Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Chinese (Simplified) (5) (learn more)

Overview

Brief Summary

Biology

The serow is generally a solitary animal, although it may sometimes move about in groups of up to seven individuals (2). Each serow inhabits a small area which is well marked with trails, dung heaps, and scents (4). This small area of habitat is selected so it can provide all the needs of the serow, such as sufficient grass, shoots and leaves on which to feed on during the early morning and late evening, and suitable sheltered resting places in caves or under overhanging rocks and cliffs (2). This home range is defended against any intruding serows by using their dagger-like horns, which are also used by this rather aggressive goat-antelope to fight off predators (4), such as the snow leopard in Nepal (5). Although less specialised for climbing rugged mountains than some of its relatives (4), and with a somewhat slow and clumsy gait, the serow is nevertheless adept at descending steep, rocky slopes (2), and is also even known to swim between small islands in Malaysia (2). The serow is thought to mate primarily between October and November. The gestation period lasts for about seven months, with a single young usually born in the spring. Female serows usually reach sexual maturity at around 30 months, while males become sexually mature between 30 and 36 months of age (2).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

Belonging to a group known as the goat-antelopes, the serow is a rather small-bodied animal (4), with dark upperparts that vary in colour, and whitish underparts (2) (4). The hair of the coat is long and coarse, and a long mane of white, brown or black occurs on the neck (2) (4). Male and female serows are similar in appearance (4), with both bearing stout, slightly curved horns which can be used to defend themselves to deadly effect (2). The long ears are narrow and pointed, the face bears large scent glands below the eyes, and the tail is fairly bushy (2).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

Range Description

This species is found in Indonesia (Sumatra), Malaysia (Peninsular Malaya), Thailand (south of about 9°S latitude) (Grubb, 2005). In Indonesia (Sumatra), limited almost entirely to the volcanic mountain chain of the Barisan mountains which runs along the western spine of Sumatra from Aceh in the north to Lampung in the south. Although suitable habitat is more extensive within these mountains (Santiapillai and Widodo, 1989), there are only three known major concentrations: the Aceh highlands in the north, the Kerinci highlands in the centre and the Barisan Seletan highlands in the south. It is also found scattered through Peninsular (West) Malaysia, but concentrated in the northern states, especially Kelantan, Perlis and Perak. The species has been recorded in 50 areas in Peninsular Malaysia, but in each area, the number of animals is estimated to be only between 10 to 15 individuals.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Historic Range:
East Asia, Sumatra

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Geographic Range

Sumatran serows, Capricornis sumatraensis, are found on the Thai-Malay Peninsula and on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. There are three specific areas of highlands on the island of Sumatra that have been identified as supporting populations of C. sumatraensis: the Barisan mountains in the south, Aceh in the north, and Kerinci in the central part of the island.

Biogeographic Regions: oriental (Native )

  • Duckworth, J., R. Steinmetz, J. MacKinnon. 2008. "Capricornis sumatraensis" (On-line). IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Accessed March 15, 2010 at http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/3812/0.
  • Santiapillai, C., W. Ramono. 1994. The serow (Capricornis sumatraensis) - its status, distribution and conservation in Sumatra. Tigerpaper, 21(3): 15-19.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Range

With a wide range in East Asia, the serow can be found from north-eastern India, Nepal, Bhutan and Bangladesh, east through Myanmar and central and southern China, south through Cambodia, Lao PDR, Vietnam, Thailand and Malaysia, to Indonesia (2).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

In body shape, Sumatran serows resemble goats or antelopes. They are generally dark grey or black in color with backward pointing horns that narrow at the tips. The horns usually have a slight curve. A skin of C. sumatraensis measured 60 inches (approximately 152.4 cm) from nose to tail.

There is no information regarding sexual dimorphism in this species and standard measurements are not available. However, in a close relative, Capricornis crispus, both males and females were reported to weigh between 30 and 45 kg, with horns that averaged 12 to 16 cm in length.

At approximately 30 kg, Capricornis swinhoei, a close relative native to Taiwan, is slightly smaller than C. sumatraensis.

