Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

A small, long, very slender, sharp-nosed savanna-living Hyperolius (19-24 mm). Dorsum translucent green, uniform or with diffuse darker spots. A light yellow dorsolateral and canthal stripe normally present in males, sometimes in females. Sometimes a fine middorsal line of chromatophores is present. Ventrum white; limbs, feet and discs green, or discs sometimes reddish. Pupil horizontal. The males are of the same size as the females which is unusual among Hyperolius. In some populations the females lack the light dorsolateral stripe, while it is present in others.

The tadpole attains a size of 33 mm (10+23) and has a tooth formula of 1/3.

This species is called Hyperolius acuticeps (Channing et al. 2002) or Hyperolius igbettensis in some recent literature. Due to nomenclatorial uncertainty, the well established name H. nasutus is used here (Schiøtz 2006).

Several subspecies have been described, but our understanding of the variation within this species is not sufficient to establish such subspecies. Furthermore the complex may contain several cryptic species. Thus in southern Africa, the very similar H. benguellensis has recently been recognized as a separate species.

Channing has stated that the South African populations differ, e.g. in voice, from more northern populations of H. nasustus and should be recognised as H. poweri Loveridge 1938.

There is a form in south-western Cameroun southwards at least as far as R. Congo, probably to Kinshasa in R. D. Congo, which is probably a distinct species. It is similar to H. nasutus but differs in morphology, having a briefer snout and a broader body, and has a somewhat different voice and habitat preference (bushland and humid savanna). This species is being studied by Amiet, and has been recorded as Hyperolius sp. aff. nasutus by Largen and Dowsett-Lemaire (1991) from R. Congo.

This account was taken from "Treefrogs of Africa" by Arne Schiøtz with kind permission from Edition Chimaira publishers, Frankfurt am Main.

  • Channing, A., Moyer, D., and Burger, M. (2002). ''Cryptic species of sharp-nosed reed frogs in the Hyperolius nasutus complex: advertisement call differences.'' African Zoology, 37(1), 91-99.
  • Largen, M. J. and Dowsett-Lemaire, F. (1991). ''Amphibians (Anura) from the Kouilou River Basin, République du Congo.'' Tauraco Research Report, 4, 145-168.
  • Schiøtz, A. (1999). Treefrogs of Africa. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt am Main.
  • Schiøtz, A. (2006). ''Reflections on the Hyperolius nasutus group.'' Alytes, 24(1-4), 61-71.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© AmphibiaWeb © 2000-2011 The Regents of the University of California

Source: AmphibiaWeb

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Etymology

The specific name is from the Latin 'nasutus' meaning long-nosed.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Zimkus, Breda

Source: African Amphibians Lifedesk

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Taxonomic Notes

Hyperolius nasutus is considered a ‘superspecies,’ a complex of multiple species that are morphologically similar, but vary in their advertisement calls and occur throughout much of sub-Saharan Africa. Included in debates over this complex are H. acuticeps, H. adspersus, H. benguellensis, H. lamottei, H. nasutus, H. poweri, H. quinquevittatus, and H. viridis. More work is necessary to determine the limits of species boundaries within this complex (Harper et al., 2010). See Channing et al. (2002), Schiøtz (2006), and Pickersgill (2007) for further discussion.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Zimkus, Breda

Source: African Amphibians Lifedesk

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

Range Description

This species ranges from northern Botswana, northern Namibia and western Zambia, north to northern Angola. It is presumed to occur in southwestern Democratic Republic of the Congo, but there do not appear to be any confirmed records. It might occur in northwestern Zimbabwe, but its distribution is very poorly known. Records from northwestern Zambia possibly belong to an undescribed species. It has recently been reported from Côte d'Ivoire (Rödel et al. 2006) and northern Benin (Nago et al. 2006).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution and Habitat

A common and widespread element in the savanna fauna, most noticeably in the more humid, dense savanna, from central West Africa (central Côte d’Ivoire) to East Africa and further south, and into the savanna of R. D. Congo and Angola. Due to confusion with H. benguellensis, H. poweri and H. sp., names which may or may not cover valid species and which may replace H. nasutus or may exist sympatric with it, an exact distribution cannot be given.

