You are viewing this Species as classified by:

Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs in Uruguay, southeastern Brazil, southeastern Paraguay and central and northern Argentina (Gardner 2007). The populations from the Atlantic Forest assigned traditionally to M. sorex, are now considered as conspecific with M. dimidiata (Vilela et al. 2010, Solari 2010).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is found in pastures, wetlands, pampas grasslands, and riparian areas next to waterways. Founded also in Atlantic coast rainforest (Eisenberg and Redford 1999, Emmons and Feer 1997).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2011

Assessor/s
Brito, D., Vilela, J., Flores, D. & Teta, P.

Reviewer/s
Solari, S. & Chiozza, F.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is listed as Least Concern in because of its wide distribution, occurrence in a number of protected areas, tolerance to some degree of habitat modification, and because it is unlikely to be declining at the rate required to qualify for listing in a threatened category. This species is in decline and further investigations into rates of decline and adaptability to disturbed habitat could indicate that this species is or will be Near Threatened, however, inference from current knowledge suggests Least Concern is more appropriate at this time.

History
  • 2008
    Least Concern
    (IUCN 2008)
  • 2008
    Least Concern
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
This species can be common in the appropriate habitats (see Pine et al. 1985). Remaining populations of this species have been reduced to isolated fragments of their former range. In southeastern Brazil, northeastern Argentina and southern Paraguay, the population may be larger than thought as surveys have been inadequate.

Population Trend
Stable
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
No major threats occur to the species, although numerous populations are threatened by habitat conversion to agriculture or urbanized areas.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
M. dimidiata occurs in a number of protected areas in Brazil.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Yellow-sided opossum

The Yellow-sided Opossum, Monodelphis dimidiata, is an opossum species from South America. It is found in Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay. They have grey or black fur on their dorsal side with yellowish fur on the lateral side that continues down to the feet. They are the most mysterious of all the Monodelphis that is found specifically in the Pampean region or Pampa of Argentina. It is suspected to be a once in a life time breeder as seen in a three year observational study of one population in the marshy grasslands of the Pampean region. It is important to note the importance of maintaining their native grasslands in order for them to keep a stable population. [3]

Behavior[edit]

Marsupials are not typically predatory, other than the ‘‘didelphids’’ and ‘‘dasyurids’’, and this one species of Monodelphis. There is sexual dimorphism between the males and females in that the males are typically 100-150 g and the females are 30-70 g. Both males and females hunt. For dealing with various kinds of prey they crush the heads of arthropods and biting the neck of smaller mice. As seen in captivity, they will get a grab the neck of mice in a way that it can not move and then proceed to attack the head until it is dead. ‘’M. dimidiata’’ is thought to be analogous of the sabertooth predators seen in fossil records. Like the sabertooth, it has one of the largest canines of any marsupial relative to body size. It may serve as a living model to test hypotheses about hunting strategies of the extinct predators. [4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gardner, A. L. (2005). "Order Didelphimorphia". In Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M. Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 14. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494. 
  2. ^ Brito, D., Vilela, J., Flores, D. & Teta, P. (2011). "Monodelphis dimidiata". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2011.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 18 January 2012.  Database entry includes justification for why this species is of least concern
  3. ^ Baladrón, Alejandro V. Population Dynamics of the Southern Short-tailed Opossum (Monodelphis Dimidiata) in the Pampas of Argentina. CSIRO PUBLISHING. Australian Journal of Zoology, Web. 01 Dec. 2013.
  4. ^ Blanco, R. E., Jones, W. W., & Milne, N. N. (2013). Is the extant southern short-tailed opossum a pigmy sabretooth predator?. Journal Of Zoology, 291(2), 100-110.
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!