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Overview

Distribution

Anhui, Fujian, Gansu, N Guangdong, N Guangxi, E Guizhou, Henan, W Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, Shaanxi, Sichuan, Yunnan, Zhejiang; also widely cultivated in S China
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Trees to 35 m tall; trunk to 2 m d.b.h.; branchlets arranged in a plane, pendulous, green, slender, flattened, ca. 1 mm wide. Leaves densely appressed, scalelike, dimorphic, 1-1.5 mm, apex sharply pointed; facial pairs with a linear abaxial gland; lateral pairs folded face-to-face, overlapping basal part of facial pairs, ridged abaxially. Pollen cones ellipsoid or ovoid, 2.5-5 mm; microsporophylls 10-14. Seed cones dark brown when ripe, globose, 0.8-1.5 cm in diam.; cone scales 6-8(-12), 5-angular, each fertile scale with 3-5(or 6) seeds. Seeds light brown, lustrous, obovate-rhombic or suborbicular, flattened, 2.5-3.5 mm. Cotyledons 2. Pollination Mar-May, seed maturity May-Jun. 2n = 22*.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Chamaecyparis funebris (Endlicher) Franco; Cupressus funebris var. gracilis Carriere.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology

This species is found in mixed mountain forest or (degraded) woodland associated with Platycarya strobilacea, Vitex negundo, Ligustrum sp., Viburnum sp., Pittosporum sp., Myrsine africana, and Vitex negundo; in calcareous soil or in sandy loam over sandstone; also widely planted and probably invading into disturbed vegetation locally. The altitudinal range of this species is between 300 m and 2260 m a.s.l. The above information refers to the habitat of extant naturalized populations and cannot be reliably considered an accurate description of the species in its true wild state.


Systems
  • Terrestrial
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* Below 2000 m.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Cupressus funebris

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cupressus funebris

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 11
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
DD
Data Deficient

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Xiang, Q., Christian, T. & Zhang, D

Reviewer/s
Thomas, P. & Farjon, A.

Contributor/s

Justification
There is currently no way, without intensive fieldwork and study, to ascertain the true extent of wild populations and their conservation status due to the extent to which the species has been planted and subsequently naturalized across very large areas of central and southern China. The “natural habitat” referred to in the earlier assessment is unknown, therefore it is not possible to justify the Near Threatened category. It is just as likely that this species could be of Least Concern as it is that it could be Critically Endangered in the wild. Therefore it is assessed as Data Deficient until further information becomes available.
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Population

Population
The extent (and indeed existence) of natural populations of Cupressus funebris is unknown at the current time.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
The wide distribution of this species cited in the Chinese literature (including Flora of China 4: 67. 1999) is to a large extent based on planted or introduced trees outside the indisputably wild populations. Occurrence in natural forests is rare due to widespread deforestation and alteration of natural vegetation in much of central China. The possibility of secondary establishment from cultivated trees outside its original range makes evaluation of threat to wild populations of this species extremely difficult. This species is not considered to be threatened, but its natural habitat (mixed conifer-angiosperm forest) certainly is.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is recorded from several protected areas; however it is uncertain if they are the result of introductions or naturalization.
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Wikipedia

Cupressus funebris

Cupressus funebris (Chinese Weeping Cypress) is a species of cypress native to southwestern and central China.[1] It may also occur naturally in Vietnam.[2]

Description[edit]

Cupressus funebris is a medium-sized coniferous tree growing to 20-35 m tall, with a trunk up to 2 m diameter. The foliage grows in dense, usually moderately decumbent and pendulous sprays of bright green, very slender, slightly flattened shoots.

The leaves are scale-like, 1-2 mm long, up to 5 mm long on strong lead shoots; young trees up to about 5-10 years old have juvenile foliage with soft needle-like leaves 3-8 mm long.

The seed cones are globose, 8-15 mm long, with 6-10 scales (usually 8), green, maturing dark brown about 24 months after pollination. The cones open at maturity to shed the seed. The pollen cones are 3-5 mm long, and release pollen in early spring.

Foliage with pollen and seed cones

Distribution[edit]

The precise natural range of Cupressus funebris is uncertain due to a long history of cultivation. Trees are recorded from forest habitats in the provinces of Guizhou, Hunan, and Chongqing.

More generally, it also occurs in Anhui, Fujian, southern Gansu, Guangdong, Guangxi, Henan, Hubei, Jiangxi, Shaanxi, Sichuan, Yunnan and Zhejiang, typically planted around monasteries and temples or in gardens.

Whether Cupressus funebris naturally occurs also in northern Vietnam is uncertain; if so, it probably is the most threatened conifer of that country.[2]

Cultivation[edit]

Cupressus funebris is cultivated as an ornamental tree, due to its graciously weeping form and texture, and planted in gardens and public parks in other warm temperate regions, such as California. It is used as a houseplant and conservatory tree in colder climates.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Conifer Specialist Group (1998). "Cupressus funebris". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2011.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 15 April 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Luu, Nguyen Duc To; Philip Ian Thomas (2004). Conifers of Vietnam. ISBN 1-872291-64-3. 

Further reading[edit]

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Notes

Comments

Often classified in Chamaecyparis on account of its flattened foliage sprays and relatively few seeds in small cones; however, it is here placed in Cupressus because of its developmental characters (cones maturing in 2nd year) and chemical composition of biflavones.
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