Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This Australian endemic occurs along the coast from mid-eastern New South Wales to eastern Victoria. It has been recorded between 100-800m asl. The extent of occurrence of the species is approximately 60,000km2.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution and Habitat

Along the coast of New South Wales and Victoria. From mid-eastern New South Wales to eastern Victoria.The extent of occurrence of the species is approximately 68000 km2

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Hero, J.-M., Littlejohn, M., and Marantelli, G. (1991). Frogwatch Field Guide to Victorian Frogs. Department of Conservation and Environment, Victoria.
  • Gillespie, G.R. and Hines, H.B. (1999). ''Status of temperate riverine frogs in south-eastern Australia.'' Declines and Disappearances of Australian Frogs. A. Campbell, eds., Environment Australia, Canberra, 109-130.
  • Anstis, M. and Littlejohn, M.J. (1996). ''The breeding biology of Litoria subglandulosa and L. citropa (Anura: Hylidae), and a re-evaluation of their geographic distribution.'' Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia, 120, 83-99.
  • Tyler, M.J. and Anstis, M. (1975). ''Taxonomy and biology of frogs of the Litoria citropa complex (Anura: Hylidae).'' Records of the South Australian Museum , 17(5), 41-50.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© AmphibiaWeb © 2000-2011 The Regents of the University of California

Source: AmphibiaWeb

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species occurs in wet or dry forest, temperate rainforest and woodland. Its preferred habitat is rocky flowing streams in heavily forested areas. It often hides under rocks along streams. It is restricted to streams with intact riparian vegetation. Breeding occurs in spring (September and October). Males call from a variety of positions, including from rocks and low vegetation within a few metres of shallow slow-flowing water. About 650-900 eggs are laid and sink to the bottom where they adhere to rocks in pools and backwaters of streams.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Jean-Marc Hero, Frank Lemckert, Peter Robertson

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

History
  • 2002
    Least Concern
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
This species is rarely seen.

Population Trend
Stable
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Rarely seen. Wet or dry forest, temperate rainforest and woodland. Preferred habitat is rocky flowing streams in heavily forested areas. Often hides under rocks along streams. Restricted to streams with intact riparian vegetation.Breeding occurs in spring (September and October). Males call from a variety of positions, including from rocks and low vegetation within a few metres of shallow slow-flowing water. About 650-900 eggs are laid and sink to the bottom where they adhere to rocks in pools and backwaters of streams.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Hero, J.-M., Littlejohn, M., and Marantelli, G. (1991). Frogwatch Field Guide to Victorian Frogs. Department of Conservation and Environment, Victoria.
  • Gillespie, G.R. and Hines, H.B. (1999). ''Status of temperate riverine frogs in south-eastern Australia.'' Declines and Disappearances of Australian Frogs. A. Campbell, eds., Environment Australia, Canberra, 109-130.
  • Anstis, M. and Littlejohn, M.J. (1996). ''The breeding biology of Litoria subglandulosa and L. citropa (Anura: Hylidae), and a re-evaluation of their geographic distribution.'' Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia, 120, 83-99.
  • Tyler, M.J. and Anstis, M. (1975). ''Taxonomy and biology of frogs of the Litoria citropa complex (Anura: Hylidae).'' Records of the South Australian Museum , 17(5), 41-50.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© AmphibiaWeb © 2000-2011 The Regents of the University of California

Source: AmphibiaWeb

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
Loss of habitat for farming and urbanization is a localized threat. Disturbances upstream of breeding sites are also a problem
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

No known declines and extent of occurrence > 20, 000km2.

Threats
Loss of habitat for farming and urbanisation. Disturbances upstream of breeding sites.

Conservation Measures
Protected where it occurs in rainforest or in National Parks.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Hero, J.-M., Littlejohn, M., and Marantelli, G. (1991). Frogwatch Field Guide to Victorian Frogs. Department of Conservation and Environment, Victoria.
  • Gillespie, G.R. and Hines, H.B. (1999). ''Status of temperate riverine frogs in south-eastern Australia.'' Declines and Disappearances of Australian Frogs. A. Campbell, eds., Environment Australia, Canberra, 109-130.
  • Anstis, M. and Littlejohn, M.J. (1996). ''The breeding biology of Litoria subglandulosa and L. citropa (Anura: Hylidae), and a re-evaluation of their geographic distribution.'' Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia, 120, 83-99.
  • Tyler, M.J. and Anstis, M. (1975). ''Taxonomy and biology of frogs of the Litoria citropa complex (Anura: Hylidae).'' Records of the South Australian Museum , 17(5), 41-50.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© AmphibiaWeb © 2000-2011 The Regents of the University of California

Source: AmphibiaWeb

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The species range includes several protected areas. It is sometimes bred in some Australian zoos.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Blue Mountains tree frog

The Blue Mountains tree frog, (Litoria citropa) is a species of tree frog native to the coastal and highland areas of eastern Australia, from just south of Newcastle NSW, to eastern VIC. The Jenolan Caves tree frog, a population formerly separated as L. jenolanensis, is nowadays included in this species.

Physical description[edit]

A green morph of Litoria citropa

This is a moderate sized frog, up to about 60 mm in length. Its dorsal surface is brown with a few darker flecks. There is a dark stripe that runs from the nostril, above the tympanum, to the groin. There is a lighter golden stripe above and adjacent to the dark stripe. The frog is normally green on the side of the head (under the eye), side and arms and legs. The amount of green on an individual frog can range from almost none at all to an all green colour morph (see images, both frogs from the same site). The green colour can occasionally be aqua-green. The armpit, thigh, groin, and inner section of the foot are bright red-orange in colour. The belly is white.

Ecology and behaviour[edit]

Blue Mountains tree frogs in amplexus

This species is associated with flowing rocky streams in woodland and wet or dry sclerophyll forest. This species has a two-part call, the first is a strong "warrrrrk" followed by a number a shorter notes, that sound like a golf ball going in a hole. Males call from streamside vegetation and rocks in the stream from spring to summer, normally after heavy rain.

This species is often found in highland areas, especially the Blue Mountains, hence its name. The species Litoria jenolanensis is suspected to be genetically the same as this species.

As a pet[edit]

It can be kept as a pet[1] in Australia, in captivity with the appropriate permit.

Diet[edit]

Tree frogs generally eat a variety of insects; in captivity, they eat gut-loaded crickets, their own tadpoles, guppies, spiders and worms.

Sources[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mark Davidson. 2005. Australian Reptile Keeper Publications. ISBN 0-9758200-0-1
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!