Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is known historically from northern Myanmar and China (Zhao and Adler, 1993). It is also known from northern Viet Nam and central Lao People's Democratic Republic. The type locality 'Singapore' is clearly based on a traded specimen (Bourret, 1941). It is known from altitudes up to 900m asl.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It inhabits forests and riparian forests in hilly areas. It breeds in still waters such as paddy fields, pools, ditches, marshes and ponds. It is mostly restricted to primary forest. The call of this species is exceptionally loud.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Rhacophorus dennysi

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Rhacophorus dennysi

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 5
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Peter Paul van Dijk, Nguyen Quang Truong, Bryan Stuart, Michael Wai Neng Lau, Geng Baorong, Gu Huiqing, Yang Datong

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a degree of habitat modification, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.
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Population

Population
It is a rarely encountered species that is uncommon when encountered.

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Threats

Major Threats
Its known areas of occurrence in Viet Nam continue to suffer from persistent processes degrading the forest, such as non-timber forest products collection, plantations, wildfires and changes to hydrology (BirdLife International 2001). Small numbers are also exported for the international pet trade.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Its range includes many protected areas. The rating of ‘Threatened’ for R. nigropalmatus in the 1992 Viet Nam Red Data Book (Tran et al., 1992) might refer in part to R. dennysii.
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Wikipedia

Chinese flying frog

Adult exhibited at Museum of Discovery and Science (Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA)

The Chinese flying frog or Chinese gliding frog (Rhacophorus dennysi) is a species of tree frog in the Rhacophoridae family found in China, Laos, Burma, and Vietnam. Also known as the Blanford's whipping frog, large treefrog, and Denny's whipping frog.[2]

This frog is up to 10 cm (3.9 in) long. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, rivers, swamps, freshwater marshes, intermittent freshwater marshes, ponds, irrigated land, and canals, and ditches.

Females lay eggs in foam nests attached to branches and grasses hanging over water. They create nests by beating a frothy secretion into foam with their hind legs.

It is not considered violated by the IUCN.

References[edit]

  1. ^ van Dijk, P.P., Truong, N.Q., Stuart, B., Lau, M.W.N., Baorong, G., Huiqing, G. & Datong, Y. (2004). Rhacophorus dennysi. 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Downloaded on 23 July 2007.
  2. ^ Rhacophorus dennysi, Amphibian Species of the World 5.6
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