Overview

Distribution

L. peronii is found on the coast and ranges of Victoria, North South Wales, and eastern Queensland on the continent of Australia.

Biogeographic Regions: australian (Native )

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Range Description

This Australian endemic is found along the east coast of Australia, from far-north Queensland along the coast through New South Wales and into Victoria and the southeast corner of South Australia. It is also known from King Island and from the northwest and a few populations in the far northeast of Tasmania.
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Distribution and Habitat

Found along the east coast of Australia. From far-north Queensland along the coast through New South Wales and into Victoria and the south-east corner of South Australia.

The area of occurrence of the species is approximately 664300 km2.

Species is widespread and abundant and there is anecdotal evidence to suggest that the species may be increasing in numbers and extending its range in Queensland. It is often referred to as a weed species in Queensland.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Hero, J.-M., Littlejohn, M., and Marantelli, G. (1991). Frogwatch Field Guide to Victorian Frogs. Department of Conservation and Environment, Victoria.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Male L. peronii are approximately 65 mm in length, with females being slightly smaller. The dorsal surface of males and females is marked with a series of dark and light brown stripes, and there is frequently a pale mid dorsal stripe. The striped dorsal pattern breaks up laterally into a series of blotches. The ventral surface is white, except for the throat of the male, which is distinguished by a yellow wash and dark brown mottling. The snout is rather pointed and the iris is golden above and dark brown below. The toes are very long and not webbed, with a small inner metatarsal tubercle. The fingers are without webbing although breeding females have prominent flanges. The forearms show sexual dimorphism and they are bigger in males than females.

Limnodynastes peronii could be confused with L. salmini or L. tasmaniensis. The latter is much smaller (45 mm) and although the body shape is essentially the same, the dorsal pattern is spotted, not striped. L. salmini can be distinguished by the presence of pink-orange dorsal and lateral stripes.

Average length: 65 mm.

Sexual Dimorphism: male larger; sexes colored or patterned differently

Other Physical Features: ectothermic ; bilateral symmetry

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Ecology

Habitat

L. peronii is widespread and adaptable. L. peronii is usually found associated with permanent water throughout its range, in slow moving streams, swamps, marshes, damns, and ponds. It is especially common under debris on river flats. In suburban areas L. peronii commonly uses outdoor fish ponds as breeding sites. The striped marsh frog also appears tolerant of polluted water.

Aquatic Biomes: lakes and ponds

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Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The species can be found in many habitats including rainforests, wet and dry forests, woodlands, and shrublands, open and disturbed areas. They also frequent swamps, flooded grassland, suburban pools and ponds. Secretive by day, hiding under logs, stones or underneath flood debris and from crayfish burrows. It is a robust species that is able to persist and/or re-colonise heavily disturbed habitat. Breeding occurs from August to April and potentially any month of the year. Males call by day hidden in thick vegetation, forest debris or overhanging ledges. At night they call from the water floating in concealed sites. Females lay 700-1000 eggs in a foam nest tangled in vegetation (reeds and rushes) at the water’s edge.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Trophic Strategy

Juvenile L. peronii are herbivores that feed on aquatic flora. However, once the striped marsh frog matures, its food habits change. Mature L. peronii are carnivores that tend to feed on insects and other small invertebrates.

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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Development - Life Cycle: metamorphosis

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Reproduction

Breeding occurs form August until March. The female deposits 700 to 1,000 small, unpigmented eggs in a foam mass entangled in vegetation at the edge of a slow moving river or pond. An exception occurs in southern Australia. In the lower southeast of South Australia females lack finger flanges and do not produce a foam nest. The tadpoles reach 65 mm in length and are pale brown with the adult dorsal pattern becoming apparent as the tadpole is developing forelimbs.

Breeding season: Breeding occurs from August to March.

Range number of offspring: 700 to 1,000.

Key Reproductive Features: gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); oviparous

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Conservation

Conservation Status

This is one of the most common frogs of eastern Australia. There are currently no problems with population numbers and no IUCN warning listings. However, if deforestation and destruction of aquatic habitat occur, L. peronii could face a drastic reduction in population numbers.

