Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Very similar to the Common Tree Frog (Hyla arborea), but differs from it by usually having a dark spot on the upper lip below the eye, lack of an inguinal loop, and slightly shorter hind legs (when the hind leg is stretched along the body, the tibio-tarsal articulation commonly reaches the posterior edge of the eye). Tympanic membrane smaller than eye. Dorsal skin smooth, ventral skin granular. Coloration and sexual dimorphism are similar to those in the Common Tree Frog (the main difference is the absence of the inguinal loop). Dark lateral band regularly disrupted into spots and partially reduced. The tips of fingers and toes have round adhesive discs. The forelimb webbing is poorly developed. The mean snout-vent length for males is 31 mm (range 26-45 mm) and for females is 35 mm (range 26-41 mm). The nuptial pads in males are yellow.

Karotype: Diploid chromosome (2n) with 6 large pairs and 6 small ones making a total of 24 chromosomes.

  • Bannikov, A. G., Darevsky, I. S. and Rustamov, A. K. (1971). Zemnovodnye i Presmykayushchienya SSSR [Amphibians and Reptiles of the USSR]. Izdatelistvo Misl, Moscow.
  • Bannikov, A. G., Darevsky, I. S., Ishchenko, V. G., Rustamov, A. K., and Szczerbak, N. N. (1977). Opredelitel Zemnovodnykh i Presmykayushchikhsya Fauny SSSR [Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of the USSR Fauna]. Prosveshchenie, Moscow.
  • Fei, L. (1999). Atlas of Amphibians of China. Henan Publishing House of Science and Technology, Zhengzhou.
  • Kuzmin, S. L. (1995). Die Amphibien Russlands und angrenzender Gebiete. Westarp Wissenschaften, Magdeburg.
  • Kuzmin, S. L. (1999). The Amphibians of the Former Soviet Union. Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.
  • Maeda, N. and Matsui, M. (1990). Frogs and Toads of Japan, 2nd edition. Bun-Ichi Sogo Shuppan Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan.
  • Nikolsky, A. M (1936). Fauna of Russia and Adjacent Countries: Amphibians (English translation of Nikolsky, 1918, Faune de la Russie et des Pays limitrophes. Amphibiens. Académie Russe des Sciences, Petrograd, USSR). Israel Program for Scientific Translations, Jerusalem.
  • Stejneger, L. H. (1907). Herpetology of Japan and Adjacent Territory, United States National Museum Bulletin 58. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C..
  • Terent'ev, P. V. and Chernov, S. A (1965). Key to Amphibians and Reptiles [of the USSR]. Israel Program for Scientific Translations, Jerusalem.
  • Vorobyeva, E. I. and Darevsky, I. S. (eds.) (1988). Amphibians and Reptiles of Mongolian People's Republic: General Problems. Amphibians.. Moscow.
  • Won, H.-K. (1971). Choson Ryangso Pyachyungryuchji [Amphibian and Reptilian Fauna of Korea]. Korean Academy of Sciences, Pyongyang.
  • Ye, C., Fei, L., and Hu, S. Q. (1993). Rare and Economic Amphibians of China. Sichuan Publishing House of Science and Technology, Chengdu.
  • Zhao, E. and Adler, K. (1993). Herpetology of China. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, Oxford, Ohio.
  • Zhao, E. and Zhao, H. (1994). Chinese Herpetological Literature: Catalogue and Indices. Chengdu University of Science and Technology, Chengdu.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© AmphibiaWeb © 2000-2011 The Regents of the University of California

Source: AmphibiaWeb

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

Range Description

This species is widespread in Japan (Hokkaido, Honshu, Shikoku, Kyushu and other small islands), central, northern and northeastern China, it is found throughout both the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and the Republic of Korea, present in northern Mongolia and the southern Russian Far East.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution and Habitat

