The following bibliography has been generated by bringing together all references provided by our content partners. There may be duplication.

References

  • Abrahamovich, A. H., Diaz N. B., & Lucia M.   (2005).  Las Especies del Género Bombus Latreille en Argentina (Hymenoptera: Apidae). Estudio Taxonómico y Claves Para su Identificación.  Neotropical Entomology. 34(2), 235-250.
  • Bumble Bee Biology and Management (International Pollination Systems)
  • Bumble Bee Biology and Management (International Pollination Systems)
  • Bumble Bees in Decline, The Xerces Society
  • Bumblebee Foraging Preferences: Differences Between Species and Individuals (Laura Brodie, University of Aberdeen, www.bumblebee.org)
  • Bumblebee Foraging Preferences: Differences Between Species and Individuals (Laura Brodie, University of Aberdeen, www.bumblebee.org)
  • Bumblebee Foraging Preferences: Differences Between Species and Individuals, Laura Brodie, University of Aberdeen, www.bumblebee.org
  • Cameron, S. A., Lozier J. D., Strange J. P., Koch J. B., Cordes N., Solter L. F., et al. (2011). Patterns of widespread decline in North American bumble bees. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (U.S.A.). 108, 662-667.
  • Distribution Map for the United States & Canada, Natural History Museum, London, UK, accessed March, 2009.
  • Hilty, J. Editor. 2014. Insect Visitors of Illinois Wildflowers.  World Wide Web electronic publication. illinoiswildflowers.info, version (07/2014) 
    See:   Abbreviations for Insect ActivitiesAbbreviations for Scientific ObserversReferences for behavioral observations
  • Honey Bees, Bumble Bees, Carpenter Bees, and Sweat Bees (R. Wright, P. Mulder, and H. Reed, Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service)
  • Honey Bees, Bumble Bees, Carpenter Bees, and Sweat Bees (R. Wright, P. Mulder, and H. Reed, Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service)
  • Importation of Non-Native Bumble Bees into North America: Potential Consequences of Using Bombus terrestris and Other Non-Native Bumble Bees for Greenhouse Crop Pollination in Canada, Mexico, and the United States (K. Winter, L. Adams, R. Thorp, D. Inouye, L. Day, J. Ascher, and S. Buchmann, North American Pollinator Protection Campaign, August 2006)
  • Importation of Non-Native Bumble Bees into North America: Potential Consequences of Using Bombus terrestris and Other Non-Native Bumble Bees for Greenhouse Crop Pollination in Canada, Mexico, and the United States (K. Winter, L. Adams, R. Thorp, D. Inouye, L. Day, J. Ascher, and S. Buchmann, North American Pollinator Protection Campaign, August 2006)
  • It pays to know (and protect) your pollinators, Laura Sayre, The New Farm, Native Bombus Species
  • Michener, Charles D. 2000. The Bees of the World. xiv + 913
  • Other Pollinating Bees and Ways to Increase Their Numbers, University of Georgia Honey Bee Program
  • Pollination, North Carolina Integrated Pest Management Information
  • Pollination: The Forgotten Agricultural Input, M. T. Sanford, Proceedings of the Florida Agricultural Conference and Trade Show, Lakeland, FL, September 29-30, 1998, J. Ferguson, et al eds., pp. 45-47)
  • Stinging Insects: Bumble Bees (K. Gardner, C. Klass, and N. Calderone, Cornell University Master Beekeeper Program)
  • Stinging Insects: Bumble Bees (K. Gardner, C. Klass, and N. Calderone, Cornell University Master Beekeeper Program)
  • Williams, P. H. 1998. An annotated checklist of bumble bees with an analysis of patterns of description (Hymenoptera: Apidae, Bombini). Bulletin of the Natural History Museum (Entomology), vol. 67, no. 1. 79-152

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