Other Physical Features: endothermic ; homoiothermic; bilateral symmetry

Sexual Dimorphism: sexes alike; ornamentation

  • Kishimoto, R., T. Kawamichi. 1996. Territoriality and monogamous pairs in a solitary ungulate, the Japanese serow, Capricornis crispus. Animal Behavior, 52: 673 - 682.
  • Ochiai, K., K. Susaki. 2002. Effects of Territoriality of Population Density in the Japanses serow (Capricornis crispus). Journal of Mammalogy, 83(4): 964-972.
  • Pocock, R. 1908. Notes upon some species and geographical races of Serows (Capricornis) and Gorals (Noemorhedus), based upon specimens exhibited in the Society's Gardens. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 1908: 173-202.
  • Wang, K., P. Chen. 1981. Notes on Formosan serow Capricornis crispus swinhoei at Taipei Zoo. International Zoo Yearbook, 21: 201-202.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It inhabits steep mountain slopes between 200 and 3,000 m (van der Zon, 1979), covered by both primary and secondary forests. The serow is predominantly a browser (Santiapillai and Widodo, 1989). It is usually solitary in nature, but small groups of up to seven have been observed (Nowak, 1991). It may occupy seasonal ranges and use well marked trails that often run along ridges of steep hills. Sumatran serow feed in the early hours of the morning and in late evenings, sheltering under overhanging cliffs and rocks during the rest of the day. No information on Sumatran serow reproduction is available.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Capricornis sumatraensis is found in mountainous areas at altitudes of between 200 and 3,000 m. It resides mainly in forests and is frequently found near cliffs.

A close relative, Capricornis milneedwardsi, inhabits areas near the top of steep slopes with high densities of shrubs.

Range elevation: 200 to 3,000 m.

Habitat Regions: tropical ; terrestrial

Terrestrial Biomes: forest ; mountains

  • Chen, W., J. Hu, X. Lu. 2009. Habitat use and separation between the Chinese serow (Capricornis milneedwardsi) and the Chinese goral (Naemorhedus griseus) in winter. Mammali, 73: 249-252.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Serows inhabit rugged mountains and rocky outcrops, covered with thick, moist vegetation or forest, up to an elevation of 2,700 metres (2) (4).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Trophic Strategy

Food Habits

Sumatran serows are forest browsers and appear to prefer nutrient-rich vegetation, though they eat nearly any type of vegetation if nothing else is available. Multiple individuals are occasionally found feeding together in areas high in resources. A close relative, Capricornis swinhoei, has been observed in captivity to feed primarily during the evening hours and at night. Another close relative, Capricornis milneedwardsi, eats primarily the leaves and twigs from deciduous broadleaved trees.

Plant Foods: leaves

Primary Diet: herbivore (Folivore )

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

Ecosystem Roles

Other ungulates such as wild pigs, rusa deer, and barking deer or muntjacs share the Sumatran serow's habitat. There may be some overlap in diet between Capricornis species and other ungulate genera.

In captivity, Capricornis sumatraensis has been observed to host external parasites, such as large fleas. Nematode larvae have also been found in feces of captive individuals.

Commensal/Parasitic Species:

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Predation

Sumatran serows typically select bedding sites that are protected from the wind, but not secluded enough to allow a predator to sneak up on the resting serow. There is nothing in the literature regarding which predators prey on C. sumatraensis, however Lovari and Locati (1994) mention that serows sometimes occupy the same habitat as big cats such as leopards and tigers, which likely prey on them.

Predation does not appear to have a major impact on population density of the closely related Japanese serow, Capricornis crispus.

Known Predators:

Anti-predator Adaptations: cryptic

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Communication and Perception

Observations of C. crispus indicate that kids recognize their mother by sound.

Capricornis sumatraensis has preorbital and interdigital scent glands. These glands are used to mark boundaries of territories. Capricornis swinhoei, a close relative that exhibits behavior very similar to that of C. sumatraensis, produces a high-pitched alarm call.

Communication Channels: visual ; acoustic ; chemical

Other Communication Modes: scent marks

Perception Channels: visual ; acoustic

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Life Expectancy

Lifespan/Longevity

The maximum lifespan observed in a close relative, Capricornis crispus, is 20 to 21 years for males and 21 to 22 years for females. At birth, females have shorter life expectancies, 4.8 to 5.1 years, compared to males, with life expectancies of 5.3 to 5.5 years.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

Maximum longevity: 18.5 years (captivity) Observations: One wild born specimen lived 18.5 years in captivity (Richard Weigl 2005). It has been reported that these animals live up to 21 years (Bernhard Grzimek 1990), which is possible but unconfirmed.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Joao Pedro de Magalhaes

Source: AnAge

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Reproduction

The mating system of C. sumatraensis has not been described, but a close relative, Capricornis crispus, commonly forms monogamous pairs. A single pair will often stay together for multiple years, each sex maintaining a territory that overlaps with the territory of its mate. Occasionally, polygynous groups form, but since females maintain their own individual territories, it is difficult for the male to guard multiple females. A typical pair bond lasts approximately 4.6 years.

