Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species formerly occurred in the interior uplands of Puerto Rico, at an altitude of 300-1,150 m asl.
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Physical Description

Type Information

Paratype for Eleutherodactylus eneidae
Catalog Number: USNM 140248
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles
Preparation: Ethanol
Year Collected: 1956
Locality: Villalba, Dona Juana Forests, Puerto Rico
  • Paratype: Rivero, J. A. 1915. Breviora. (103): 4.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
A terrestrial species that breeds by direct development, it is known from extremely humid closed-canopy forest.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Associations

Known predators

  • Waide RB, Reagan WB (eds) (1996) The food web of a tropical rainforest. University of Chicago Press, Chicago
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Known prey organisms

Eleutherodactylus eneidae preys on:
Avicularia laeta
Acari
Araneae
Geophilomorpha
Pseudoscorpionida
Coleoptera
Diptera
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Schizomus
Orthoptera
Collembola
Isoptera
Psocoptera
Auchenorrhyncha
Sternorrhyncha
Lepidoptera
Stylomatophora

Based on studies in:
Puerto Rico, El Verde (Rainforest)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Waide RB, Reagan WB (eds) (1996) The food web of a tropical rainforest. University of Chicago Press, Chicago
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
CR
Critically Endangered

Red List Criteria
A2ae

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
Blair Hedges, Neftalí Rios-López

Reviewer/s
Ariadne Angulo and Simon Stuart

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Critically Endangered because of a drastic population decline, estimated to be more than 80% over the last three generations, inferred from the apparent disappearance of most of the population.

History
  • 2008
    Critically Endangered
    (IUCN 2008)
  • 2008
    Critically Endangered
  • 2004
    Critically Endangered
  • 1996
    Data Deficient
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Population

Population
Formerly uncommon even in the 1980s, this species was last recorded in 1990 and subsequent extensive searches have failed to locate this species. It is now believed to be most probably extinct.

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Threats

Major Threats
While the cause for this species' disappearance remains unknown, potential factors could have been climate change and disease. Rats and mongooses have also been suggested as potential threats (as invasive predators), although literature on this subject is equivocal (Hedges 1993, and Thurley and Bell 1994, support the notion that these introduced species comprise threats to amphibian species, while Reagan and Waide 1996, suggest that rats are lesser predators of Eleutherodactylus coqui), and there is currently no consensus regarding the impact that these species may or may not have on amphibian declines in Puerto Rico. Future research efforts directed at investigating the impact of these invasive species on amphibian populations may help to establish their relative contribution to amphibian declines.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species was known to occur in Luquillo National Forest in the El Yunque area. In view of the risk of chytridiomycosis, it is a very high priority to conduct surveys to determine whether or not this species could still survive in the wild; surviving individuals might need to form the basis for the establishment of an ex-situ population.
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Wikipedia

Eneida's coquí

Eneida's coquí (Eleutherodactylus eneidae) is a species of Coquí, a small variety of frog endemic to the main island of Puerto Rico and its archipelago. Known as coquí de Eneida in Puerto Rico, this amphibian is mainly terrestrial. Its average adult size is from 1.0 to 1.2 inches.[3] It has a number of small warts located across its back and eyelids.[4] Its main color is a light tone of greenish or grayish brown with a yellow tint on its underbelly. They often have a pair of light colored concave lines located on their backs. Their eyes are golden or green colored, generally dark colored with black venal reticulation. Its habitat is located in mountains that are 1,000 to 3,000 feet above sea level.[3] This species seems to have suffered a population reduction, in the process disappearing from areas formerly considered its natural habitat.[3] The reason behind this reduction is under study, and Eneida's coquí has been designated an endangered species until the cause is discovered. This population decrease is not considered to be linked with the loss of its habitat, which has prevented the protection of its habitat.[3]

See also

References

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