Overview

Comprehensive Description

Etymology

The specific name 'gracilis' means slender in Latin.

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Distribution

Range Description

This species ranges from extreme southeastern Nigeria through central and southern Cameroon to Equatorial Guinea, central Gabon and southwestern Central African Republic to the Democratic Republic of Congo. It occurs below 1,200 m asl. Its eastern distributional limits in the Democratic Republic of Congo are particularly unclear. It is presumed to occur in Congo, and this is included on the map.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Osteology

Omosternum has a slender bony style. Sternum is a small cartilaginous plate, without a bony style. Terminal phalanges are T-shaped (Boulenger, 1900).

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Head is much depressed and slightly longer than broad. Snout is longer than the orbit, truncate at the end and scarcely projecting beyond the mouth. Canthus rostralis is distinct; loreal region is concave. Nostril is closer to the end of the snout than the eye. Eye is rather small. Interorbital space is much broader than the upper eyelid. Tymanum is very distinct, measuring two-thirds or three-fourths the diameter of the eye. Fingers and toes are long and slender, the tips dilated into small disks. Subarticular tubercles are small but very prominent. The first finger does not extend quite as far as second. A rather prominent, moderately large, oval inner metatarsal tubercle is present. The tibio-tarsal articulation reaches the tip of the snout or slightly beyond (Boulenger, 1900).

Dorsum and venter are dark brown. A black band, edged beneath with white, extends on each side from the nostril to halfway down the side of the body, passing through the eye and tympanum, and widening behind; this band is followed by a large black inguinal spot. Dark symmetrical markings are present on the limbs, those on the front and back of the thighs are black, edged with white. Ventral surfaces are spotted or marbled with white. Males have internal vocal sacs (Boulenger, 1900).

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Size

The type specimen measured 37 mm from snout to vent (Boulenger, 1900).

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It lives in moist lowland and lower montane forest, and cannot survive in degraded habitats. It is found in mature secondary forest. The animals are usually found on the ground, or in plants up to 20 cm above ground. They breed in forest streams and the males call from slopes and marshy depressions close to streams.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group

Reviewer/s
Stuart, S.N.

Contributor/s
Amiet, J.-L. & Burger, M.

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution and presumed large population.

History
  • 2004
    Least Concern
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Population

Population
This is the most common species of Cardioglossa in Cameroon.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats

Due to its large range, and its intolerance of secondary habitats, it is likely that there are declines in some areas due to forest loss.

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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It presumably occurs in a number of protected areas, and has definitely been recorded from Korup National Park.
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Wikipedia

Cardioglossa gracilis

Cardioglossa gracilis is a species of frog in the Arthroleptidae family. It is found in Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Nigeria, and possibly Republic of the Congo. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, and rivers. It is threatened by habitat loss.

References[edit]

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