The species is widespread in Japan, Korea, China (Fujian, Hunan, Jiangxi, Zhejiang, Jiangsu, Anhui, Hubei, Guizhou, Sichuan, Shaanxi, Henan, Hebei, Liaoning, Jilin and Heilongjiang provinces, as well as Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region), Northern Mongolia, the Russian Far East (the valleys of the Amur and Ussuri Rivers and their tributaries) and south to Lake Baikal (northernmost record, in a warm hollow of the Barguzin River valley: ca. 54º30'N, 110ºE). The species inhabits mixed and deciduous broad-leafed forests, bushlands, forest steppes, meadows and swamps. In forestless areas, the tree frog primarily inhabits river valleys with shrubs. It also occurs in settlements, even in several large cities. Spawning occurs in stagnant ponds, puddles, oxbow lakes, flooded quarries and lakes with dense herbaceous vegetation. The eggs are sometimes deposited in river and stream pools.

  • Bannikov, A. G., Darevsky, I. S. and Rustamov, A. K. (1971). Zemnovodnye i Presmykayushchienya SSSR [Amphibians and Reptiles of the USSR]. Izdatelistvo Misl, Moscow.
  • Bannikov, A. G., Darevsky, I. S., Ishchenko, V. G., Rustamov, A. K., and Szczerbak, N. N. (1977). Opredelitel Zemnovodnykh i Presmykayushchikhsya Fauny SSSR [Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of the USSR Fauna]. Prosveshchenie, Moscow.
  • Fei, L. (1999). Atlas of Amphibians of China. Henan Publishing House of Science and Technology, Zhengzhou.
  • Kuzmin, S. L. (1995). Die Amphibien Russlands und angrenzender Gebiete. Westarp Wissenschaften, Magdeburg.
  • Kuzmin, S. L. (1999). The Amphibians of the Former Soviet Union. Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.
  • Maeda, N. and Matsui, M. (1990). Frogs and Toads of Japan, 2nd edition. Bun-Ichi Sogo Shuppan Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan.
  • Nikolsky, A. M (1936). Fauna of Russia and Adjacent Countries: Amphibians (English translation of Nikolsky, 1918, Faune de la Russie et des Pays limitrophes. Amphibiens. Académie Russe des Sciences, Petrograd, USSR). Israel Program for Scientific Translations, Jerusalem.
  • Stejneger, L. H. (1907). Herpetology of Japan and Adjacent Territory, United States National Museum Bulletin 58. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C..
  • Terent'ev, P. V. and Chernov, S. A (1965). Key to Amphibians and Reptiles [of the USSR]. Israel Program for Scientific Translations, Jerusalem.
  • Vorobyeva, E. I. and Darevsky, I. S. (eds.) (1988). Amphibians and Reptiles of Mongolian People's Republic: General Problems. Amphibians.. Moscow.
  • Won, H.-K. (1971). Choson Ryangso Pyachyungryuchji [Amphibian and Reptilian Fauna of Korea]. Korean Academy of Sciences, Pyongyang.
  • Ye, C., Fei, L., and Hu, S. Q. (1993). Rare and Economic Amphibians of China. Sichuan Publishing House of Science and Technology, Chengdu.
  • Zhao, E. and Adler, K. (1993). Herpetology of China. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, Oxford, Ohio.
  • Zhao, E. and Zhao, H. (1994). Chinese Herpetological Literature: Catalogue and Indices. Chengdu University of Science and Technology, Chengdu.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© AmphibiaWeb © 2000-2011 The Regents of the University of California

Source: AmphibiaWeb

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species inhabits mixed and deciduous broadleaved forests, forest steppes, bush lands, meadows, swamps, paddy fields, ponds, and the surrounding vegetation. It is often found along the banks of rivers, streams, and lakes. Spawning and larval development takes place in stagnant ponds, puddles, oxbow lakes, flooded quarries, and lakes with dense herbaceous vegetation. The eggs are sometimes deposited in river and stream pools. The species tolerates some degree of habitat modification, and may even be found in large cities.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Male advertisement calls are a train of pulses. Geographic variation in the advertisement calls of males in Korea reflects geographic barriers and population genetic structure but does not appear to be related to habitat differences or sympatry with a related species (though larger samples are needed).  Males from higher altitudes on the southern island of Jeju are larger than those on the mainland and their calls have a lower dominant frequency. (Jang et al. 2011)

