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Overview

Brief Summary

Description

Long-tailed Voles need cool, moist habitats, so they are found mostly near the peaks of mountain ranges. Fruits and seeds make up the bulk of their diet, but they also eat fungi, bark, and leaves if necessary. Long-tailed Voles live less than one year on average, and females produce only two litters during that time, with an average of five pups per litter. Owls and hawks prey on them, as do some mammals, including martens, long-tailed weasels, and ermine.

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  • Original description: Merriam, C.H., 1888.  Description of a new species of meadow mouse from the Black Hills of Dakota, p. 934.  The American Naturalist, 22:934-935.
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Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs in western North America; from east-central Alaska (United States), south through western Canada and the western United States to southern California, Arizona, and New Mexico, and east to Colorado. Populations at the eastern and southern edges of its range are generally restricted to high elevations in isolated mountains. The elevational range is from sea level up to at least 3,650 m asl.
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Geographic Range

Long-tailed voles are found throughout the western United States and Canada up through southeastern Alaska. Different regions are home to different population densities.

Biogeographic Regions: nearctic (Native )

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occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: Western North America; from east-central Alaska south through western Canada and the western U.S. to southern California, Arizona, and New Mexico, east to Colorado. Populations at eastern and southern edges of range generally restricted to high elevations in isolated mountains. Elevational range: sea level to at least 3650 m.

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Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

Long-tailed voles are small bodied with long, bicolored tails. Body mass ranges from 20 to 85 g and total length from 150 to 250 mm. The tail is about 30% of their total length. The fur color of these animals varies with its location on the body. The dorsal fur is usually grayish brown with black tips, while the ventral fur is usually light gray color. The skull has a wide braincase, large bullae, a long rostrum, and long incisive foramina. The cheektooth pattern of this type of vole looks prismatic.

Range mass: 20 to 85 g.

Range length: 150 to 250 mm.

Other Physical Features: endothermic ; homoiothermic; bilateral symmetry

Average basal metabolic rate: 0.383 W.

  • Smolen, M., B. Keller. 1987. Microtus longicaudus. Mammalian Species, 271: 1-7.
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Size

Length: 20 cm

Weight: 58 grams

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Size in North America

Sexual Dimorphism: Males are larger than females.

Length:
Range: 155-202 mm

Weight:
Range: 36-59 g
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is found in various habitats ranging from dense coniferous forests to rocky alpine tundra, sagebrush semidesert, moist meadows, marshes, along rivers and streams and forest-edge habitat. It frequently occurs in disturbed areas, such as clear-cuts, surface mines, and those that have been fire-impacted. It usually does not make well-defined runways.

Breeds mid-May to mid-September in Alaska and Idaho, May-October in Nevada (mostly June-July). In Alberta females will have one to four litters per year (average two). In Alaska, females will have a maximum of two litters during a lifetime. Litter size is an average of four in Alberta, and five in Alaska (Smolen and Keller 1987). Young of year breed in Alberta, not in Alaska.

These voles seldom live more than one year. They may be displaced by the more aggressive M. montanus (Smolen and Keller 1987). Diet includes green vegetation, seeds, berries, and fungi. In winter they may feed on inner bark of shrubs and trees. They are active throughout the year. Most observed activity in Alaska was nocturnal (Smolen and Keller 1987).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Long-tailed voles occupy a variety of habitats. Some examples of theses habitats include dry grassy areas, mountain slopes, forests, stream banks, sagebrush grasslands, mountain meadows, and riparian zones. Within all of these different types of landscape, long-tailed voles burrow and sometimes create runways underground. In Wyoming, the elevation at which this species can be found is 900 to 3300 meters.

Range elevation: 900 to 3,300 m.

Habitat Regions: temperate ; terrestrial

Terrestrial Biomes: savanna or grassland ; forest ; mountains

Other Habitat Features: riparian

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Comments: Various habitats ranging from dense coniferous forests to rocky alpine tundra, sagebrush semidesert, moist meadows, marshes, and forest-edge habitat; also recently cut or burned forest. Usually does not make well-defined runways.

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Migration

Non-Migrant: Yes. At least some populations of this species do not make significant seasonal migrations. Juvenile dispersal is not considered a migration.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Trophic Strategy

Food Habits

Like many rodents, long-tailed voles are herbivores. They feast on green plants, tree roots and bark, flowers, underground fungi, fruits, and seeds. Sometimes they will eat insects. Foraging for these food items occurs on the ground and underneath shrubs.

Animal Foods: insects

Plant Foods: leaves; roots and tubers; wood, bark, or stems; seeds, grains, and nuts; fruit

Other Foods: fungus

Primary Diet: herbivore (Folivore , Granivore , Lignivore, Eats sap or other plant foods)

  • Cahalane, V. 1947. Mammals of North America. New York: MacMillan Co..
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Comments: Green vegetation, seeds, berries, and fungi. In winter may feed on inner bark of shrubs and trees.

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Associations

Ecosystem Roles

Long-tailed voles play an important role in local ecosystems. As short-lived, rapidly reproducing herbivores, they provide an important prey base for many carnivores. They are undoubtedly vital to local fod webs.

Ecosystem Impact: keystone species

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Predation

That long-tailed voles are frequent victims of predation is not doubted. However, the quantity of long-tailed voles consumed by such predators is unknown-- paartly because of similarities between the skull morphology of this species and that of Microtus montanus, another popular prey item. When such remains are found, it is difficult to distinguish which species is present.

Known Predators:

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Known predators

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Known prey organisms

Microtus longicaudus preys on:
fungi
Insecta

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
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General Ecology

Populations fluctuate dramatically. Population densities are usually relatively low but may build up to 40 or more/ha (Jones et al. 1983). Seldom lives more than 1 year. May be displaced by more aggressive M. MONTANUS (Smolen and Keller 1987).

