Overview

Distribution

endemic to a single state or province

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Range: Hoffmann and Smith (in Wilson and Reeder 2005) stated that the range is restricted to the Manzano Mountains, New Mexico. However, according to Frey (2004), the range includes a larger extent of montane habitat in central New Mexico, encompassing Mount Taylor, Datil, Magdalena, San Mateo, Manzano, Captian, and Sacramento mountains), as well as some nonmontane areas at the northeastern edge of the range (Conchas River and Mesa de la Yegua in central San Miguel County) (e.g., Bailey 1931, Hall 1981). Cottontails on the Mogollon Plateau in southern Catron County, assigned to S. floridanus by Findley et al. (1975), may be S. cognatus or S. nuttallii (Frey 2004).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Range Description

Sylvilagus cognatus occurs in the Manzano Mountains of New Mexico, USA (Hall 1981). It is known from the type locality within the vicinity of Rea Ranch, New Mexico, on the “northeast side of Bosque Peak, at 2,880 m” elevation (Frey et al. 1997). There are records of a specimen found in 1956 on the eastern slope of the Sandia Mountains, at 8,500 ft, and another was possibly sighted at 11,650 ft near Sandia Crest (Ivey 1957) but it is unclear whether the Sandia Mountains are included in its current distribution.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Type Information

Type for Sylvilagus cognatus Nelson, 1907
Catalog Number: USNM 136569
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Mammals
Sex/Stage: Unknown; Adult
Preparation: Skin; Skull
Collector(s): A. Rea
Year Collected: 1905
Locality: Tajique, near summit of Manzano Mountains [= vicinity of Rea Ranch, 1.9 km N and 13.4 km W of Tajique, T6N, R5E, NE 1/4 of NW 1/4 Sec. 9, NE side of Bosque Peak (see Frey et al 1997:331)], Torrance County, New Mexico, United States, North America
Elevation (m): 2880
  • Type: Nelson, E. W. 1907 Jul 22. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington. 20: 82.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Mammals

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat Type: Terrestrial

Comments: Habitats include primarily montane areas but may include some lowland habitats as well (Frey 2004).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Sylvilagus cognatus occurs in a high elevation area where conifer forest dominates. It is unknown what type of cover S. cognatus requires. It is assumed that habitat requirements and ecology are similar to S. floridanus.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 6 - 20

Comments: Based on information in Frey (2004), this cottontail occurs in several distinct mountain ranges, each of which may encompass multiple occurrences (subpopulations).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G2 - Imperiled

Reasons: The range encompasses central New Mexico; status is uncertain due to inconsistencies in range descriptions (one mountain range versus several).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
DD
Data Deficient

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Smith, A.T. & Boyer, A. F.

Reviewer/s
Johnston, C.H. and Smith, A.T. (Lagomorph Red List Authority)

Contributor/s

Justification
Very little is known about the status, range, and threats to Sylvilagus cognatus. Due to its restricted range, it is likely to be threatened, but the status is not currently known. More research is needed before an informed assessment can be made.

History
  • 1996
    Not Evaluated
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Short Term Trend: Unknown

Comments: Current trend is unknown.

Global Long Term Trend: Increase of 10-25% to decline of 30%

Comments: Extent of occurrence, area of occupancy, or number of subpopulations apparently have not changed compared to the historical situation.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
There is no information available about the population status of Sylvilagus cognatus.

Population Trend
Unknown
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Comments: According to Hoffman and Smith (in Wilson and Reeder 2005), this species is "likely endangered." However, this is based on the belief that the range is confined to the Manzano Mountains (compare Frey 2004).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Major Threats
The threats to Sylvilagus cognatus are not known, but the New Mexico Drought Task Force indicates that the species may be affected by loss of habitat, drought, and wildfire (New Mexico Drought Task Force 2005). The degree of threat is not known.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
As a recently split and relatively unstudied species, there are currently no conservation measures in place for Sylvilagus cognatus. Research is needed to determine the population status, threats, and habitat requirements for this species before recommendations can be made.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Manzano mountain cottontail

The Manzano mountain cottontail (Sylvilagus cognatus) is a species of cottontail rabbit endemic to the Manzano Mountains in New Mexico, USA.[1] It occurs in coniferous forests in high elevation. It was previously thought to be a subspecies of the Eastern cottontail.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Smith, A.T. & Boyer, A. F. (2008). "Sylvilagus cognatus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2009.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 2010-01-29. 
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Sylvilagus cognatus formerly was included in S. floridanus. Based on information presented by Ruedas (1998), Frey (2004) and Hoffman and Smith (in Wilson and Reeder 2005) recognized S. cognatus as a distinct species.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!