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: least concern

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IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Jean-Marc Hero, Peter Robertson, Frank Lemckert, John Clarke, Ed Meyer

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

History
  • 2002
    Least Concern
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Population

Population
The species is widespread and abundant and there is anecdotal evidence to suggest that the species might be increasing in numbers and extending its range in Queensland. It is often referred to as a weed species in Queensland and New South Wales. It is apparently rare in Tasmania, and it is estimated that there are less than 5,000 adults.

Population Trend
Increasing
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Can be found in many habitats including: rainforests, wet and dry forests, woodlands, shrublands, open and disturbed areas. They also frequent swamps, flooded grassland, suburban pools and ponds. Secretive by day, hiding under logs, stones or leaf litter and it can burrow.

Breeding occurs from August to March. Males call by day hidden in thick vegetation, forest debris or overhanging ledges. At night they call from the water floating in concealed sites. Females lay 700 - 1000 eggs in a foam nest tangled in vegetation (reeds and rushes) at the water's edge.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Hero, J.-M., Littlejohn, M., and Marantelli, G. (1991). Frogwatch Field Guide to Victorian Frogs. Department of Conservation and Environment, Victoria.
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no known major threats to this widespread and adaptable species. In Tasmania, drainage of habitat for agricultural purposes is a threat.
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Not known.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Hero, J.-M., Littlejohn, M., and Marantelli, G. (1991). Frogwatch Field Guide to Victorian Frogs. Department of Conservation and Environment, Victoria.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The range of the species includes several protected areas. It is listed as "Rare" on the Tasmanian Threatened Species Protection Act 1995.
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

These frogs currently have no commercial economic value for humans. However, the Brown Striped Marsh Frog helps humans by feeding on insects.

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Wikipedia

Striped marsh frog

The striped marsh frog or brown-striped frog (Limnodynastes peronii) is a predominantly aquatic frog native to coastal eastern Australia. It is a common species in urban habitats.

Taxonomy[edit]

The striped marsh frog was described by French naturalists André Marie Constant Duméril and Gabriel Bibron in 1841.

Description[edit]

Females may reach a length of 75 millimetres (3.0 in) and males 70 millimetres (2.8 in).[1] They are a shade of brown on the dorsal surface. This colour can be light or dark; they can also be a red-brown on the dorsal surface. There are distinct darker stripes running down the frogs back (giving this species it name), there is normally a paler mid-dorsal stripe running down the back. There is a black "mask" that runs from the nostril, through the eye and down to the shoulder. This "mask" is followed by a thick light golden line that runs underneath the "mask" and terminates at the end of the mouth. Breeding males develop thick arms, these are used in "wrestling" matches with other frogs, the throat of males is yellow in colour. The belly is white.

Ecology and behaviour[edit]

Striped Marsh Frog with spawn

This species is the most frequently encountered frog on the east coast. They are normally the first frog to colonise a garden frog pond and are often victims of backyard swimming pools. They will inhabit ponds, roadside ditches, creeks, dams, flooded areas and any other available water body. They are tolerant of polluted water. Males call while floating in water from a hidden area in vegetation. They make a "tok" or "whuck" call,[2] similar to a hen clucking, during all months of the year (particularly spring-autumn). This call is familiar to anyone in Sydney who has a garden pond.

The breeding season is from late Winter to early Spring.[2] Eggs are laid in a foamy nest and tadpoles can take 8–12 months to develop. Pale brown, they can be up to 6.5 cm long.[2]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

It is distributed from the southern parts of the Cape York Peninsula in North Queensland, through all of coastal New South Wales, Southern Victoria to southeastern South Australia and Northern Tasmania.[2] Although this species is very common in coastal NSW, it is not common in Tasmania and listed as rare.

As a pet[edit]

It is kept as a pet,[3] in Australia this animal may be kept in captivity with the appropriate permit.

Sources[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wildlife of Greater Brisbane. Brisbane: Queensland Museum. 2007. p. 222. ISBN 978-0-9775943-1-3. 
  2. ^ a b c d Tyler, Michael (2011). Field Guide to the Frogs of Australia: Revised Edition. Csiro Publishing. p. 86. ISBN 0643103988. 
  3. ^ Mark Davidson. 2005. Australian Reptile Keeper Publications. ISBN 0-9758200-0-1
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