Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs in northern Australia from the Kimberley region in Western Australia, east through the Northern Territory and northern Queensland in Eurimbulah National Park. It also occurs in the southern lowlands of central New Guinea (both Indonesia and Papua New Guinea), below 50m asl. In Australia, its range occurs within a region that is very flat so the species is known only from low elevations.
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Distribution and Habitat

Northern Australia. From the Kimberley region in Western Australia, east through the Northern Territory and northern Queensland in Eurimbulah National Park.The extent of occurrence of the species is approximately 586000 km2.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Margules, C.R., Davies, K.F., Meyers, J.A., and Milkovits, G.A. (1995). ''The responses of some selected arthropods and the frog Crinia signifera to habitat fragmentation.'' Conserving Biodiversity: Threats and Solutions. Surrey Beatty and Sons, Sydney, 94-103.
  • Davies, M. and Watson, G.F. (1994). ''Morphology and reproductive biology of Limnodynastes salmini, L. convexiusculus and Megistolotis lignarius (Anura: Leptodactylidae: Limnodynastinae).'' Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia, 118(3), 149â€"169.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species inhabits tropical savannahs, and is usually found in swampy areas among long grass, and low-lying areas exposed to seasonal flooding. It breeds between October and March. Males call from concealed positions at the base of grass tussocks, in debris or in vacated burrows of freshwater crabs. The eggs are deposited in a floating foam nest in temporary pools and ditches. It survives well in disturbed areas and towns.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Limnodynastes convexiusculus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 18
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Jean-Marc Hero, Dale Roberts, Paul Horner, Richard Retallick, Fred Parker, Djoko Iskandar

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.
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Population

Population
It is a very common species in New Guinea, and is considered common in Australia.

Population Trend
Stable
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Usually in swampy areas among long grass. Low-lying areas exposed to seasonal flooding.Breeds between October and March. Males call from concealed positions at the base of grass tussocks, in debris or in vacated burrows of freshwater crabs. Eggs are deposited in a floating foam nest in temporary pools.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Margules, C.R., Davies, K.F., Meyers, J.A., and Milkovits, G.A. (1995). ''The responses of some selected arthropods and the frog Crinia signifera to habitat fragmentation.'' Conserving Biodiversity: Threats and Solutions. Surrey Beatty and Sons, Sydney, 94-103.
  • Davies, M. and Watson, G.F. (1994). ''Morphology and reproductive biology of Limnodynastes salmini, L. convexiusculus and Megistolotis lignarius (Anura: Leptodactylidae: Limnodynastinae).'' Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia, 118(3), 149â€"169.
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no known threats to this species.
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

No known declines and large extent of occurrence (>20,000km2).

Threats
None known.

Conservation Measures
Protected where it occurs in National Parks as in Queensland.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Margules, C.R., Davies, K.F., Meyers, J.A., and Milkovits, G.A. (1995). ''The responses of some selected arthropods and the frog Crinia signifera to habitat fragmentation.'' Conserving Biodiversity: Threats and Solutions. Surrey Beatty and Sons, Sydney, 94-103.
  • Davies, M. and Watson, G.F. (1994). ''Morphology and reproductive biology of Limnodynastes salmini, L. convexiusculus and Megistolotis lignarius (Anura: Leptodactylidae: Limnodynastinae).'' Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia, 118(3), 149â€"169.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Protected where it occurs in National Parks as in Queensland. The extent of occurrence needs to be documented further in New Guinea. It is not known from any protected areas in New Guinea but occurs in several in Australia.
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Wikipedia

Marbled frog

For other uses, see Marbled frog (disambiguation).

The marbled frog or spotted marshfrog (Limnodynastes convexiusculus) is a species of ground-dwelling frog native to northern and north-eastern Australia, and southern New Guinea.

It is not to be confused with the spotted grass frog (Limnodynastes tasmaniensis), which was also formerly known as the "marbled frog" in South Australia.[1]

Physical description[edit]

Adult Marbled Frogs reach about 4.5 centimetres (1.8 in) in length, sometimes larger. Toes are long and unwebbed. Grey to light brown on back with numerous prominent darker blotches. The belly is white. Males have a yellowish throat and numerous small sharp black spines on their backs. When disturbed their skin excretes large amounts of mucous.

Ecology and behaviour[edit]

The Marbled Frog tends to be solitary inhabiting thick ground vegetation and is more often heard than seen. Males often call from hidden sites, usually partly submerged beneath vegetation. Its call has been described as "a rapid series of uk uk uks". Eggs are laid in a floating foam nest under vegetation and are small and brown. Tadpoles reach 7 centimetres (2.8 in) in length.

The Marbled Frog inhabits waterholes and pools in open grassland and woodland.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Waite, Edgar R. (1929): The reptiles and amphibians of South Australia. Facsimile Edition, issued to commemorate the Second World Congress of Herpetology, Adelaide,South Australia, by the Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles. 1993.

References[edit]

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