Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Adults of this slender bodied, long legged species reach a body length of 30 mm in males and 35 mm in females. The heel of the hind leg reaches forward to eye level. Tarsal pads are barely expanded. Coloration is typically pentalineate. Dorsal surface is light brown with dark middorsal and paramedian lines and an even darker dorsolateral piceous line running from eye to groin. A pale line extends from the upper lip to the tympanum. Dark spots cover the dorsal surface of the legs. Ventral surface is white with a yellowish hue.

  • Hoffman, R. L. (1963). ''Pseudacris brimleyi.'' Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles. American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists, 311.1-311.2.
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Distribution

Range Description

This species can be found from the Coastal Plain from southeastern Virginia to eastern Georgia, USA (Conant and Collins 1991).
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endemic to a single nation

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: (20,000-200,000 square km (about 8000-80,000 square miles)) Coastal Plain from southeastern Virginia to eastern Georgia (Conant and Collins 1991).

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Distribution and Habitat

Found in the Atlantic Coastal Plain from Bowling Green, Carolina Co., Virginia south to the eastern edge of Georgia. Inner localities approach the Fall Line. There are no records of this species in northern Virginia.

  • Hoffman, R. L. (1963). ''Pseudacris brimleyi.'' Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles. American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists, 311.1-311.2.
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Physical Description

Size

Length: 3 cm

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The habitat is in low areas in hardwood forests, swamps near rivers and streams, marshes, and wet open woods. Eggs and larvae develop in flooded ditches and shallow ponds.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Comments: Low areas in hardwood forests, swamps near rivers and streams, marshes, and wet open woods. Eggs and larvae develop in flooded ditches and shallow ponds.

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Migration

Non-Migrant: Yes. At least some populations of this species do not make significant seasonal migrations. Juvenile dispersal is not considered a migration.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Trophic Strategy

Comments: Metamorphosed frogs eat various small invertebrates. Larvae eat organic debris, algae, and plant tissue.

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Comments: Most active at night.

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Reproduction

Lays small loose clusters of eggs in winter and early spring. Aquatic larvae metamorphose into terrestrial form in about 40-60 days.

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Geoffrey Hammerson

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson, Neil Cox and Bruce Young)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a degree of habitat modification, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Intrinsic Vulnerability: Moderately vulnerable

Environmental Specificity: Moderate to broad.

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Population

Population
Many secure populations occur across the range.

Population Trend
Stable
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Breeding occurs from mid-February to mid-April. Eggs are laid in loose clumps. Total complement is around 300 eggs. Mature tadpoles are 30mm in length. Newly transformed froglets are about 10 mm long. Predation by Thamnophis sauritus is recorded in North Carolina.

  • Hoffman, R. L. (1963). ''Pseudacris brimleyi.'' Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles. American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists, 311.1-311.2.
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no known threats. Clear cutting and urbanization probably impact local populations.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no conservation measures needed. It occurs in many protected areas.
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Wikipedia

Brimley's chorus frog

Brimley's chorus frog (Pseudacris brimleyi) is a species of frog in the Hylidae family, endemic to the United States, and is named for North Carolina zoologist C.S. Brimley. Its natural habitats are temperate forests, rivers, intermittent rivers, swamps, freshwater marshes, intermittent freshwater marshes, ponds, open excavations, and canals and ditches. It is threatened by habitat loss.

References[edit]

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: A molecular phylogeny of Pseudacris based on mtDNA data (Moriarty and Cannatella 2004) revealed four strongly supported clades within Pseudacris: (1) A West Coast Clade containing regilla and cadaverina, (2) a Fat Frog Clade including ornata, streckeri, and illinoensis, (3) a Crucifer Clade consisting of crucifer and ocularis, and (4) a Trilling Frog Clade containing all other Pseudacris. Within the Trilling Frog Clade, brimleyi and brachyphona form the sister group to the Nigrita Clade: nigrita, feriarum, triseriata, kalmi, clarkii, and maculata. The Nigrita Clade shows geographic division into three clades: (1) populations of maculata and triseriata west of the Mississippi River and Canadian populations, (2) southeastern United States populations of feriarum and nigrita, and (3) northeastern United States populations of feriarum, kalmi, and triseriata. Current taxonomy does not reflect the phylogenetic relationships among populations of the Nigrita Clade (Moriarty and Canatella 2004). For example, the molecular data appear to indicate that triseriata, maculata, and clarkii in the western United States are conspecific, but the authors indicated that further sampling and analysis of the Trilling Frog Clade are needed before their relationships can be determined and an appropriate taxonomy established. Moriarty and Cannatella (2004) found that subspecific epithets for crucifer (crucifer and bartramiana) and nigrita (nigrita and verrucosa) are uninformative, and they therefore discouraged recognition of these subspecies. They concluded that further study is needed to determine if illinoensis warrants status as a distinct species. Molecular data were consistent with retention of regilla, cadaverina, ocularis, and crucifer in the genus Pseudacris.

See Highton and Hedges (1995, J. Herpetol. 29:419-425) for information on geographic protein variation. See Cocroft (1994) for a cladistic analysis of chorus frog phylogeny based on a combination of published morphological, biochemical, and behavioral data sets.

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