Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is found in the southwest region of Western Australia, from Port Gregory south and east to Bremer Bay and from Esperance to Mount Ragged. The estimated altitudinal range of the species is from 0-600m asl.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution and Habitat

Found in the Southwest region of Western Australia. From Port Gregory south and east to Bremer Bay and from Esperance to Mt Ragged.The extent of occurrence of the species is approximately 209100 km2.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Tyler, M.J., Smith, L.A., and Johnstone, R.E. (1994). Frogs of Western Australia. Western Australian Museum, Perth.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© AmphibiaWeb © 2000-2011 The Regents of the University of California

Source: AmphibiaWeb

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is found in permanent swamps and lagoons. Frogs are usually found on the ground or among emergent vegetation at the water’s edge of static or slow-flowing water. Breeding occurs in spring, and males call from the water or adjacent soil and vegetation. Spawn is laid in a loose mass attached to submerged vegetation at the surface of the water.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Jean-Marc Hero, Dale Roberts

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern because of its wide distribution, presumed large population, and because its population is not believed to be in decline at present.

History
  • 2002
    Least Concern
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
It is a common species.

Population Trend
Stable
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Found in permanent swamps and lagoons. Frogs are usually found on the ground or among emergent vegetation at the water's edge. Static or slow-flowing water.Breeding occurs in spring. Males call from the water or adjacent soil and vegetation. Spawn is laid in a loose mass attached to submerged vegetation at the surface of the water.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Tyler, M.J., Smith, L.A., and Johnstone, R.E. (1994). Frogs of Western Australia. Western Australian Museum, Perth.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© AmphibiaWeb © 2000-2011 The Regents of the University of California

Source: AmphibiaWeb

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
There are no known threats to this species' habitat at present. Chytrid fungus was detected in this species at Lake Gwelup and Perth in Western Australia.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

No known declines and extent of occurrence > 20,000km2.

Threats
None known.

Conservation Measures
None in place.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Tyler, M.J., Smith, L.A., and Johnstone, R.E. (1994). Frogs of Western Australia. Western Australian Museum, Perth.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© AmphibiaWeb © 2000-2011 The Regents of the University of California

Source: AmphibiaWeb

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There is a big conservation estate covering most of the range of the species. It has been bred in captivity in Perth Zoo in 2004.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Slender tree frog

The slender tree frog (Litoria adelaidensis) is a tree frog native to southwestern Australia.

Physical description[edit]

As suggested by its name, the slender tree frog has a very slender build. It has a thin, flat body with a flat, pointed snout. The dorsal surface varies in colour, from completely brown or green, to brown with green patches. The flanks of the body have a dark brown or black stripe, which runs from the back leg to the nostril; the line is much narrower between the nostril and the eye. The ventral surface is white, and the inside of the thighs have bright red spots. The tympanum is large and distinct. The fingers are mostly unwebbed and the toes are three-quarter webbed. They reach a length of 4.7 centimetres (1.9 in) from snout to vent.

Ecology and behaviour[edit]

Males call near a still water source to attract females; the call is a harsh "screech". Breeding occurs in early spring. The slender tree frog is found in permanent swamps and lagoons, often at the water's edge amongst the vegetation.

References[edit]

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!