The breeding season of C. sumatraensis occurs between the months of October and November. Gestation lasts approximately 7 months and, in one recorded instance of a captive Sumatran serow, birth occurred in early June. Usually the mother gives birth to 1 offspring.

Little is known about growth and development of young Sumatran serows, but in Capricornis crispus, a close relative with a similar gestation period, young stop being dependent on their mother at about 1 year of age, but stay in their mother's territory for 2 to 4 years. Capricornis crispus females reach sexual maturity at about three years of age.

Breeding interval: Sumatran serow breeds yearly.

Breeding season: Breeding occurs in October and November.

Average number of offspring: 1.

Average gestation period: 7 months.

Key Reproductive Features: iteroparous ; seasonal breeding ; gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); viviparous

Parental care in Capricornis sumatraensis has not been described. However, in a close relative, Capricornis crispus, the mother is the sole care provider for her young. Shortly after birth, the serow kid is able to travel with its mother as she forages for food. In C. crispus, a mother and kid will often stay close to the area where the kid was born for the first few days after birth. Capricornis crispus mothers are occasionally observed between the months of May and July without their kid, which suggests that kids sometimes hide for short periods of time.

Parental Investment: precocial ; female parental care ; pre-fertilization (Provisioning, Protecting: Female); pre-hatching/birth (Provisioning: Female, Protecting: Female); pre-weaning/fledging (Provisioning: Female, Protecting: Female)

  • Galstaun, B., J. West. 1982. Notes on Breeding the Sumatran Serow (Capricornis sumatraensis). Zoologische Garten, 53(2): 66-72.
  • Kishimoto, R. 1989. Early mother and kid behavior of a typical "follower," Japanese serow Capricornis crispus. Mammalia, 53(2): 165-176.
  • Kishimoto, R., T. Kawamichi. 1996. Territoriality and monogamous pairs in a solitary ungulate, the Japanese serow, Capricornis crispus. Animal Behavior, 52: 673 - 682.
  • Ochiai, K., K. Susaki. 2002. Effects of Territoriality of Population Density in the Japanses serow (Capricornis crispus). Journal of Mammalogy, 83(4): 964-972.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Capricornis sumatraensis

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Capricornis sumatraensis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
VU
Vulnerable

Red List Criteria
A2cd

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Duckworth, J.W., Steinmetz, R. & MacKinnon, J.

Reviewer/s
Harris, R. & Festa-Bianchet, M. (Caprinae Red List Authority)

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is listed as Vulnerable because this species is believed to be in significant decline (probably at a rate of mores than 30% over three generations, taken at 21 years) because of both over-hunting and serious habitat loss taking place within its range.

History
  • 1996
    Endangered
  • 1994
    Endangered
    (Groombridge 1994)
  • 1990
    Endangered
    (IUCN 1990)
  • 1988
    Endangered
    (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1988)
  • 1986
    Endangered
    (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1986)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Current Listing Status Summary

Status: Endangered
Date Listed: 06/14/1976
Lead Region: Foreign (Region 10) 
Where Listed: Entire


Population detail:

Population location: Entire
Listing status: E

For most current information and documents related to the conservation status and management of Naemorhedus sumatraensis, see its USFWS Species Profile

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

In 2008, C. sumatraensis was listed as vulnerable by the IUCN Redlist. It is estimated that there are between 500 and 750 individuals in Malaysia, but there are no data on population size in Indonesia. The main threat for Sumatran serows is loss of habitat. Capricornis sumatraensis requires thick forest, and forests in its range are being cut due to agriculture and the demand for timber. Many Sumatran serows are also injured or killed by poachers when they are caught in traps meant for other animals. Capricornis sumatraensis is protected by law in Indonesia and Malaysia, as are certain parts of the animal’s habitat. Both Indonesia and Malaysia have conservation plans that aim to educate people living near serows, reduce habitat loss, and protect remaining habitat, to prevent the serow population from declining further.