  • Channing, A., Moyer, D., and Burger, M. (2002). ''Cryptic species of sharp-nosed reed frogs in the Hyperolius nasutus complex: advertisement call differences.'' African Zoology, 37(1), 91-99.
  • Largen, M. J. and Dowsett-Lemaire, F. (1991). ''Amphibians (Anura) from the Kouilou River Basin, République du Congo.'' Tauraco Research Report, 4, 145-168.
  • Schiøtz, A. (1999). Treefrogs of Africa. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt am Main.
  • Schiøtz, A. (2006). ''Reflections on the Hyperolius nasutus group.'' Alytes, 24(1-4), 61-71.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© AmphibiaWeb © 2000-2011 The Regents of the University of California

Source: AmphibiaWeb

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

The following is the original description by Günther (1865):

Snout much produced, acutely pointed. with the canthus rostralis angular, and the loreal region flat; diameter of the eye more than half as long as the snout; tympanum hidden; tongue deeply notched;
limbs slender; fingers slightly, toes half webbed. Upper parts smooth; belly faintly granulated. Reddish white, with more or less numerous brown dots on the head and back.

Length of body: 11.5 lines
Length of hind limb: 17.5 lines
Distance between vent and heel: 11.5 lines
Length of fore limb: 8 lines

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Zimkus, Breda

Source: African Amphibians Lifedesk

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Size

Males and females are 19–26 mm in snout-vent length (Harper et al., 2010).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Zimkus, Breda

Source: African Amphibians Lifedesk

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

This is a small, slender, translucent green frog with a sharp snout. There is a pair of light dorsolateral stripes that begin at the snout and continue over the eyes to the base of the legs. The tympanum is small and may be difficult to see. The throat of males is yellow. The ventral surface is white. Webbing is variable, but there is a small amount of webbing on the fingers. The toes are not extensively webbed (Text from Harper et al., 2010).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Zimkus, Breda

Source: African Amphibians Lifedesk

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is associated with emergent vegetation and sedges at the margins of swamps, rivers and lakes in savannah and grassland habitats. It can be found around human settlements. It breeds in swamps, shallow pans, emergent vegetation, vleis, lakes, permanent and temporary pools and ponds. A prolonged breeder, it begins reproduction 2-5 months after the beginning of the rainy season. Females were found to lay an average of 150 and 199 eggs over two sampling periods (Rödel et al. 2006).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Habitat and Ecology

This species is found in a wide range of habitat types, including savanna, shrubland, grassland, and degraded habitats, such as, agricultural and urban area at elevations up to 900 m (Text from Harper et al., 2010).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Zimkus, Breda

Source: African Amphibians Lifedesk

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Reproduction

Advertisement Call

Call is variable within the complex (Harper et al., 2010).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Zimkus, Breda

Source: African Amphibians Lifedesk

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Breeding takes place in rivers, lakes and swamps with emergent vegetation. Eggs are laid directly in the water in clutches of around 200 eggs (Text from Harper et al., 2010).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Zimkus, Breda

Source: African Amphibians Lifedesk

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2009

Assessor/s
Schiøtz, A., Channing, A., Burger, M. & Largen, M.

Reviewer/s
Stuart, S., Chanson, J. & Cox, N. (Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

History
  • 2004
    Least Concern
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
It is a common species.

Population Trend
Stable
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

The call is a high-pitched scream consisting of an initial sound and a small number of elements.

The eggs are laid submerged in water in batches of about 200. They have a white and greenish-grey pole.

  • Channing, A., Moyer, D., and Burger, M. (2002). ''Cryptic species of sharp-nosed reed frogs in the Hyperolius nasutus complex: advertisement call differences.'' African Zoology, 37(1), 91-99.
  • Largen, M. J. and Dowsett-Lemaire, F. (1991). ''Amphibians (Anura) from the Kouilou River Basin, République du Congo.'' Tauraco Research Report, 4, 145-168.
  • Schiøtz, A. (1999). Treefrogs of Africa. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt am Main.
  • Schiøtz, A. (2006). ''Reflections on the Hyperolius nasutus group.'' Alytes, 24(1-4), 61-71.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© AmphibiaWeb © 2000-2011 The Regents of the University of California

Source: AmphibiaWeb

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
It occurs widely in an area of limited human impact, and is unlikely to be significantly threatened.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is known to occur in Comoé National Park, Côte d'Ivoire (Rödel et al. 2006) and in Pendjari National Park, Benin (Nago et al. 2006). It may also occur in other protected areas.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Hyperolius nasutus

Hyperolius nasutus is a species of frog in the Hyperoliidae family. Common names include long-nosed reed frog and sharp-nosed reed frog. It is found in Angola, Botswana, Republic of the Congo, Gabon, Namibia, Zambia, possibly Democratic Republic of the Congo, and possibly Zimbabwe.

Its natural habitats are dry savanna, moist savanna, subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, subtropical or tropical moist shrubland, subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland, subtropical or tropical seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland, subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland, rivers, swamps, freshwater lakes, freshwater marshes, urban areas, heavily degraded former forest, water storage areas, and ponds.

References [edit]

  • Schiøtz, A., et al. 2009. Hyperolius nasutus. In: IUCN 2012. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.2. Downloaded on 02 June 2013.
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!