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Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Communication and Perception

Information about communication in this species is scant. However, most microtines are known to use some vocalizationsm and it is likely that M. longicaudud is similar in that repsect. The neonates of this species are known to make an ultrasonic cry when disturbed, alerting the mother to their distress.

Communication Channels: tactile ; acoustic

Perception Channels: visual ; acoustic ; ultrasound

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Cyclicity

Comments: Active throughout the year. Most observed activity in Alaska was nocturnal (Smolen and Keller 1987).

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Life Expectancy

Lifespan/Longevity

Most long-tailed voles live for from 2 to 16 months. The average lifespan is about one year. Females usually live longer than males.

Typical lifespan

Status: wild:
2 to 16 months.

Average lifespan

Status: wild:
12 months.

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Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

Observations: In the wild, these animals rarely live more than a year. Two females have been reported to live 1.1 years (Smolen and Keller 1987). Maximum longevity is unknown.
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Reproduction

No information found.

Like many rodents, long-tailed voles have a breeding season that stretches from May to October. Individuals located farther north have a shorter breeding season. For example, those populations in Alaska have a season extending from mid-May to mid-September. After reaching sexual maturity, females have a maximum of two litters in their lifetime. Female voles may reach sexual maturity by 3 weeks of age.

Pregnant voles construct nests made of plant material and fibers in their burrows. This is where the females give birth to their young. Litters typically contain from 3 to 6 young. The average gestation period is 20 to 23 days.

Breeding interval: These voles may breed twice during a breeding season.

Breeding season: May to October

Range number of offspring: 3 to 6.

Range gestation period: 20 to 23 days.

Average age at sexual or reproductive maturity (female): 3 weeks.

Key Reproductive Features: iteroparous ; seasonal breeding ; gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); fertilization ; viviparous

Average number of offspring: 5.22.

Although details on the development and parental care of this species are lacking, voles are known to give birth to altricial young. These young typically reside in the mother's nest and are nursed there until they are able to forage on their own. Male parental care has not been reported in these animals.

Parental Investment: no parental involvement; altricial ; pre-fertilization (Protecting: Female); pre-hatching/birth (Provisioning: Female, Protecting: Female); pre-weaning/fledging (Provisioning: Female, Protecting: Female); pre-independence (Protecting: Female)

  • Smolen, M., B. Keller. 1987. Microtus longicaudus. Mammalian Species, 271: 1-7.
  • Colorado State University. 2003. "Managing voles in Colorado" (On-line ). Colorado State University Cooperative Extension. Accessed 04/11/03 at http://www.ext.colostate.edu/PUBS/NATRES/06507.html.
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Breeds mid-May to mid-September in Alaska and Idaho, May-October in Nevada (mostly June-July). Litters/year: 1-4 in Alberta (average 2); maximum of 2 litters during lifetime for Alaska females. Litter size is 2-8; average 4 in Alberta, 5 in Alaska (Smolen and Keller 1987). Young of year breed in Alberta, not in Alaska.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Microtus longicaudus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 17
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Linzey, A.V. & NatureServe (Hammerson, G.)

Reviewer/s
Amori, G. (Small Nonvolant Mammal Red List Authority) & Chanson, J. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern because it is very widespread, common, somewhat adaptable and occurs in several protected areas.
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Long-tailed voles are considered non-game mammals but are protected by many state governments. If one of these voles causes a major problem, it may be captured or killed.

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: least concern

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Population

Population
This species is considered secure within its range (NatureServe). Populations fluctuate dramatically. Population densities are usually relatively low (typically 5-16 per hectare) but may build up to 40 or more per hectare (Jones et al. 1983).

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no major threats to this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is not of conservation concern and it occurs in several protected areas within its range.
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Economic Importance for Humans: Negative

Long-tailed voles are a nuisance for many people. They burrow, which causes destruction to the orchards and forests above. Also, they eat many crops (such as grains, potatoes, alfalfa, etc.) and other plant material resulting in more damage. Similar to other wild rodents and larger wild mammals, these voles can carry disease organisms, which can be transmitted to humans through contact. It is advised to be cautious when handling these animals.

Negative Impacts: injures humans (carries human disease); crop pest; causes or carries domestic animal disease

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Economic Importance for Humans: Positive

It is unlikely that these animals provide any direct economic benefit to humans. However, because they are important prey animals, they do affect other species that humans find interesting an important. Many avian predators that people like to watch, such as falcons, hawks, and owls seem to rely on these animals for food.

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Wikipedia

Long-tailed vole

The long-tailed vole (Microtus longicaudus) is a small vole found in western North America. The Coronation Island vole, once considered to be a separate species, is now believed to be a subspecies.

They have short ears and a long tail. Their fur is grey brown with light grey underparts. They are 18 cm long with an 8 cm tail and weigh about 50 g.

These animals are found in alpine meadows and shrubby areas, often near streams, from Alaska to California. They feed on green plants in summer and roots and bark in winter, when they burrow under the snow. Predators include owls and mustelids.

The female vole has 1 to 3 litters of 4 to 8 young.

They are active year-round, usually during the day.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Linzey, A.V. & NatureServe (Hammerson, G.) (2008). Microtus longicaudus. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 22 June 2009. Database entry includes a brief justification of why this species is of last concern.
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Subspecies coronarius formerly was (and by some recent authros still is) regarded as a distinct species; it was recognized as a subspecies or synonym of M. longicaudus by Jones et al. (1992), Baker et al. (2003), and Musser and Carleton (in Wilson and Reeder 1993, 2005). Extensive karyotypic and molecular variation suggests the need for further taxonomic investigation (Musser and Carleton).

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