roberto Sindaco, Antonio Romano, Iñigo Martínez-Solano

Reviewer/s
Cox, N. and Temple, H.J. (Global Amphibian Assessment)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
Common with stable populations in suitable habitats in Italy. Within the Balearic Islands it is common except for on Ibiza. It is declining slowly on Majorca and more rapidly on Ibiza as a result of loss of breeding habitat.

Population Trend
Decreasing
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
In the Balearic Islands, loss and degradation of breeding habitat has resulted from excessive water abstraction, urbanization, decline of traditional agricultural practices and pollution with agrochemicals. Fragmentation as a result of road construction is also a problem.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species occurs in protected areas. There have been some reintroductions in Ibiza, and some habitat restoration (restoration of water tanks) has been carried out. It is listed on Appendix II of the Bern Convention and Annex IV of the Habitats Directive (as Bufo viridis).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Balearic green toad

The Balearic green toad (Bufo balearicus, Bufotes balearicus, or Pseudepidalea balearica) is a toad belonging to the true toad family Bufonidae. It is a low-land species but can be found as high as 1,300 m (4,300 ft) asl in central Italy.[1]

Distribution[edit]

Distribution

In spite of the name, this species is native to Italy (where it is present on all territories except for the extreme north-east and south-west) and Corsica.[1] It was probably introduced to the Balearic Islands in prehistoric times,[2] where it is common but declining.[1]

Taxonomy[edit]

Once considered the same as Bufo viridis, molecular genetic data now firmly support its status as a separate species.[3]

Specimen in San Vincenzo, Tuscany, calling

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Roberto Sindaco, Antonio Romano, Iñigo Martínez-Solano (2009). "Pseudepidalea balearica". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 16 March 2014. 
  2. ^ Hemmer, Helmut; Kadel, Beate; Kadel, Karl (1981). "The Balearic toad (Bufo viridis balearicus (BOETTGER, 1881)), human bronze age culture, and Mediterranean biogeography". Amphibia-Reptilia 2 (3): 217–230. doi:10.1163/156853881X00041. 
  3. ^ Stöck, M.; Sicilia, A.; Belfiore, N.; Buckley, D.; Lo Brutto, S.; Lo Valvo, M.; Arculeo, M. (2008). "Post-Messinian evolutionary relationships across the Sicilian channel: Mitochondrial and nuclear markers link a new green toad from Sicily to African relatives". BMC Evolutionary Biology 8: 56–74. doi:10.1186/1471-2148-8-56. PMC 2276203. PMID 18294389. 
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!