Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Spanish (1) (learn more)

Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is indigenous to Bhutan and NE India (Arunachal Pradesh); it is planted widely in the region near Buddhist monasteries and temples in E Nepal, Sikkim, Bhutan, Xizang [Tibet], and Arunachal Pradesh.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
A very large emergent in evergreen angiosperm forest dominated by Quercus, with lauraceous trees in the understorey; also with Tsuga dumosa near the upper limit, and on rocky (limestone) cliffs in pure stands. There are two possible strategies involved: late successional stands depend on episodal disturbance for regeneration, and extra-zonal avoidance of competition on exposed cliffs. The altitudinal range is from 1,250m to 2,670 m a.s.l. The climate in optimal stands is strongly influenced by summer monsoon rains, with ca. 800-2,000 mm annual precipitation.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Cupressus cashmeriana

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cupressus cashmeriana

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 4
Specimens with Barcodes: 4
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
NT
Near Threatened

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Zhang, D & Christian, T.

Reviewer/s
Thomas, P. & Farjon, A.

Contributor/s

Justification
The area of occupancy is much less than 500 km2 and contains a severely fragmented population. There are probably 19 locations. Recent decline is suspected to have occurred but its extent is uncertain. Although this species does not meet the criteria for EN or for VU, it is close to the threshold and is therefore assessed as Near Threatened.

History
  • 1998
    Vulnerable
  • 1997
    Vulnerable
    (Walter and Gillett 1998)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
Populations do not appear to be large.

Population Trend
Unknown
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
The scarcity of localities where this species appears to grow naturally, with often few large trees present (Prof. H. Ern of Berlin, pers. comm.), as well as the general desirability of cupressaceous wood in E Asia in connection with religious and other traditional buildings, indicate a serious vulnerability of the remaining wild populations. However, its natural distribution has only recently been evaluated and there is no clear evidence of serious decline over the past three generations.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Protection largely takes the form of ex situ conservation by planting of individual trees in villages and near monasteries and temples.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Cupressus cashmeriana

Cupressus cashmeriana (Bhutan cypress, Kashmir cypress, weeping cypress;[1] Dzongkha language: Tsenden) is a species of cypress native to the eastern Himalaya in Bhutan and adjacent areas of Arunachal Pradesh in northeastern India. It is also introduced in China and Nepal.[1] It grows at moderately high altitudes of 1,250–2,800 metres (4,100–9,200 ft).[2]

Description[edit]

Cupressus cashmeriana is a medium-sized to large coniferous tree growing 20–45 metres (66–148 ft) tall, rarely much more, with a trunk up to 3 metres (9.8 ft) diameter. The foliage grows in strongly pendulous sprays of blue-green, very slender, flattened shoots. The leaves are scale-like, 1–2 mm long, up to 5 mm long on strong lead shoots; young trees up to about 5 years old have juvenile foliage with soft needle-like leaves 3–8 mm long.[2]

The seed cones are ovoid, 10–21 mm long and 10–19 mm broad, with 8–12 scales, dark green, maturing dark brown about 24 months after pollination. The cones open at maturity to shed the seed. The pollen cones are 3–5 mm long, and release pollen in early spring.

A tree of 95 metres (312 ft) tall has recently been reported,[3] but the measurements await verification.

Symbolism and uses[edit]

The Bhutan cypress is the official national tree of Bhutan, where it is often associated with Buddhist religious places. It has been widely planted around Vihara monasteries and Buddhist temples there for centuries.

Cultivation[edit]

Cupressus cashmeriana is widely grown horticulturally as an ornamental tree, both within its native region and internationally in temperate climates. It is planted in private gardens and public parks. Many of the plants available outside of its native range are named cultivars, selected for particular forms, textures, or foliage colours, such as very pendulous branching or shoots, a fastigate or columnar shape, or a particularly bright blue or silvery glaucous foliage.

This plant has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.[4]

Conservation[edit]

The natural populations of this species are fragmented. There are few occurrences and they contain few large individuals. Cypress wood is in demand locally.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Zhang, D. & T. Christian. 2013. Cupressus cashmeriana. In: IUCN 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.1. Downloaded on 27 July 2013.
  2. ^ a b Cupressus cashmeriana. The Gymnosperm Database.
  3. ^ Farjon, A. (2005). Monograph of Cupressaceae and Sciadopitys. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. ISBN 1-84246-068-4
  4. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Cupressus cashmeriana". Retrieved 13 July 2013. 
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!