Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species ranges from western Ethiopia, South Sudan and northeastern Democratic Republic of Congo, through Uganda, Kenya and southern Somalia, south to central Mozambique and Zimbabwe. There is an apparently isolated population in KwaZulu-Natal, eastern South Africa, and in extreme southern Mozambique. It might occur in northern Botswana and the Caprivi Strip of Namibia (the species' distribution on the map overlaps into these areas), but the respective distributions of this species and Hyperolius nasutus are not well known. It is likely to range further west through the Central African Republic and southern Chad, but there are no records from these countries, and the respective distributions of this species and Hyperolius igbettensis (known from Cameroon westwards) are very poorly known. It occurs from sea level up to 2,000 m asl in Ethiopia, and 2,286 m asl in Malawi.
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H. acuticeps occurs in the Ivory Coast, Ethiopia, Somalia, extending southward to South Africa (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is associated with emergent vegetation at the margins of swamps, rivers and lakes in savannah and grassland habitats. It can be found around human settlements, but apparently does not respond well to extreme urbanization and agricultural intensification. It breeds in swamps, shallow plans, emergent vegetation, vleis, lakes and permanent pools.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Habitat and Ecology

This species inhabits the Savanna and Grassland biomes (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

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Associations

Predators include various birds, snakes, terrapins, spiders and other frogs, while prey consists mainly of flying insects (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Metamorphosis

Within five days of being hatched tadpoles leave the egg capsule (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

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Reproduction

Advertisement Call

Males call from elevated positions, near the tops of sedges and reeds, and frequently engage in territorial disputes (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

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H. acuticeps breeding takes place in the wet season, in shallow coastal pans, vleis and inundated grassland with dense, emergent and or littoral vegetation (Poynton 1964; Lambiris 1989; Passmore and Carruthers 1995; pers.obs.). Females deposit 60–292 eggs, in groups of 2–20, on submerged leaves or roots (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Hyperolius acuticeps

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group

Reviewer/s
Stuart, S.N.

Contributor/s
Channing, A., Schiøtz, A., Howell, K., Largen, M.J. & Lötters, S.

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a broad range of habitats and its presumed large population.

History
  • 2004
    Least Concern
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IUCN Red List Category and Justification of Conservation Status

H. acuticeps is considered Least Concern. A major threat to this species is habitat loss through the drainage of wetlands for agricultural and urban development (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

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Population

Population
It is a common species through most its range, though it has decreased in South Africa, and is now rare outside protected areas in that country.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
In South Africa it is threatened by afforestation, coastal development, wetland drainage, and lowering of water table due to the spread eucalyptus. The Ethiopian populations are almost certainly being affected by environmental degradation as a result of expanding human settlement. However, overall, this species remains abundant and is not seriously at risk.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It occurs in many protected areas.
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Wikipedia

Hyperolius acuticeps

Hyperolius acuticeps is a species of frogs found in Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, and possibly Botswana, the Central African Republic, Chad, Namibia, and Swaziland. Its natural habitats are dry savanna, moist savanna, temperate shrubland, subtropical or tropical moist shrubland, temperate grasslands, subtropical or tropical dry lowland grasslands, subtropical or tropical seasonally wet or flooded lowland grasslands, subtropical or tropical high-altitude grasslands, rivers, swamps, freshwater lakes, freshwater marshes, urban areas, heavily degraded former forests, water storage areas, and ponds. It is threatened by habitat loss.

References[edit]

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