The following bibliography has been generated by bringing together all references provided by our content partners. There may be duplication.

References

  • Bean, W.J. 1980. Trees and shrubs hardy in the British Isles, ed. 8, Vols. 1-4. John Murray, London
  • Farjon A. (2013). Conifer Database (version Jul 2011). In: Species 2000 & ITIS Catalogue of Life, 11th March 2013 (Roskov Y., Kunze T., Paglinawan L., Orrell T., Nicolson D., Culham A., Bailly N., Kirk P., Bourgoin T., Baillargeon G., Hernandez F., De Wever A., eds). Digital resource at www.catalogueoflife.org/col/. Species 2000: Reading, UK.
  • Fernald, M. 1950. Manual (ed. 8) i–lxiv, 1–1632. American Book Co., New York.
  • Mill. 1768. In: Gard. Dict., ed. 8: Pinus No. 9.
  • Radford, A. E., H. E. Ahles & C. R. Bell. 1968. Man. Vasc. Fl. Carolinas i–lxi, 1–1183. University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill.
  • Small, J. K. 1933. Man. S.E. Fl. i–xxii, 1–1554. Published by the Author, New York.
  • The Gardeners Dictionary: . . . eighth edition no. 9. 1768. (Gard. Dict. (ed. 8))
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    1. Barden, L. S. 1976. Pine reproduction in the Thompson River  Watershed, North Carolina. Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific  Society 92:110-113.
    2.  
    3. Barrows-Broaddus, J., and L. D. Dwinell. 1984. Variation in  susceptibility to the pitch canker fungus among half-sib and full-sib  families of Virginia pine. Phytopathology 74:438-444.
    4.  
    5. Belanger, R. P., and D. L. Bramlett. 1973. Pollen production on  18-month-old Virginia pine seedlings. USDA Forest Service, Research Note  SE-195. Southeastern Forest Experiment Station, Asheville, NC. 3 p. 
    6.  
    7. Belanger, R. P., and D. L. Bramlett. 1975. Virginia pine as a  Christmas tree. USDA Forest Service, Research Note SE-223. Southeastern  Forest Experiment Station, Asheville, NC. 4 p.
    8.  
    9. Belanger, R. P., and D. L. Bramlett. 1979. The growth and yield of  Virginia pine. p. 108-118 In Proceedings, Symposium for the Management  of Pines of the Interior South. USDA Forest Service, Technical Bulletin  SA-TP2. Southeast Area, State and Private Forestry, Atlanta, GA.
    10.  
    11. Belanger, R. P., D. L. Bramlett, and E. L. Moyer, Jr. 1973. Time  schedule of Virginia pine plantations advanced. Tree Planters'Notes  24(2):8-9.
    12.  
    13. Bramlett, D. L. 1971. Correlations between reproductive and  vegetative growth in a 6-year-old Virginia pine plantation. USDA Forest  Service, Research Paper SE-88. Southeastern Forest Experiment Station,  Asheville, NC. 6 p.
    14.  
    15. Bramlett, D. L., and E. L. Moyer, Jr. 1973. Seed losses reduced in  Virginia pine cones by screen wire cages. USDA Forest Service, Research  Note SE-193. Southeastern Forest Experiment Station, Asheville, NC. 4 p. 
    16.  
    17. Bramlett, D. L., and R. P. Belanger. 1976. Fertilizer and phenotypic  selection increase growth and flowering of young Virginia pine. Forest  Science 22:461-467.
    18.  
    19. Brown, C. L., and H. E. Sommer. 1977. Bud and root differentiation in  conifer cultures. Tappi 60(6):72-73.
    20.  
    21. Carvell, K. L. 1966. The effect of stand density on the development  of Virginia pine in the Ohio River area of West Virginia. West Virginia  University Agriculture Experiment Station, Current Report 46.  Morgantown. 13 p.
    22.  
    23. Clark, A., III, and H. E. Wahlgren. 1970. Wood density surveys of the  minor species of yellow pine in the eastern United States. Part V:  Virginia pine (Pinus uirginiana Mill.). USDA Forest Service,  Research Paper SE-64. Southeastern Forest Experiment Station, Asheville,  NC. 11 p.
    24.  
    25. Conner, R. H., R. G. Hooper, H. S. Crawford, and H. S. Mosby. 1975.  Woodpecker nesting habitat in cut and uncut woodlands in Virginia.  Journal of Wildlife Management 39:144-150.
    26.  
    27. Davis, D. D., and F. A. Wood. 1972. The relative susceptibility of  eighteen coniferous species to ozone. Phytopathology 62:14-19.
    28.  
    29. Dwinell, L. D. 1978. Susceptibility of southern pines to infection by  Fusarium moniliforme var. subglutinans. Plant Disease  Reporter 62:108-111.
    30.  
    31. Ebel, Bernard E., Thomas H. Flannell, Lloyd E. Drake, and others.  1975. Seed and cone insects of southern pines. USDA Forest Service,  General Technical Report SE-8. Southeastern Forest Experiment Station,  Asheville, NC. 40 p.
    32.  
    33. Eyre, F. H., ed. 1980. Forest cover types of the United States and  Canada. Society of American Foresters, Washington, DC. 148 p.
    34.  
    35. Fenton, R. H., and A. R. Bond. 1964. The silvics and silviculture of  Virginia pine in southern Maryland. USDA Forest Service, Research Paper  NE-27. Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, Broomall, PA. 37 p.
    36.  
