Overview

Brief Summary

Overview

The striped burrowing frog (Cyclorana alboguttata) is a species of burrowing frog in the Hylidae family. It occurs throughout much of Australia, from northern New South Wales, through eastern and northern Queensland and into eastern Northern Territory. This species was once included in the genus Litoria.
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Distribution

Range Description

This Australian endemic occurs from the northeastern corner of the Northern Territory, throughout coastal and sub-coastal Queensland and into New South Wales.
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Distribution and Habitat

Occurs from the north-eastern corner of the Northern Territory, throughout the Queensland coast and into New South Wales.The extent of occurrence of the species is approximately 773000 km2.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Predavec, M. and Dickman, C.R. (1993). ''Ecology of desert frogs: a study from southwestern Queensland.'' Herpetology in Australia,
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is found in temporarily inundated grasslands and open forest in semi-arid and drier/seasonally wet coastal areas. They are generally associated with clay soils. Activity has a positive correlation with rainfall and the availability of freestanding water. In drier times they spend most of their time buried underground close to temporary ponds (in aestivation). An opportunistic breeder, it lays its eggs in temporary pools when there is sufficient rainfall. Tadpoles develop quickly to avoid desiccation. Roadside reserves provide significant habitat in areas heavily impacted by agro-industry farming.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Jean-Marc Hero, John Clarke, Ed Meyer, Richard Retallick, Paul Horner

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

History
  • 2002
    Least Concern
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Population

Population
More information is needed.

Population Trend
Stable
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Temporarily inundated grasslands and open forest. Activity has a positive correlation with rainfall and the availability of free-standing water. In drier times they spend most time buried underground close to temporary ponds.Breeding biology largely unknown, but thought to be an opportunistic breeder laying eggs in temporary pools when there is sufficient rainfall. Tadpoles develop quickly to avoid dessiccation.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Predavec, M. and Dickman, C.R. (1993). ''Ecology of desert frogs: a study from southwestern Queensland.'' Herpetology in Australia,
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Threats

Major Threats
One major threat is agricultural expansion (sugar cane and cotton farming in particular) resulting in extensive habitat loss and degradation. Land pollution associated with the widespread use of agrochemicals might also adversely affect this species.
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

No known declines and a large extent of occurrence.

Threats
Expanding development along the east coast may be a threat causing habitat loss and degradation.

Conservation Measures
None in place.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Predavec, M. and Dickman, C.R. (1993). ''Ecology of desert frogs: a study from southwestern Queensland.'' Herpetology in Australia,
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It occurs within a few conservation parks and reserves.
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Wikipedia

Striped burrowing frog

The striped burrowing frog (Cyclorana alboguttata) is a species of burrowing frog in the Hylidae family. It occurs throughout much of Australia, from northern New South Wales, through eastern and northern Queensland and into eastern Northern Territory. This species was once included in the genus Litoria.

Physical description[edit]

This female of this species grows up to 85 millimetres (3.3 in) in length and the male can reach an adult length of 70 millimetres (2.8 in).[1] It is brown, olive or green dorsally, with darker blotches. There is usually a pale yellow or yellow-green stripe down the back, and a dark streak runs from the snout, through the eye and the tympanum, breaking up down the flanks. This stripe has lateral skin fold above it. The backs of the thighs are dark, almost black, with large white, with some flecks brown on the throat and chest. The skin of the back has scattered warts and ridges. The belly is granular, but the throat and chest are smooth. The toes are half webbed. The tympanum is distinct.

Ecology and behaviour[edit]

C. alboguttata lives in woodlands, grassy and cleared areas. It is usually only seen around temporary pools and water-filled claypans. The species is active by day and night. This frog is known to go through a period of torpor when resources are scant. University of Queensland researchers have discovered that their cell metabolism changes during a dormancy period, allowing the frogs to maximize the use of their limited energy resources without depleting them completely.[2] This discovery could prove to have important medical applications, particularly regarding obesity.

Reproduction[edit]

Males call from around the grassy edges of temporary pools and ditches. They are often heard by day, and usually seen only after heavy summer rain. The call is a rapid "quacking" made from the ground or shallow water and eggs are laid in clumps near the waters edge.

See also[edit]

This species may be confused with Cyclorana australis but can be distinguished by the lateral skin folds on either side of the dorsal surface.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wildlife of Greater Brisbane. Brisbane: Queensland Museum. 2007. p. 221. ISBN 978-0-9775943-1-3. 
  2. ^ Society for Experimental Biology (2009, June 29). C. alboguttata has been noted to secrete highly acidic mucus as defence mechanism often causing terminal injury to predator. Obesity Clues From Research On How Burrowing Frogs Survive Years Without Food. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 1, 2009, from http://www.sciencedaily.com /releases/2009/06/090629081133.htm
  • Frogs Australia Network - call available here
  • Anstis, M. 2002. Tadpoles of South-eastern Australia. Reed New Holland: Sydney.
  • Barker, J.; Grigg, G.C.; Tyler,M.J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty & Sons.
  • Robinson, M. 2002. A Field Guide to Frogs of Australia. Australian Museum/Reed New Holland: Sydney.
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