US Federal List: endangered

CITES: appendix i

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: vulnerable

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Status

Classified as Vulnerable (VU) on the IUCN Red List 2007 (1) and listed on Appendix I of CITES (3). Subspecies: Capricornis sumatraensis sumatraensis (Sumatran serow) and C .s. rubidus (red serow) are classified as Endangered (EN), C .s. milneedwardsii (Chinese serow), C. s. maritimus (Indochinese serow) and C. s. thar (Himalayan serow) are classified as Vulnerable (VU) on the IUCN Red List 2007 (1).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
No population estimates have been made in Indonesia. Although vulnerable to poaching and habitat destruction, serow appears to thrive well in some of the better protected areas such as Gunung Leuser National Park. Here the serow population may be healthy and increasing (M. Griffiths pers. comm., 1992). The species is considered 'rare' in Taratak Forest Reserve, Sumatra, Indonesia, based on a camera trapping survey undertaken in 2005.

In Malaysia, Mustafa et al. (1990) conducted a reconnaissance survey in the Pelangai Forest Reserve, Negeri Sembilan (3,107 ha), in an effort to determine the number of serow present before a capture operation started. Thirteen animals were recorded in this area, giving a density of 0.4 serow/km². The total number of serow estimated for Peninsular Malaysia is between 500 and 750 animals, scattered through many, very small, isolated populations, though the basis for these numbers is very unclear. It is said not to be common in the Malay peninsula (Kwai HinHan pers. comm.).

Population Trend
Decreasing
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
Within Indonesia, habitat destruction threatens the long-term survival of serow. The principal causes of habitat destruction are slash-and-burn agriculture practiced by highlanders and shifting cultivators, and the indiscriminate extraction of timber for export to the West. Poaching is not uncommon, and serows are caught in snares set for other game species, as well as shot, for local consumption of the meat, and for use of body parts in traditional medicines. Hunting occurs inside and outside of protected areas. Sources living around protected areas in Sumatra, such as the Gunung Leuser National Park, Aceh, claim that hunting continues to increase as illegal logging roads have opened up parts of the park, allowing access to previously inaccessible areas. Locals claim that populations of this species are in decline. Trade of parts, especially the horns, is carried out openly in some places, such as in the town of Pancur Batu, North Sumatra. No enforcement action against individuals trading in Serow parts has taken place in these locations.

Threats in Malaysia come mainly from disturbance and from habitat destruction caused by mining activities in the limestone and quartz ridge quarries within their habitat, and by deforestation of the hill dipterocarp forests for logging and agriculture. Serows also suffer from substantial poaching for its meat and body parts that are used for medicinal purposes. In Malaysia, a number of small populations exist, but are threatened by illegal hunting, with this species sometimes being a target, not just an opportunistic kill. In Malaysia, this species does appear to be tolerant of some human disturbance, and in some areas, occurs very near human habitation. Over the past two years, enforcement authorities have taken action against individuals involved in illegal hunting of this species, and as a result, trade in this species is not carried out openly, as it is in other Southeast Asian range States. Very little information on current populations of this species exists. However, local people living near serow habitat state that populations may be declining, due to hunting and due to quarrying of limestone and quartz areas. Some wildlife restaurants in Malaysia offer the meat of this species.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Throughout its large range, the serow faces a number of significant and varied threats, the impact of each depending on location (6). The serow is heavily hunted for its meat and fur, as well as for other body parts which are believed to hold some medicinal value (2). Habitat destruction poses a considerable threat, with logging and clearance for agriculture greatly affecting the habitat of the serow in numerous areas, and mining may impact the habitat of populations in Malaysia (6). Other threats include the vast numbers of landmines in Cambodia, and avalanches in the mountainous land of Nepal which can cause a considerable number of deaths in serow populations during winters of heavy snowfall. In addition, serows can often become trapped in snares set for other animals (6). The serow subspecies of Bangladesh (C. s. rubidus) and peninsular Malaysia and Sumatra (C. s. sumatraensis) are particularly threatened, having been greatly reduced in numbers and distribution through habitat loss and excessive hunting (2).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is listed on Appendix I of CITES.

