Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is known from north and northeast China and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, the whole of Mongolia and eastern Russia (Baikal area and the Far East). Presumed to occur in Republic of Korea, but this requires verification. Altitudinal range is between 600 and 2,700m asl.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The species inhabits the edges of coniferous and deciduous forests, groves, bush lands, meadows, forest steppes, steppes with sandy, rocky and alluvial soils, semi-desert, oases in dry steppes and the Gobi Desert of Mongolia. It is abundant around and in many human settlements, some cities and in agricultural landscapes. Although B. raddei is an opportunistic species, it prefers areas with soft, sandy and alluvial soils. It breeds in stagnant waterbodies such as ditches, pools and paddy fields.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Pseudepidalea raddei

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Pseudepidalea raddei

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Bufo raddei

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 5
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Sergius Kuzmin, Masafumi Matsui, Liang Gang, Irina Maslova

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.
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Population

Population
The species is widespread and common over much of its range.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no major threats to this species. It is locally impacted by high road mortality, and might possibly be threatened by over-collecting for traditional Chinese medicine.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The range of this species includes many protected areas. It is listed in the Red Data Books of Buryatia and Irkutskaya Province (Russia).
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Wikipedia

Mongolian toad

The Mongolian toad, also known as the piebald toad or Siberian sand toad, is a species of toad found in East Asia. It ranges through much of China, Mongolia, and the Russian Far East, and is also found in the northern Korean Peninsula. According to Kuzmin et al.,[1] it is not definitely known to be present in South Korea. It is particularly common in the Amur River basin of China and Russia.

The Mongolian toad is relatively small, with adults not exceeding 9 cm in length. It ranges through a wide range of habitats is often found in dry regions, preferring sandy soil; it was first described based on specimens from the Alashan desert. The species does not occur above 2700 m, or below 600 m. The northernmost population is found on Olkhon Island in Russia's Lake Baikal.

The mating season occurs between March and July, depending on the local climate; eggs are typically laid in shallow puddles, leading to the death of many tadpoles as the puddles dry up. Mongolian toads hibernate in the ground, usually in groups, in holes up to 2 metres deep. Adult toads favour ants as food, particularly in arid regions; they also eat spiders and beetles.

The Mongolian toad was classed as Bufo raddei prior to the 2006 definition of the genus Pseudepidalea.[2] Other closely related species include the European green toad, Pseudepidale viridis.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Sergius Kuzmin, Masafumi Matsui, Liang Gang, Irina Maslova (2004). "Pseudepidalea raddei". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 3 November 2012. 
  2. ^ Frost, D. R.; Grant, T.; Faivovich, J. N.; Bain, R. H.; Haas, A.; Haddad, C. L. F. B.; De Sá, R. O.; Channing, A.; Wilkinson, M.; Donnellan, S. C.; Raxworthy, C. J.; Campbell, J. A.; Blotto, B. L.; Moler, P.; Drewes, R. C.; Nussbaum, R. A.; Lynch, J. D.; Green, D. M.; Wheeler, W. C. (2006). "The Amphibian Tree of Life". Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 297: 1. doi:10.1206/0003-0090(2006)297[0001:TATOL]2.0.CO;2. hdl:2246/5781.  edit


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