Overview

Brief Summary

Biology

Very little is known about Hyperolius discodactylus or indeed about most of the species within the genus. In the wet season the reed frogs tend to gather near water, preferably smaller temporary water bodies, where they breed. However, very little is known of their whereabouts outside the breeding season (6). Most, if not all, Hyperolius species from forest habitats deposit eggs in a gelatinous mass on vegetation above water, while some savanna-living species lay their eggs aquatically (5) (6).
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Description

Hyperolius discodactylus is one of at least nine Hyperolius species endemic to the Albertine Rift, one of the richest sites for biodiversity in Africa (1) (3). In common with many species within this genus, it has moderately long-limbs and large toe pads that aid its largely arboreal lifestyle (4) (5). The smooth back of this species varies in colour between brown and orange and is sometimes dotted with diffuse dark spots. Underneath it is bright orange except for the male vocal sac which is bright green (2). The call of male Hyperolius discodactylus is a fairly long buzzing (2).
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Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs in western Rwanda, south-western Uganda, western Burundi and eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (west of Lake Edward and in Mount Ruwenzori). It is a montane species, but its exact altitudinal range is around 1,600 to 2,700 m asl. Its range, taken as a proxy for extent of occurrence (EOO), is estimated to be 12,383 km2.
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Distribution and Habitat

Found in high-elevation montane forest along streams in western Rwanda, western Burundi, southwestern Uganda, and eastern D. R. Congo (Channing and Howell 2006).

  • Channing, A., and Howell, K. M. (2006). Amphibians of East Africa. Cornell University Press, Ithaca.
  • Frost, D. R. (2007). Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 5.1 (10 October 2007). Electronic Database accessible at http://research.amnh.org/herpetology/amphibia/index.php. American Museum of Natural History, New York, USA.
  • Schiøtz, A. (1999). Treefrogs of Africa. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt am Main.
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Range

Found in the Albertine Rift, encompassing parts of eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, western Rwanda, western Burundi, and south-western Uganda (1).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is a species of montane forests, associated with rivers, streams and swamps where it presumably breeds. Its adaptability to secondary habitats is not known. Its habitat is declining outside protected areas where this species has not been recorded.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Hyperolius discodactylus occurs along streams in montane forests (6).
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group

Reviewer/s
Luedtke, J.

Contributor/s
Plumptre, A., Schiøtz, A., Liedtke , C., Dehling, M., Menegon, M., Drewes, R. & Loader, S.

Justification
Listed as Least Concern because even though its population is considered to be severely fragmented and it has an estimated extent of occurrence (EOO) of 12,383 km2, it is known from protected areas where populations are not considered to be in decline.

History
  • 2004
    Vulnerable
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Status

Classified as Vulnerable (VU) on the IUCN Red List (1).
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Population

Population
It can be common within a site, but in general is rarely encountered. As it is a high altitude species, its population is thought to be severely fragmented across its range, as no one fragment has more than 50% of the population and subpopulations are thought to be too far apart for dispersal.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
Little information is available, though it may be impacted by the loss of habitat for agriculture (crops and livestock), wood extraction and human settlements outside of protected areas.
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In common with other reed frogs endemic to the Albertine Rift, the distribution of Hyperolius discodactylus is severely fragmented and its population is probably declining because of a decrease in the quality and extent of its habitat. Wood extraction, habitat conversion for agriculture and encroaching human settlement are thought to be principally responsible for habitat degradation in the Albertine Rift (1).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It is present in the Bwindi National Park (Uganda), Ruwenzori Mountains National Park (Uganda), Nyungwe National Park (Rwanda), Bururi Nature Reserve (Burundi) and Kahuzi-Biega National Park and Virungas National Park (Democratic Republic of Congo). Conservation of habitat outside protected areas is required. More information is needed on this species' occurrence outside of protected areas, as well as on its taxonomy.
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Conservation

There are no known conservation measures for Hyperolius discodactylus, but it is known to be present in at least three protected areas, Bwindi National Park and Ruwenzori Mountains National Park in Uganda, and Virungas National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo (1).
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Wikipedia

Hyperolius discodactylus

Hyperolius discodactylus is a species of frog in the Hyperoliidae family. It is found in Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, and Uganda. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests and rivers. It is threatened by habitat loss.

References

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