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Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is found in a small area around Tacicuaro, north-western Michoacan, to the west of Morelia City in Mexico. It occurs at about 2,000m asl.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This is a metamorphosing species spending most of the time on land in a mosaic of natural grasslands and pine-oak forests. It requires ponds of moderate depth in which to breed, and is able to survive in somewhat modified landscapes, taking advantage of cattle ponds for larval development.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
CR
Critically Endangered

Red List Criteria
B1ab(iii,v)+2ab(iii,v)

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Brad Shaffer, Oscar Flores-Villela, Gabriela Parra-Olea, David Wake

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson, Neil Cox and Bruce Young)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Critically Endangered because its Extent of Occurrence is less than 100 km2 and its Area Of Occupancy is less than 10km2, its distribution is severely fragmented, and there is continuing decline in the number of mature individuals and in the extent and quality of its habitat around the city of Morelia.
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Population

Population
There is no information on current population status; there has been limited fieldwork carried out on this species since the early 1980s.

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Threats

Major Threats
The desiccation, pollution, and conversion of former ponds, small reservoirs, and open habitats to grow crops, represent the main threats to this species, coupled with the urban expansion of Morelia and Uruapan. Introduced predatory fish are also a major concern, both in ponds and small streams.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It does not occur in any protected areas. The conservation and restoration of the natural habitats for this species is urgent, and new field surveys are required to assess the population status of this species. It might be possible to breed this species in captivity and reintroduce it in the wild. It is protected under the category Pr (Special protection) by the Government of Mexico.
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Wikipedia

Blunt-headed salamander

The blunt-headed Salamander (Ambystoma amblycephalum) is a mole salamander endemic to Mexico. It is only known from the vicinity of its type locality, near Morelia, in Michoacán state in Southwestern Mexico.[2] It inhabits a landscape consisting of a mosaic of natural grasslands and pine-oak forests at elevations of about 2,000 m (6,600 ft) asl). Breeding takes place in ponds.[1]

It has both neotenic and terrestrial populations. Neotenic populations are perennibranchiate and retain their fins. Neotenes are very long with extremely short, blunt heads and round eyes. They have relatively short, thick gills. Their coloring is dark brown-gray dorsally, with a lighter gray under-belly. They have small, dark marks on their head and back.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Brad Shaffer, Oscar Flores-Villela, Gabriela Parra-Olea, David Wake (2004). "Ambystoma amblycephalum". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 8 March 2014. 
  2. ^ Frost, Darrel R. (2014). "Ambystoma amblycephalum Taylor, 1940". Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6.0. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 8 March 2014. 


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