Overview

Distribution

Historic Range:
Namibia, Angola

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Source: IUCN

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
VU
Vulnerable

Red List Criteria
D1

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
IUCN SSC Antelope Specialist Group

Reviewer/s
Mallon, D.P. (Antelope Red List Authority) & Hoffmann, M. (Global Mammal Assessment)

Contributor/s

Justification
The assessment as Vulnerable is based on the latest estimate of the surviving population within its natural range (<1,000 mature individuals). Criterion D2 (five or fewer locations) may also be applicable, but detailed distribution data are currently unavailable. If animals introduced elsewhere in Namibia are included, a listing of Near Threatened would be merited.

History
  • 1996
    Vulnerable
  • 1994
    Endangered
    (Groombridge 1994)
  • 1990
    Endangered
    (IUCN 1990)
  • 1988
    Endangered
    (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1988)
  • 1986
    Endangered
    (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1986)
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Source: IUCN

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Current Listing Status Summary

Status: Endangered
Date Listed: 06/02/1970
Lead Region: Foreign (Region 10) 
Where Listed: Namibia,Angola


Population detail:

Population location: Namibia,Angola
Listing status: E

For most current information and documents related to the conservation status and management of Aepyceros melampus petersi , see its USFWS Species Profile

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Population

Population Trend
Stable
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Source: IUCN

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Wikipedia

Black-faced Impala

The Black-faced Impala (Aepyceros melampus petersi) is a subspecies of the impala native to Angola and Namibia. It is not hard to tell it apart from the common impala, being significantly larger and having a black facial marking. It is also found in different locations than the common impala. While the species as a whole is not endangered, this subspecies has come close to extinction. In 1968–1971, 310 individuals were transferred to Etosha National Park for better protection, and their number is steadily increasing. However, the current population is still less than 1000 and possible interbreeding with the common impala from nearby farms may be damaging to the gene pool. [2]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ IUCN SSC Antelope Specialist Group (2008). Aepyceros melampus ssp. melampus. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 5 February 2009.
  2. ^ Eline Deirdre Lorenzen, Institute of Biology, University of Copenhagen, 2007 ARKive
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