  • Jang, Y., Hahm, E. H., Lee, H.-J., Park, S., Won, Y.-J., & Choe, J. C. (2011). Geographic variation in advertisement calls in a tree frog species: gene flow and selection hypotheses. (M. Perc, Ed.)PloS one, 6(8), e23297. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0023297
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Cyndy Parr

Supplier: Cyndy Parr

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life Expectancy

Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

Maximum longevity: 8.9 years (captivity)
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Joao Pedro de Magalhaes

Source: AnAge

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Evolution and Systematics

Functional Adaptations

Functional adaptation

Skin regulates water absorption: tree frog
 

Ventral pelvic skin of tree frogs regulates water absorption using two types of water-channel aquaporins.

   
  "The ventral pelvic skin of the tree frog Hyla japonica expresses  two kinds of arginine vasotocin (AVT)-stimulated aquaporins (AQP-h2  and AQP-h3), which affect the capacity of the frog's skin to  absorb water. As such, it can be used as a model system for  analyzing the molecular mechanisms of water permeability…" (Ogushi et al. 2010:288)
  Learn more about this functional adaptation.
  • Hasegawa T; Tanii H; Suzuki M; Tanaka S. 2003. Regulation of water absorption in the frog skins by two vasotocin-dependent water-channel aquaporins, AQP-h2 and AQP-h3. Endocrinology. 144(9): 4087-4096.
  • Ogushi Y; Kitagawa D; Hasegawa T; Suzuki M; Tanaka S. 2010. Correlation between aquaporin and water permeability in response to vasotocin, hydrin and β-adrenergic effectors in the ventral pelvic skin of the tree frog Hyla japonica. Journal of Experimental Biology. 213: 288-294.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© The Biomimicry Institute

Source: AskNature

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Hyla ussuriensis

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Hyla ussuriensis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Hyla japonica Guenter

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 4
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Barcode data: Hyla japonica

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 2 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

ACCCGTTGATTATTTTCCACCAATCATAAAGATATTGGTACTCTATACCTTGTATTCGGGGCCTGAGCCGGAATAGTTGGCACCGCCCTA---AGTCTCCTAATTCGAGCAGAACTCAGCCAACCAGGATCCCTCTTAGGCGAT---GACCAGATCTACAATGTTATTGTAACAGCCCATGCCTTTGTAATAATTTTTTTTATAGTAATGCCCATCCTAATTGGGGGGTTTGGCAACTGACTAGTCCCTCTAATA---ATTGGGGCGCCCGATATAGCTTTCCCACGTATAAACAATATAAGCTTTTGACTTCTTCCTCCATCTTTTCTTCTTCTTTTAGCATCTGCCGGAGTCGAAGCAGGAGCTGGGACAGGGTGGACTGTTTACCCCCCGCTTGCCGGGAATTTAGCCCACGCCGGACCATCTGTTGACTTA---ACCATCTTTTCTCTTCATTTAGCAGGGGTTTCTTCAATTTTAGGTGCCATTAATTTCATCACCACAATTCTTAATATAAAACCCCCATCAATAACACAATATCAAACACCACTATTTGTATGATCAGTTCTTATTACTGCCGTGCTACTACTCCTATCTCTTCCGGTCTTAGCAGCA---GGAATTACTATATTACTTACTGATCGAAACCTAAACACAACATTCTTTGACCCGGCGGGAGGGGGAGACCCAGTCTTATACCAACACCTATTTTGATTTTTCGGACACCCAGAGGTTTACATTCTTATCCTCCCAGGATTTGGTATTATCTCTCACGTAGTAACGTTCTATTCAAGCAAAAAA---GAACCCTTTGGTTACATAGGAATAGTGTGAGCTATAATATCTATCGGACTTCTAGGATTCATTGTTTGAGCCCATCACATATTTACTACAGACCTAAACGTAGATACCCGAGCCTACTTCACTTCCGCTACTATAATTATTGCCATCCCAACAGGGGTTAAGGTATTTAGCTGACTA---GCCACT
-- end --

Download FASTA File

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Hyla japonica

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 8
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Sergius Kuzmin, Irina Maslova, Masafumi Matsui, Fei Liang, Yoshio Kaneko

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
This species is common throughout and is only rare and sporadically distributed in the area of Lake Baikal and Mongolia.