    37. Fenton, R. H., and A. R. Bond. 1965. Pre-commercial thinning not  recommended for Virginia pine stands in southern Maryland. USDA Forest  Service, Research Note NE-40. Northeastern Forest Experiment Station,  Broomall, PA. 7 p.
    38.  
    39. Genys, John B. 1966. Geographic variation in Virginia pine. Silvae  Genetica 15:72-75.
    40.  
    41. Genys, John B., Jonathan W. Wright, and Donovan C. Forbes. 1974.  Intraspecific variation in Virginia pine: results of a provenance trial  in Maryland, Michigan, and Tennessee. Silvae Genetica 23:99-104.
    42.  
    43. Henninger, C. M. 1962. Site index of two pines on the Cumberland  Plateau in Tennessee. Journal of Soil and Water Conservation 17:175-176. 
    44.  
    45. Hepting, George H. 1971. Diseases of forest and shade trees of the  United States. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Handbook 386.  Washington, DC. 658 p.
    46.  
    47. Hu, S. C., and C. W. Brewer. 1978. Shearing is a necessary cultural  practice for Virginia pine Christmas tree production. Southern Journal  of Applied Forestry 2:135-136.
    48.  
    49. Kellison, R. C., and B. J. Zobel. 1974. Genetics of Virginia pine.  USDA Forest Service, Research Paper WO-21. Washington, DC. 10 p.
    50.  
    51. Loftus, N. S., Jr. 1974. Performance of pine and yellowpoplar planted  on low-quality sites in central Tennessee. USDA Forest Service, Research  Note SO-176. Southern Forest Experiment Station, New Orleans, LA. 5 p. 
    52.  
    53. McMinn, J. W., and W. H. Crane. 1984. Five-year performance of  selected woody species on an upper coastal plain spoil bank. Southern  Journal of Applied Forestry 8:207-209.
    54.  
    55. Meier, Richard J., and James F. Goggans. 1977. Heritabilities of  height, diameter and specific gravity of young Virginia pine. Forest  Science 23:450-456.
    56.  
    57. Meier, Richard J., and James F. Goggans. 1978. Heritabilities and  correlations of the cortical monoterpenes of Virginia pine (Pinus  uirginiana Mill.). Silvae Genetica 27:79-84.
    58.  
    59. Metz, Louis J., Carol G. Wells, and Paul P. Kormanik. 1970. Comparing  the forest floor and surface soil beneath four pine species in the  Virginia Piedmont. USDA Forest Service, Research Paper SE-55.  Southeastern Forest Experiment Station, Asheville, NC. 8 p.
    60.  
    61. Nelson, T. C., J. L. Clutter, and L. E. Chaiken. 1961. Yield of  Virginia pine. USDA Forest Service, Station Paper 124. Southeastern  Forest Experiment Station, Asheville, NC. 11 p.
    62.  
    63. Osterhaus, C. A., and C. W. Lantz. 1978. Pine plantations on the  Cross Timbers area of Oklahoma. Southern Journal of Applied Forestry  2:90-93.
    64.  
    65. Phillips, S. 0., and J. M. Skelly. 1975. Terminal elongation of  several forest tree species as affected by air pollution. p. 154. In  Sixty-sixth Annual Meeting Abstracts, Proceedings of the American  Phytopathological Society, Vancouver, B. C., August 1974. St. Paul, MN. 
    66.  
    67. Rink, G., and E. Thor. 1976. Variance components and gains in volume  growth of Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana Mill.). Silvae  Genetica 25:17-22.
    68.  
    69. Schopmeyer, C. S., tech. coord. 1974. Seeds of woody plants in the  United States. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Handbook 450.  Washington, DC. 883 p.
    70.  
    71. Slocum, G. K., and W. D. Miller. 1953. Virginia pine. North Carolina  Agricultural Experiment Station, Technical Bulletin 100. Raleigh. 52 p. 
    72.  
    73. Smalley, G. W. 1985. Growth of 20-year-old Virginia pine planted at  three spacings in Tennessee. Southern Journal of Applied Forestry  9:32-37.
    74.  
    75. Smalley, G. W., and K. Pierce. 1972. Yellow-poplar, loblolly pine,  and Virginia pine compared in Cumberland Plateau plantations. USDA  Forest Service, Research Note SO-141. Southern Forest Experiment  Station, New Orleans, LA. 6 p.
    76.  
    77. Snow, Albert G., Jr. 1965. Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana Mill.).  In Silvics of forest trees of the United States. p. 471-477. H.  A. Fowells, comp. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Handbook  271. Washington, DC.
    78.  
    79. Snow, Albert G., Jr., and Curtis May. 1962. Rooting of Virginia pine  cuttings. Journal of Forestry 60:257-258.
    80.  
    81. Sucoff, Edward 1. 1961. Effect of seedbed conditions on regeneration  of Virginia pine after logging. USDA Forest Service, Station Paper 147.  Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, Broomall, PA. 10 p.
    82.  
    83. Thor, E. 1964. Variation in Virginia pine, Part 1: Natural variation  in wood properties. Journal of Forestry 62:258-262.
    84.  
    85. Williamson, R. K. 1978. Followup, on trees. Soil Conservation  43(10):9.
    86.  
     

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