Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This Australian endemic is known from throughout the arid central region of Western Australia, most of South Australia (with the exception of the coastline) and into the far western reaches of Queensland and New South Wales. The extent of occurrence of the species is approximately 544,900km2
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Distribution and Habitat

Throughout the arid central region of Western Australia, most of South Australia (with the exception of the coastline) and into the far western reaches of Queensland and New South Wales.The extent of occurrence of the species is approximately 544900 km2

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Tyler, M.J., Smith, L.A., and Johnstone, R.E. (1994). Frogs of Western Australia. Western Australian Museum, Perth.
  • Cogger, H.G. (1992). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia. Reed Books, New South Wales.
  • Predavec, M. and Dickman, C.R. (1993). ''Ecology of desert frogs: a study from southwestern Queensland.'' Herpetology in Australia,
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species often inhabits sparse woodland and Triodia covered sand hills. It is associated with sand and clay soils. It is active just before, during and after rainfall. It breeds in flooded clay pans after summer and autumn rains. Details of spawn and tadpoles are not known. In "Habitat preferences" "other" refers to "clay pans".

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Neobatrachus centralis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Jean-Marc Hero, Dale Roberts

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, and because its population is not believed to be in decline at present.

History
  • 2002
    Least Concern
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Population

Population
The population status of this species is unknown.

Population Trend
Stable
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Often in sparse woodland and Triodia covered sandhills. Associated with sand and clay soils. Active just before, during and after rainfall.Breeds in flooded claypans after summer and autumn rains. Details of spawn and tadpoles are unknown.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Tyler, M.J., Smith, L.A., and Johnstone, R.E. (1994). Frogs of Western Australia. Western Australian Museum, Perth.
  • Cogger, H.G. (1992). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia. Reed Books, New South Wales.
  • Predavec, M. and Dickman, C.R. (1993). ''Ecology of desert frogs: a study from southwestern Queensland.'' Herpetology in Australia,
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no known threats to the species.
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

No known declines and extent of occurrence > 20,000km2.

Threats
None known.

Conservation Measures
None in place.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Tyler, M.J., Smith, L.A., and Johnstone, R.E. (1994). Frogs of Western Australia. Western Australian Museum, Perth.
  • Cogger, H.G. (1992). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia. Reed Books, New South Wales.
  • Predavec, M. and Dickman, C.R. (1993). ''Ecology of desert frogs: a study from southwestern Queensland.'' Herpetology in Australia,
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The range of the species includes a few protected areas.
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Wikipedia

Trilling frog

The Trilling Frog or Desert Trilling Frog (Neobatrachus centralis) is an Australian burrowing frog, of the family Myobatrachidae.

Distribution[edit]

The Trilling frog is found throughout the central Australian deserts in a band encompassing South Australia and Western Australia. It is remarkable in its toleration for arid environments.

Description[edit]

The Trilling Frog is a medium sized short, fat frog (5 centimetres measured from snout to posterior), usually of a brown and tan colour with sharply differentiated mottling, much like army desert camouflage. This frog is white underneath. The pupil of this frog contracts to a vertical slit. The dorsal surface is usually smooth, however it is reported that during the breeding season, the males develop fine, dark bristles on their back. The Trilling Frog can be differentiated from The Painted Frog (Neobatrachus pictus) by the 'baggy pants' of loose skin that extends almost to their knees when the hind legs are extended

Ecology and behaviour[edit]

The Trilling frog is adapted to desert conditions and can spend years without having to surface, buried deep underground with their glands under the skin full of water. The Trilling Frogs will commonly dig themselves to the surface at the beginning of the late summer rains. There are stories that to prevent death by thirst, Indigenous Australians could catch these frogs by cleverly stamping on the right patch of ground to simulate thunder or falling rain, causing the frogs would surface where they could then be made to give up their stored moisture. These frogs will spend a few weeks calling nightly while floating in or sitting at the edge of rainwater filled claypans, puddles and waterholes. DEH, Trilling Frog Call

They eat the numerous insects accompanying the rains and lay eggs in drawn out clumps, often wrapped around snags in the water. The tadpoles mature very quickly.

Like most Australian frogs, the Trilling Frog is an opportunistic predator and so the diet of the species consists mostly of any desert dwelling insects and reptiles small enough to fit in its mouth. In some areas it is the only ground living vertebrate collected.

Genetics[edit]

This interesting little frog is a tetraploid organism, having double the normal number of chromosomes. Recently results of molecular biology analysis have caused some speculation that this may be the same species as Neobatrachus sudelli (Roberts (1997))

References[edit]

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