Overview

Distribution

Range

Swamps and marshes of sw and se Australia and Tasmania.

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
  • Marine
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© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Anas castanea

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has a very large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size is very large, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
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Source: IUCN

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Population

Population Trend
Stable
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Source: IUCN

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Wikipedia

Chestnut Teal

The chestnut teal (Anas castanea) is a dabbling duck found in southern Australia. It is protected under the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974.

Description[edit]

The chestnut teal is darker and a slightly bigger bird than the grey teal.[2]

The male has a distinctive green coloured head and mottled brown body. The female has a brown head and mottled brown body. The female is almost identical in appearance to the grey teal.

The female chestnut teal has a loud penetrating "laughing" quack repeated rapidly nine times or more.[2]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

female and 6 ducklings including 2 albino, Tasmania

The chestnut teal is commonly distributed in south-eastern and south-western Australia, while vagrants may occur elsewhere. Tasmania and southern Victoria are the species’ stronghold,[2] while vagrants can be found as far north as New Guinea and Lord Howe Island.[3]

The chestnut teal prefers coastal estuaries and wetlands, and is indifferent to salinity. This bird is an omnivore.

Breeding[edit]

Chestnut teals form monogamous pairs that stay together outside the breeding season, defend the nest site and look after the young when hatched. Nests are usually located over water, in a down-lined tree hollow about 6–10 m high. Sometimes nests are placed on the ground, among clumps of grass near water. The young hatch and are ready to swim and walk within a day.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Anas castanea". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c "Chestnut Teal". Recreation and Tourism. Department of Sustainability and Environment. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  3. ^ a b "Chestnut Teal". Birds in Backyards. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 


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