Population Trend
Stable
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

This tree frog is a common, sometimes abundant amphibian, except in the northern parts of its range. The overall population density probably decreases from the south to the north, e.g. from the southern to the northern part of the Amurland. Hibernation probably occurs from September-October to April - May (sometimes June) on land, with individuals taking refuge in leaf litter, rodent burrows, holes in trees, under stones, etc. Reproduction occurs later than in many other syntopic amphibians, in May - August, in relatively warm water. Males enter ponds earlier than females. They call in a similar manner to the Common Tree Frog (Hyla arborea). The mating call has notes lasting 0.1-0.2 seconds at an interval of 0.2-0.5 seconds. The fundamental frequency is 1.7 kHz, with clear harmonics. Breeding choruses occur not only at night but also during the day.

The clutch contains about 340-1500 eggs deposited singly or in a few clumps of 7-100 eggs. Females deposit their eggs both by day and night. Recently deposited spawn usually floats on the water surface. Some eggs are deposited on submerged plants. Metamorphosis occurs in summer or autumn; in some cases the tadpoles hibernate. Sexual maturity is attained probably in the 3rd-4th year of life. The majority of adults are 4-6 years old, but the maximum longevity is estimated as 6-11 years. Newly metamorphosed froglets prey upon Aphidinea and Cicadodea, whereas adult frogs feed on spiders and various insects. Active foraging occurs at twilight; during the day, frogs catch only the insects which approach them. This species feeds on spiders, Diptera, Hymenoptera, Coleoptera, and larval Lepidoptera.

  • Bannikov, A. G., Darevsky, I. S. and Rustamov, A. K. (1971). Zemnovodnye i Presmykayushchienya SSSR [Amphibians and Reptiles of the USSR]. Izdatelistvo Misl, Moscow.
  • Bannikov, A. G., Darevsky, I. S., Ishchenko, V. G., Rustamov, A. K., and Szczerbak, N. N. (1977). Opredelitel Zemnovodnykh i Presmykayushchikhsya Fauny SSSR [Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of the USSR Fauna]. Prosveshchenie, Moscow.
  • Fei, L. (1999). Atlas of Amphibians of China. Henan Publishing House of Science and Technology, Zhengzhou.
  • Kuzmin, S. L. (1995). Die Amphibien Russlands und angrenzender Gebiete. Westarp Wissenschaften, Magdeburg.
  • Kuzmin, S. L. (1999). The Amphibians of the Former Soviet Union. Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.
  • Maeda, N. and Matsui, M. (1990). Frogs and Toads of Japan, 2nd edition. Bun-Ichi Sogo Shuppan Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan.
  • Nikolsky, A. M (1936). Fauna of Russia and Adjacent Countries: Amphibians (English translation of Nikolsky, 1918, Faune de la Russie et des Pays limitrophes. Amphibiens. Académie Russe des Sciences, Petrograd, USSR). Israel Program for Scientific Translations, Jerusalem.
  • Stejneger, L. H. (1907). Herpetology of Japan and Adjacent Territory, United States National Museum Bulletin 58. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C..
  • Terent'ev, P. V. and Chernov, S. A (1965). Key to Amphibians and Reptiles [of the USSR]. Israel Program for Scientific Translations, Jerusalem.
  • Vorobyeva, E. I. and Darevsky, I. S. (eds.) (1988). Amphibians and Reptiles of Mongolian People's Republic: General Problems. Amphibians.. Moscow.
  • Won, H.-K. (1971). Choson Ryangso Pyachyungryuchji [Amphibian and Reptilian Fauna of Korea]. Korean Academy of Sciences, Pyongyang.
  • Ye, C., Fei, L., and Hu, S. Q. (1993). Rare and Economic Amphibians of China. Sichuan Publishing House of Science and Technology, Chengdu.
  • Zhao, E. and Adler, K. (1993). Herpetology of China. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, Oxford, Ohio.
  • Zhao, E. and Zhao, H. (1994). Chinese Herpetological Literature: Catalogue and Indices. Chengdu University of Science and Technology, Chengdu.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© AmphibiaWeb © 2000-2011 The Regents of the University of California