In Indonesia (Sumatra), has been protected by law since 1932. A total of 3,083,308 ha of serow habitat are under some form of protection in a system of protected areas that includes three national parks, three game reserves, three nature reserves and two protected forests. However, many of these areas await gazetting and staffing, and in the absence of these actions they are little more than “paper” parks. Conservation measures proposed for Indonesia: 1) Conduct surveys along the Barisan mountain chain to determine current status, and to identify if there are any other viable populations of serow outside the currently known, main concentrations areas. 2) Maintain natural forest cover along the volcanic spine of Sumatra, free from roads, agriculture, timber extraction and other human encroachment. This offers the best hope for the serow’s long-term survival in Indonesia (Santiapillai and Widodo 1989). 3) maintain the strict protection of reserves where viable serow populations still exist; this must remain the prime concern. Protected areas where serow now occur must be properly zoned and managed. 4) Strictly protect the core areas which incorporate the feeding and breeding areas, to avoid interactions with humans. 5) Design land-use activities in the vicinity of serow reserves so that they are compatible with serow conservation. 6) Adopt measures to improve the living conditions of people existing along the periphery of serow reserves. 7) Publicize the plight of the serow to the people through sensible conservation education programs.

The Sumatran serow is totally protected under the Wildlife Act (76/72) of Peninsular Malaysia. Enforcement is carried out by the Department of Wildlife and National Park’s Enforcement Division. Serow occur in seven protected areas, but unfortunately these neither represent typical serow habitat, nor are they adequate to ensure its survival. Serow is also found in six proposed protected areas. Small captive breeding groups of serow are held at Zoo Negara (Vellayan, 1989) and Zoo Melaka. Conservation measures proposed for Malaysia: Implement the serow conservation strategy developed by the Department of Wildlife and National Parks, Peninsular Malaysia. This strategy includes: 1) Develop management plans and the application of appropriate wildlife management techniques to conserve and enhance serow populations. The management goals are to: 2) establish and conserve genetically viable populations in protected wildlife reserves, national parks, permanent forest reserves, and other forested areas and limestone hills; 3) protect areas which contain serow and manage them for an optimum sustainable population; and 4) establish a captive breeding population for future re-introduction of serow into protected areas. Specific management objectives and recommendations identified to meet these goals include: 5) co-ordinate actions of conservation agencies with those of agencies involved in quarrying and logging operations, to promote wildlife conservation; 6) develop a public education program; 7) increase effectiveness of law enforcement; 8) train personnel; 9) improve habitat management and conservation by increasing thenumber of protected areas; and 10) carry out ecological and biological research.

The taxonomic validity of this species, and its relationship to other species in the genus Capricornis needs to be assessed.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

The serow occurs in numerous protected areas throughout its large range (6), and is also listed on Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), meaning that international commercial trade in this species is prohibited (3). However, more specific conservation measures, particularly for the two Endangered subspecies (C. s. sumatraensis and C .s. rubidus) may be necessary for this species' long-term survival (6).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Economic Importance for Humans: Negative

A close relative, Capricornis crispus, occasionally eats crops.

  • Deguchi, Y., S. Sato, K. Sugawara. 2002. Food plant selection by the wild Japanese serow (Capricornis crispus) with reference to the traces eaten. Animal Science Journal, 73: 67-72.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Economic Importance for Humans: Positive

Throughout Asia, multiple species of serow are hunted for medicinal purposes and for their meat. The meat of the Formosan serow, Capricornis swinhoei, is highly valued in Taiwan. Some local people hunt C. sumatraensis for its meat, despite it being protected, because the locals believe that serow meat is better than meat that is more readily available, such as meat from goats. However, this hunting poses a threat to populations.

Positive Impacts: food

  • Corlett, R. 2007. Impact of Hunting on Mammalia Fauna of Tropical Asian Forests. Biotropica, 39(3): 292-303.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Sumatran serow

The Sumatran serow (Capricornis sumatraensis), also known as the southern serow, is a species of goat-antelope native to mountain forests in the Thai-Malay Peninsula and on the Indonesian island of Sumatra.[2] The former name of this species is "mainland serow", as all the mainland species of serow (Chinese, red and Himalayan) used to be considered subspecies of this species. The Sumatran serow is threatened due to habitat loss and hunting, leading to it being evaluated as vulnerable by the IUCN.[2]

References [edit]

  1. ^ Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M., eds. (2005). Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494. 
  2. ^ a b c Duckworth, J.W., Steinmetz, R. & MacKinnon, J. (2008). Capricornis sumatraensis. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 2010-04-04.
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!