Overview

Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Range Description

This species occurs in five provinces in Canada and thirty four states in the United States of America.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species prefers a wide variety of streams and rivers, less commonly on lakes. Like other top predators (cougars, wolves, great horned owls), they appear to be able to utilize all habitats. This may be because the larva is not a burrower (it rests among detritus), therefore not tied to any particular substrate.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Hagenius brevistylus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 5
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2009

Assessor/s
Paulson, D. R.

Reviewer/s
Clausnitzer, V. & Kalkman, V. (Odonata Red List Authority)

Contributor/s

Justification
H. brevistylus is widespread and common throughout its range and there is no indication of any population decline.
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Population

Population
H. brevistylus is common and widespread.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no threats presently affecting this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
H. brevistylus is present in many federal, state, local, and private reserves; it appears not to require further conservation measures at this time.
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Wikipedia

Dragonhunter

closeup of head

The Dragonhunter or Black Clubtail (Hagenius brevistylus), sometimes called the Black Dragon, is a clubtail dragonfly of the eastern United States and southeastern Canada.

It is much larger than any other North American clubtail, at 3.3 inches (84 mm), with black and yellow markings and green eyes. Males can be distinguished at a distance by their habit of curling their abdomens under while flying, forming a sideways J shape.[1][2]

The Dragonhunter is the only member of genus Hagenius. Its closest relatives are Asian dragonflies of genus Sieboldius. Together the two genera form the subfamily Hageniinae.

The nymph is unusual, with a very flat, wide body. It is slow-moving and lives among bark and leaf litter at the edges of streams, where its dark color provides camouflage.[3]

The adult feeds on large insects, including darner and clubtail dragonflies, sometimes ambushing them from above.[3][4] It also takes Monarch butterflies, eating the thorax and abdomen first to avoid the greatest concentration of cardenolide toxins.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kurt Mead. Dragonflies of the North Woods. Second edition. Duluth, MN:Kollath+Stensaas, 2009.
  2. ^ Dunkle, Sidney W. (2000). Dragonflies through Binoculars. New York: Oxford University Press. p. 176. ISBN 0-19-511268-7. 
  3. ^ a b Needham, James G.; Minter J. Westfall, Jr. and Michael L. May (2000). Dragonflies of North America (rev. ed.). Gainesville, FL: Scientific Publishers. pp. 348–351. ISBN 0-945417-94-2. 
  4. ^ Corbet, Phillip S. (1999). Dragonflies: Behavior and Ecology of Odonata. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. pp. 281–282. ISBN 0-8014-2592-1. 
  5. ^ White, DS; Sexton, OJ (1989). "The Monarch Butterfly (Lepidoptera: Danaidae) as Prey for the Dragonfly Hagenius brevistylus (Odonata: Gomphidae) [abstract]". Entomological News 100 (3): 129–132. Retrieved 2007-07-17. 
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