Source: AmphibiaWeb

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
The threats to this species are not well known, but are presumed to include general habitat loss, (often from changes in land use such as conversion of paddy fields to vegetable farming), pollution and prolonged drought in arid areas.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

The Japanese Tree Frog seems not to be declining throughout its range, except for some peripheral northern populations.

  • Bannikov, A. G., Darevsky, I. S. and Rustamov, A. K. (1971). Zemnovodnye i Presmykayushchienya SSSR [Amphibians and Reptiles of the USSR]. Izdatelistvo Misl, Moscow.
  • Bannikov, A. G., Darevsky, I. S., Ishchenko, V. G., Rustamov, A. K., and Szczerbak, N. N. (1977). Opredelitel Zemnovodnykh i Presmykayushchikhsya Fauny SSSR [Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of the USSR Fauna]. Prosveshchenie, Moscow.
  • Fei, L. (1999). Atlas of Amphibians of China. Henan Publishing House of Science and Technology, Zhengzhou.
  • Kuzmin, S. L. (1995). Die Amphibien Russlands und angrenzender Gebiete. Westarp Wissenschaften, Magdeburg.
  • Kuzmin, S. L. (1999). The Amphibians of the Former Soviet Union. Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.
  • Maeda, N. and Matsui, M. (1990). Frogs and Toads of Japan, 2nd edition. Bun-Ichi Sogo Shuppan Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan.
  • Nikolsky, A. M (1936). Fauna of Russia and Adjacent Countries: Amphibians (English translation of Nikolsky, 1918, Faune de la Russie et des Pays limitrophes. Amphibiens. Académie Russe des Sciences, Petrograd, USSR). Israel Program for Scientific Translations, Jerusalem.
  • Stejneger, L. H. (1907). Herpetology of Japan and Adjacent Territory, United States National Museum Bulletin 58. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C..
  • Terent'ev, P. V. and Chernov, S. A (1965). Key to Amphibians and Reptiles [of the USSR]. Israel Program for Scientific Translations, Jerusalem.
  • Vorobyeva, E. I. and Darevsky, I. S. (eds.) (1988). Amphibians and Reptiles of Mongolian People's Republic: General Problems. Amphibians.. Moscow.
  • Won, H.-K. (1971). Choson Ryangso Pyachyungryuchji [Amphibian and Reptilian Fauna of Korea]. Korean Academy of Sciences, Pyongyang.
  • Ye, C., Fei, L., and Hu, S. Q. (1993). Rare and Economic Amphibians of China. Sichuan Publishing House of Science and Technology, Chengdu.
  • Zhao, E. and Adler, K. (1993). Herpetology of China. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, Oxford, Ohio.
  • Zhao, E. and Zhao, H. (1994). Chinese Herpetological Literature: Catalogue and Indices. Chengdu University of Science and Technology, Chengdu.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© AmphibiaWeb © 2000-2011 The Regents of the University of California

Source: AmphibiaWeb

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The range of this species overlaps with many protected areas. It is listed in the Red Data Books of Buryatia and the Evreiskaya Autonomous Province of Russia.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Risks

Relation to Humans

The species often occurs in agricultural lands, in settlements and cities. However, the influence of anthropogenic factors on it remains unstudied.

  • Bannikov, A. G., Darevsky, I. S. and Rustamov, A. K. (1971). Zemnovodnye i Presmykayushchienya SSSR [Amphibians and Reptiles of the USSR]. Izdatelistvo Misl, Moscow.
  • Bannikov, A. G., Darevsky, I. S., Ishchenko, V. G., Rustamov, A. K., and Szczerbak, N. N. (1977). Opredelitel Zemnovodnykh i Presmykayushchikhsya Fauny SSSR [Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of the USSR Fauna]. Prosveshchenie, Moscow.
  • Fei, L. (1999). Atlas of Amphibians of China. Henan Publishing House of Science and Technology, Zhengzhou.
  • Kuzmin, S. L. (1995). Die Amphibien Russlands und angrenzender Gebiete. Westarp Wissenschaften, Magdeburg.
  • Kuzmin, S. L. (1999). The Amphibians of the Former Soviet Union. Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.
  • Maeda, N. and Matsui, M. (1990). Frogs and Toads of Japan, 2nd edition. Bun-Ichi Sogo Shuppan Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan.
  • Nikolsky, A. M (1936). Fauna of Russia and Adjacent Countries: Amphibians (English translation of Nikolsky, 1918, Faune de la Russie et des Pays limitrophes. Amphibiens. Académie Russe des Sciences, Petrograd, USSR). Israel Program for Scientific Translations, Jerusalem.
  • Stejneger, L. H. (1907). Herpetology of Japan and Adjacent Territory, United States National Museum Bulletin 58. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C..
  • Terent'ev, P. V. and Chernov, S. A (1965). Key to Amphibians and Reptiles [of the USSR]. Israel Program for Scientific Translations, Jerusalem.
  • Vorobyeva, E. I. and Darevsky, I. S. (eds.) (1988). Amphibians and Reptiles of Mongolian People's Republic: General Problems. Amphibians.. Moscow.
  • Won, H.-K. (1971). Choson Ryangso Pyachyungryuchji [Amphibian and Reptilian Fauna of Korea]. Korean Academy of Sciences, Pyongyang.
  • Ye, C., Fei, L., and Hu, S. Q. (1993). Rare and Economic Amphibians of China. Sichuan Publishing House of Science and Technology, Chengdu.
  • Zhao, E. and Adler, K. (1993). Herpetology of China. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, Oxford, Ohio.
  • Zhao, E. and Zhao, H. (1994). Chinese Herpetological Literature: Catalogue and Indices. Chengdu University of Science and Technology, Chengdu.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© AmphibiaWeb © 2000-2011 The Regents of the University of California

Source: AmphibiaWeb

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Japanese tree frog

The Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica) is a species of tree frog distributed from Hokkaidō to Yakushima in Japan and from Korea along the Ussuri River to northeastern China, northern Mongolia, and the southern Russian Far East.

Hyla japonica was formerly considered to be a subspecies of H. arborea (European tree frog).[1] Animals from northern China, the Korean Peninsula, eastern Russia, and Mongolia have been considered to be a separate species H. ussuriensis,[2] which would make H. japonica endemic to Japan.[1]

These tree frogs are commonly found in rice paddies, and rest during the day on rice leaves and other broad-leaved vegetation.[citation needed] During the early evening, they are active and move to lights to catch the insects attracted to the lights.

Journalist Toyohiro Akiyama carried some Japanese tree frogs with him during his trip to the Mir space station in December 1990.[citation needed] Calling behavior of the species was used to create an algorithm for optimizing Wi-Fi networks.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Sergius Kuzmin, Irina Maslova, Masafumi Matsui, Fei Liang, Yoshio Kaneko (2004). "Hyla japonica". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 3 November 2012. 
  2. ^ Fei, L. (1999). Atlas of Amphibians of China (in Chinese). Zhengzhou: Henan Press of Science and Technology. p. 142. ISBN 7-5349-1835-9. 
  3. ^ "Frog calls inspire a new algorithm for wireless networks". Sciencedaily.com. doi:10.1007/s11721-012-0067-2. Retrieved 2012-07-20. 
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!